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Getting lean..help&tips

mbp76mbp76 Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
I want to get leaner !...I have been trying to get a bit leaner..as of now I have a bout 16 % BF.
But having trouble getting rid of belly fat..and chest..I work out..I do HIIT and other weight lifting..

Replies

  • Spliner1969Spliner1969 Posts: 1,499Member Member Posts: 1,499Member Member
    What are you doing now? Logging/weighing your food? Calorie deficit?

    Since you can't spot reduce you simply have to lose weight to get rid of the belly fat. Even endless ab work won't get rid of it, the fat will just cover the muscles. I've had some success using the calculators over at iifym.com to calculate my macros for fat loss in a deficit. Been doing it for about 1.5 years now. I still have some fat left in the mid-section and will likely need to drop further down on the BMI scale to get rid of it completely. I do a ton of ab work and it's been paying off, but the fat is still there. Set your protein levels to around 1g/lb of your target weight, stay at a calorie deficit until you hit a 20 or 21 BMI, and while you're at all this, exercise and build muscle as much as possible so that when the fat is gone there's something there to show off.
  • Gallowmere1984Gallowmere1984 Posts: 5,220Member Member Posts: 5,220Member Member
    What are you doing now? Logging/weighing your food? Calorie deficit?

    Since you can't spot reduce you simply have to lose weight to get rid of the belly fat. Even endless ab work won't get rid of it, the fat will just cover the muscles. I've had some success using the calculators over at iifym.com to calculate my macros for fat loss in a deficit. Been doing it for about 1.5 years now. I still have some fat left in the mid-section and will likely need to drop further down on the BMI scale to get rid of it completely. I do a ton of ab work and it's been paying off, but the fat is still there. Set your protein levels to around 1g/lb of your target weight, stay at a calorie deficit until you hit a 20 or 21 BMI, and while you're at all this, exercise and build muscle as much as possible so that when the fat is gone there's something there to show off.

    Most of this, pretty much. Also, the more hypertrophy you manage to get on your abs and obliques, the higher a bodyfat you can get away with before they fade out.

    As an example, when I was a skinnyfat 12%, I had no abs showing; just a flat midsection. On my current bulk, they haven't completely disappeared yet, and I'm getting north of 16%.

    So no, you can't spot reduce, but you absolutely do need to build them up to ever see definition. Get to working them HLRs, and buy an ab wheel. That cheap little thing is one of the best ab workouts ever, so long as you don't halfass the movement.
  • AnvilHeadAnvilHead Posts: 10,062Member Member Posts: 10,062Member Member
    What are you doing now? Logging/weighing your food? Calorie deficit?

    Since you can't spot reduce you simply have to lose weight to get rid of the belly fat. Even endless ab work won't get rid of it, the fat will just cover the muscles. I've had some success using the calculators over at iifym.com to calculate my macros for fat loss in a deficit. Been doing it for about 1.5 years now. I still have some fat left in the mid-section and will likely need to drop further down on the BMI scale to get rid of it completely. I do a ton of ab work and it's been paying off, but the fat is still there. Set your protein levels to around 1g/lb of your target weight, stay at a calorie deficit until you hit a 20 or 21 BMI, and while you're at all this, exercise and build muscle as much as possible so that when the fat is gone there's something there to show off.

    BMI has nothing to do with getting lean, per se. Bodyfat percentage is what determines your leanness. It's quite possible for a person to be 20-21 BMI and "skinnyfat" (high BF% even at low weight).

    People often confuse BMI and BF%, but they're not the same thing at all and there's no correlation between them.
  • Gallowmere1984Gallowmere1984 Posts: 5,220Member Member Posts: 5,220Member Member
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    What are you doing now? Logging/weighing your food? Calorie deficit?

    Since you can't spot reduce you simply have to lose weight to get rid of the belly fat. Even endless ab work won't get rid of it, the fat will just cover the muscles. I've had some success using the calculators over at iifym.com to calculate my macros for fat loss in a deficit. Been doing it for about 1.5 years now. I still have some fat left in the mid-section and will likely need to drop further down on the BMI scale to get rid of it completely. I do a ton of ab work and it's been paying off, but the fat is still there. Set your protein levels to around 1g/lb of your target weight, stay at a calorie deficit until you hit a 20 or 21 BMI, and while you're at all this, exercise and build muscle as much as possible so that when the fat is gone there's something there to show off.

    BMI has nothing to do with getting lean, per se. Bodyfat percentage is what determines your leanness. It's quite possible for a person to be 20-21 BMI and "skinnyfat" (high BF% even at low weight).

    People often confuse BMI and BF%, but they're not the same thing at all and there's no correlation between them.

    This is a very good point.

    Extreme example; Rhino is c1 obese:
    mjggodrfpxs1.jpg
    edited February 17
  • Spliner1969Spliner1969 Posts: 1,499Member Member Posts: 1,499Member Member
    AnvilHead wrote: »
    People often confuse BMI and BF%, but they're not the same thing at all and there's no correlation between them.

    I wasn't confusing the two, but had no idea you could have such a low BMI and have a high body fat % at the same time. I guess it would depend a lot on other factors. My assumption was that when you hit the 20's for BMI you would have no choice but to be lean, but I do see what you mean, if there was no muscle to speak of, such as someone who diets with no exercise and had very little muscle to begin with, then body fat would be much higher at a lower weight.
  • Spliner1969Spliner1969 Posts: 1,499Member Member Posts: 1,499Member Member
    This is a very good point.

    Extreme example; Rhino is c1 obese:
    mjggodrfpxs1.jpg

    You know, I knew, and do know people now, in the obese category with a high amount of muscle, just had never put 2 and 2 together. I remember one of them telling me they were considered obese yet they have a high amount of muscle and stay below 15% body fat.
  • trigden1991trigden1991 Posts: 3,446Member Member Posts: 3,446Member Member
    This is a very good point.

    Extreme example; Rhino is c1 obese:
    mjggodrfpxs1.jpg

    You know, I knew, and do know people now, in the obese category with a high amount of muscle, just had never put 2 and 2 together. I remember one of them telling me they were considered obese yet they have a high amount of muscle and stay below 15% body fat.

    I'm obese according to BMI but around 13-15% bodyfat.
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