Herbalife weight loss

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  • SonicDeathMonkey80
    SonicDeathMonkey80 Posts: 4,489 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    I'd like to know a little more about why Herbalife is thought to be a scam. There is a distributer in my neighborhood that also offers free workouts and make most of their money by selling the shakes they make in the store, and the ingredients on the labels aren't terrible. It covers my current shortage of iron (which I should probably get checked out) and keeps me full. It also tastes freaking delicious. I have already been tracking my exercise and food intake here, I've lost 30lbs before discovering this place and I think the free classes are cool. However, I'm afriad that soon I may be obligated to buy something, though I am already addicted to the shakes and try and buy them when they are discounted (or like this morning, I was the only one to respond to the promo on FB and show up to do the workout, so one of the people distributing it paid for my shake!) as they sell them at 7 bucks a pop. I know I could make my own at home. Do all protein/weightloss powders have this bad rap? Or just Herbalife? I don't see anything sneaky in it, I know that it's a MLM thing, but it is a real product and I don't see anything wrong.
    Practically all MLM products are made by a 3rd party manufacturer with a "proprietary blend". These blends don't actual dosage amounts, so just "mentioning" that an ingredient in a product for many is enough for them to believe it's in the right dosage for it to be effective.
    3rd party manufacturers will also use lower quality raw product. Much of it from China where there is no regulation.
    So what are you paying the 7 bucks for? Well about $2 or so for it goes to manufacturing, and the other $5 gets divided up amongst the other "upline" who had nothing to do with you buying it.
    Wouldn't it better to save that $5 towards making your own?
    Incidently, no shake works without calorie deficit.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Yeah I know the shake wouldn't work without a calorie deficiet. I guess my question is, though these people are really nice, their place is small but open and comfortable, I am aware that they are there to sell something and they make no bones about it. If there is a kind of protein powder/meal replacement powder that is recommended by professionals, and not as expensive but still has the range of flavors. I'm game. Honestly, the lady who owns the place is super nice and I'd still like to support her efforts of trying to be her own boss. I think my only concern is that there are no qualifications needed upfront to be a "Trainer" and I haven't asked them about that.
    Unfortunately your patronage isn't going to benefit her much. The majority of the money made on you goes to the upline. The seller makes pennies. That's why their whole position is to recruit others under them to make money. Without recruiting, their income isn't much at all.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
    I do understand now... but now I feel stuck... almost like I've obligated myself. She and her husband I guess are also nutrition coaches? DNA Mind-Body & Nutrition whatever is the name of the store, I did Google it and though it felt lacking it didn't seem shady. I figure I am over 100lbs over weight and could use all the help I can get, and so far all of the help has been free, they said they make their money primarily from meal planning and that meal plans do not have to include Herbalife. Would you have any suggestions for backing out when I'm eventually asked to purchase something? I have given my email and phone number, even friended her personally on FB. I don't want to seem like a mooch, taking all the free things and not wanting to really "commit".

    Real friends don't sell this stuff to friends. The second you buy, you are a customer, and that's that. This stuff sells because it leverages relationships against the customer. You can say no to the d-bag working at GNC, but it's harder to say no to your friends/family.
  • Sabine_Stroehm
    Sabine_Stroehm Posts: 19,263 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    I'd like to know a little more about why Herbalife is thought to be a scam. There is a distributer in my neighborhood that also offers free workouts and make most of their money by selling the shakes they make in the store, and the ingredients on the labels aren't terrible. It covers my current shortage of iron (which I should probably get checked out) and keeps me full. It also tastes freaking delicious. I have already been tracking my exercise and food intake here, I've lost 30lbs before discovering this place and I think the free classes are cool. However, I'm afriad that soon I may be obligated to buy something, though I am already addicted to the shakes and try and buy them when they are discounted (or like this morning, I was the only one to respond to the promo on FB and show up to do the workout, so one of the people distributing it paid for my shake!) as they sell them at 7 bucks a pop. I know I could make my own at home. Do all protein/weightloss powders have this bad rap? Or just Herbalife? I don't see anything sneaky in it, I know that it's a MLM thing, but it is a real product and I don't see anything wrong.
    Practically all MLM products are made by a 3rd party manufacturer with a "proprietary blend". These blends don't actual dosage amounts, so just "mentioning" that an ingredient in a product for many is enough for them to believe it's in the right dosage for it to be effective.
    3rd party manufacturers will also use lower quality raw product. Much of it from China where there is no regulation.
    So what are you paying the 7 bucks for? Well about $2 or so for it goes to manufacturing, and the other $5 gets divided up amongst the other "upline" who had nothing to do with you buying it.
    Wouldn't it better to save that $5 towards making your own?
    Incidently, no shake works without calorie deficit.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Yeah I know the shake wouldn't work without a calorie deficiet. I guess my question is, though these people are really nice, their place is small but open and comfortable, I am aware that they are there to sell something and they make no bones about it. If there is a kind of protein powder/meal replacement powder that is recommended by professionals, and not as expensive but still has the range of flavors. I'm game. Honestly, the lady who owns the place is super nice and I'd still like to support her efforts of trying to be her own boss. I think my only concern is that there are no qualifications needed upfront to be a "Trainer" and I haven't asked them about that.
    Unfortunately your patronage isn't going to benefit her much. The majority of the money made on you goes to the upline. The seller makes pennies. That's why their whole position is to recruit others under them to make money. Without recruiting, their income isn't much at all.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
    I do understand now... but now I feel stuck... almost like I've obligated myself. She and her husband I guess are also nutrition coaches? DNA Mind-Body & Nutrition whatever is the name of the store, I did Google it and though it felt lacking it didn't seem shady. I figure I am over 100lbs over weight and could use all the help I can get, and so far all of the help has been free, they said they make their money primarily from meal planning and that meal plans do not have to include Herbalife. Would you have any suggestions for backing out when I'm eventually asked to purchase something? I have given my email and phone number, even friended her personally on FB. I don't want to seem like a mooch, taking all the free things and not wanting to really "commit".

    Real friends don't sell this stuff to friends. The second you buy, you are a customer, and that's that. This stuff sells because it leverages relationships against the customer. You can say no to the d-bag working at GNC, but it's harder to say no to your friends/family.

    THIS. 100% This.
  • missdeedey
    Options
    [quote="SonicDeathMonkey80;30231679"
    Real friends don't sell this stuff to friends. The second you buy, you are a customer, and that's that. This stuff sells because it leverages relationships against the customer. You can say no to the d-bag working at GNC, but it's harder to say no to your friends/family. [/quote]

    So true...
    Im new here. Well sadly i just bought my pack of herbalife because I was so tired listening to my friend promoting (nagging) me to buy from her. She knew I wanna lose some weight. So there she went and suddenly I'm now loaded with 3 shakes.. just because I just dont have heart to tell her no. *sigh* I do want to lose weight and healthier, but herbalife was never my intention...

    But i get positive impact from this, herbalife brought me to MFP... when doing some google about herbalife, i got introduce to this site.

  • ninerbuff
    ninerbuff Posts: 48,687 Member
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    ninerbuff wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    I'd like to know a little more about why Herbalife is thought to be a scam. There is a distributer in my neighborhood that also offers free workouts and make most of their money by selling the shakes they make in the store, and the ingredients on the labels aren't terrible. It covers my current shortage of iron (which I should probably get checked out) and keeps me full. It also tastes freaking delicious. I have already been tracking my exercise and food intake here, I've lost 30lbs before discovering this place and I think the free classes are cool. However, I'm afriad that soon I may be obligated to buy something, though I am already addicted to the shakes and try and buy them when they are discounted (or like this morning, I was the only one to respond to the promo on FB and show up to do the workout, so one of the people distributing it paid for my shake!) as they sell them at 7 bucks a pop. I know I could make my own at home. Do all protein/weightloss powders have this bad rap? Or just Herbalife? I don't see anything sneaky in it, I know that it's a MLM thing, but it is a real product and I don't see anything wrong.
    Practically all MLM products are made by a 3rd party manufacturer with a "proprietary blend". These blends don't actual dosage amounts, so just "mentioning" that an ingredient in a product for many is enough for them to believe it's in the right dosage for it to be effective.
    3rd party manufacturers will also use lower quality raw product. Much of it from China where there is no regulation.
    So what are you paying the 7 bucks for? Well about $2 or so for it goes to manufacturing, and the other $5 gets divided up amongst the other "upline" who had nothing to do with you buying it.
    Wouldn't it better to save that $5 towards making your own?
    Incidently, no shake works without calorie deficit.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    Yeah I know the shake wouldn't work without a calorie deficiet. I guess my question is, though these people are really nice, their place is small but open and comfortable, I am aware that they are there to sell something and they make no bones about it. If there is a kind of protein powder/meal replacement powder that is recommended by professionals, and not as expensive but still has the range of flavors. I'm game. Honestly, the lady who owns the place is super nice and I'd still like to support her efforts of trying to be her own boss. I think my only concern is that there are no qualifications needed upfront to be a "Trainer" and I haven't asked them about that.
    Unfortunately your patronage isn't going to benefit her much. The majority of the money made on you goes to the upline. The seller makes pennies. That's why their whole position is to recruit others under them to make money. Without recruiting, their income isn't much at all.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png
    I do understand now... but now I feel stuck... almost like I've obligated myself. She and her husband I guess are also nutrition coaches? DNA Mind-Body & Nutrition whatever is the name of the store, I did Google it and though it felt lacking it didn't seem shady. I figure I am over 100lbs over weight and could use all the help I can get, and so far all of the help has been free, they said they make their money primarily from meal planning and that meal plans do not have to include Herbalife. Would you have any suggestions for backing out when I'm eventually asked to purchase something? I have given my email and phone number, even friended her personally on FB. I don't want to seem like a mooch, taking all the free things and not wanting to really "commit".
    Your commitment is to you and what you feel is best for you. Whether they feel offended by it or not, they don't earn your income for you. You do that on your own, so you should make the correct decisions on how to spend it. GOOD business people respect decisions that are in opposition of theirs.

    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

  • jenilla1
    jenilla1 Posts: 11,118 Member
    edited November 2014
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    I do understand now... but now I feel stuck... almost like I've obligated myself... I don't want to seem like a mooch, taking all the free things and not wanting to really "commit".

    That's what they're counting on. It's a common sales technique.
  • hortensehildegarde
    hortensehildegarde Posts: 592 Member
    Options
    I don't want to seem like a mooch, taking all the free things and not wanting to really "commit".
    [/quote]

    This is the "scammy" part- they lure you in with free stuff then will play on your emotional involvement to get you to buy stuff you don't actually want to buy.

    It's fine if you decide you want to spend $7 on a shake because you like and want that shake, but it's manipulative and shady if you do so because you feel guilted into it.

    OP the scales are likely right, I had similar results the first couple of weeks (not on herbalife or anything, just regulating my caloric intake). My weight can vary anywhere within up to 6 lbs or so in a single day. Until you get some solid tracking and data collection on your personal experience you won't know how much is water or normal weight fluctuation or actual body mass.

    Regardless the point is one can see equally similar results without purchasing any expensive supplement, and I wouldn't recommend that either for sustainable loss nor for keeping it off long-term.

  • What happened to googling?

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/dividendchannel/2014/11/07/new-52-week-low-could-prompt-more-insider-buying-at-herbalife/

    From wikipedia
    "Herbalife is a multi-level marketing (sometimes called MLM or network marketing) company. In addition to profits from product sales, Herbalife distributors can earn additional commissions from sales by other distributors they recruited, called their downline distributors. Supporters of MLM contend this is a fair compensation system, while critics contend that it is similar to a pyramid scheme.[61][62] Critics also argue that the company does not make enough effort to curb abuses by individual distributors, though Herbalife has consistently denied such allegations"

    http://www.factsaboutherbalife.com/

    pj266b4c9ggv.png

    OP: is that the kind of company you want to entrust your weight loss to?