What nobody tells you about losing weight

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  • IronIsMyTherapy
    IronIsMyTherapy Posts: 482 Member
    cppeace wrote: »
    That every Single week (If even that long) you have to work harder to burn the same amount of calories.

    That your cat takes longer to find a comfy position laying on you lol

    idk if this helps but as your weight drops, your calories have to as well. If you're 150lbs and lose 15lbs, you weigh 10% less and your calories need to drop 10% accordingly. Assuming your activity is the same and you haven't gained muscle.
  • IronIsMyTherapy
    IronIsMyTherapy Posts: 482 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    cppeace wrote: »
    That every Single week (If even that long) you have to work harder to burn the same amount of calories.

    That your cat takes longer to find a comfy position laying on you lol

    idk if this helps but as your weight drops, your calories have to as well. If you're 150lbs and lose 15lbs, you weigh 10% less and your calories need to drop 10% accordingly. Assuming your activity is the same and you haven't gained muscle.

    Not quite exactly.

    For sure your caloric requirement does decrease as your mass does; there's less of you to move around. It's not linear, though. A 10% decrease in mass doesn't mean a 10% decrease in calorie needs. A large amount of our daily calorie needs are to fuel our brain. Our brain uses a LOT of fuel. But yes, it's a very good idea to go back to the goal setting portion of MFP as your mass decreases and then reset your calorie consumption target because, sadly if you like to eat, it will decrease.

    As an example, if I tell MFP I want to maintain at 175 pounds, I get 1980 calories. If I tell MFP I want to maintain at 145 pounds, I get 1810 calories. A 22.8% reduction in my mass reduces my caloric requirements 8.6%. So yes, you do have to adjust your calorie-in goal as you get closer to your target weight goal, but it's not one for one.

    I get your point and don't disagree, although MFP's recommendations are largely inaccurate. There's a lot of factors not accounted for, like LBM. If I cut from 210 to 185 for a competition, my caloric requirement decrease is closer to one for one because of my approach to diet and exercise.