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What nobody tells you about losing weight

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  • Alatariel75
    Alatariel75 Posts: 17,959 Member
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    Internet is going bonkers here, sorry for double posts.
    I am having the same problem.
    Anyway, hope things work out for you.
    Thanks!
    I know for me and my situation, if I eat high carbs alone, I get really hungry in about 10 minutes. I have to eat lower carbs, and always with a protein source. I never eat protein alone, and I don't supplement it. Excess protein is also very hard to digest in the body. Protein is very hard on the kidneys.

    Eggs and steak, or eggs and a sausage or ham are much better than me trying to survive on cold cereal in the mornings, for example. My husband is fine with it, but it's a waste of time (and sugar) for me.

    I am not diabetic, but sugars and I don't get along, and I need to watch things like bread, etc. too. My system craves meat and vegetables the most, and that is what it does best with. Some natural fats, but again, easy on the carbs.

    Try adding more fiber or vegetables like broccoli and see if that helps quell the hunger.
    It seems our situations are not so different. When I started this latest diet, I began with about 2.5 kg of vegetables in combination with some lean protein. Due to the quantity of vegetables I was eating, that protein was essentially superfluous, but culture has its impacts. Over time, I reduced both the protein and the vegetables. Only eating a kg of vegetables now, which I am told is still more than most people. I am also adding psyllium but not to have more fibre, although that is obviously the result. I add it to my breakfast and to spinach, to make it more pleasant (for me) to eat. Needless to say, my fibre intake is relatively high.

    I think, but can certainly not prove, that the combination of low(er) digestible carbs and relatively high amounts of fibre containing foods, a.k.a. vegetables is what does it for me, but I have to remain vigilant: I do not eat fruit (as the Germans say: vegetables are the better fruit) because they have more sugar and because they are a trigger food for me. I also only eat low-carb vegetables and only if they are relatively high in fibre. So, I eat broccoli and spinach, for example, but stay away from daikon and zucchini because while they are very low in calories, they are also very low in fibre. I can just as well drink a glass of water, they do nothing for me.

    I also do not use added oils, and haven't for years and years. Oil does nothing for me, except for making me fat. I do love nuts, seeds, avocadoes and cheese but I stay away from them because they are trigger foods and so high in calories that I can only eat ridiculously small amounts anyway. Why tempt fate? It is easier to simply abstain. I made that last decision in the beginning of this year and it gave me something I did not expect: food serenity. It just made my life so much easier and tolerable and easier to maintain and further reduce my weight. I still eat fat, but in the form of sardines, lupini beans and soybeans. Of course, even so-called fat-free vegetables still contain a tiny bit, as does coffee.
    I am also convinced that some food additives make me more hungry, and I definitely had bad experiences with medications wrecking my natural hunger cues.
    That's where we differ, apparently. Food additives have no effect on me. I don't buy any foods that contain them, but I do occasionally use MiO or Crystal Light if I want a fruity taste. However, since I stopped eating nuts, seeds and cheese, that desire has essentially vanished.

    There is one thing though. Loblaws sells a vegetable blend under the No Name brand, aptly named "mixed vegetables" that I really like. I scrapped it because it is high(ish) in calories and because it made me hungry, quite possibly due to the higher carb content as it contains lima beans and corn. I fully plan to try it again after I am on a stable and low-enough weight –for me. I hope it will work, I love that mixture.
    If I think I am hungry, I will have water first, and if I am still hungry in 10 minutes, then I know I need to eat food.
    It is a common-enough suggestion. In my case, it does nothing. Most likely because I have been drinking far more than most people for most of my adult life. Nevertheless, it seems to work for many people so there must be something to it. Great tip.

    I appreciate your thoughtful replies, thank-you! We do have some things in common, and I will be reading your posts again in more detail. Briefly, yes, corn and lima beans on this end, too. Not sure why, but seems to me years ago an NP (Naturopath) told me I was allergic to them (and most beans), but with corn I think it is the sugar, and the fact that most of it is now GMO, and not what my grandparents would have farmed.

    Someone suggested reading the book "Eat for Your Blood Type," years ago, but honestly I don't need anymore books and could probably find a free copy online somewhere or a cheap used one. It would be interesting if any here has read it or follows that method of eating.

    Other signs point to wheat sensitivity, and "leaky gut" syndrome.

    Probiotics and prebiotics also helped calm my system a bit in general, and with veggies, specifically, I make sure I rinse all potatoes after I cut them (and before I cook them), and that seems to help reduce some starch a tiny bit. (Same with rice).

    I have been toying with the idea of eating only one food at a group, and alternating days for a few days, to see what happens. It will be kind of an "elimination diet," while reducing calories. So one day I would eat only fruits until full (and low carb ones), next day all the veggies I want, next day only rice, next day only lean meats.

    I really need to figure out what combinations of food I need to avoid, or what drops the water weight (read bloat!).


    It's like being my own lab rat, ha, ha.

    Anyway, little by little. I hear you about the hunger scenario also. Part of it goes along with fasting/abstaining from meat (eg. Lent, etc.) here, but it's also good for your willpower as you have pointed out.

    In some ways my mind is a lot quicker and sharper with hunger, as opposed to that feeling of being lazy and needing a tap after a huge turkey dinner or something where all the L-Tryptophan foods just lull a person to sleep, so to speak.

    Your weight loss is very impressive, and it was nice to read about your progress! Thanks for sharing, and keep on truckin'!

    Re the elimination diet - I actually highly recommend the Whole30 if you're interested in assessing what different foods do to your body. I did it as a last resort to try and solve what was suspected to be chronic vestibular migraines, and found soooo many other interesting things about my reactions to particular foods. There's multiple books about it, but to be honest - all the information you need to do it is on the Whole30 website. In a nutshell it's 30 days of no grains, no legumes, no sugars (save for in fruit), no dairy, no alcohol and avoiding some preservatives and additives (ie carneegan, sulfites etc), then you do a reintroduction where you add each group on its own back for 1 day and then go 2 back on the Whole30 and assess what each type of food does to you. Very, very educational.
  • Alatariel75
    Alatariel75 Posts: 17,959 Member
    edited October 2022
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    Deleted duplicate
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
    edited October 2022
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    Deleted because of comment duplication.
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
    edited October 2022
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    Deleted because of comment duplication.
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
    edited October 2022
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    Sorry, something is wrong with the Internet connection. I seem to have mixed up two different comments as a result. I apologise for that.
    Not sure why, but seems to me years ago an NP (Naturopath) told me I was allergic to them (and most beans), but with corn I think it is the sugar, and the fact that most of it is now GMO, and not what my grandparents would have farmed.
    Many people like naturopathy because they have no idea what it is (and neither do naturopaths): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0Vp4kg-w-c
    You may also want to check out "Britt Hermes", an American ex-naturopath. I just checked her website, she seems to be more or less silent right now but that may be because is a real doctor by now. I remember that she was actively studying to become one some years ago.
    Here is an interview with her on the CBC:
    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/whitecoat/naturopathy-mainstream-medicine-what-s-the-harm-1.3754973/ex-nd-britt-hermes-on-why-she-quit-naturopathy-1.3754990
    Yet another interesting source is Edzard Ernst, the world's first university professor on alternative medicine. He is retired now, but still very active: https://edzardernst.com/
    Someone suggested reading the book "Eat for Your Blood Type," years ago, but honestly I don't need anymore books and could probably find a free copy online somewhere or a cheap used one. It would be interesting if any here has read it or follows that method of eating.
    While it is difficult to *prove* a negative, the point is, ufortunately, that this is nonsense. Please do not believe me. That is the very last thing I would want. Read about it in credible sources. You will find out that there is not a hint of credible evidence for it. That is as close as we can hope to get to "proven to be nonsensical". It is said, usually among physicians, that there are no more dangerous words in medicine than "in my experience". That is why medicine (and most other scientific endeavours) have essentially become statistical, at least the newer parts. That is the difference with "alternative practices": many bold statements, (almost) zero verifiable evidence. As one smart person pointed out: what do we call alternative medicine that works? We call it medicine.
    This is –and this is personal opinion, not proven fact– probably one of the reasons that some diets don't seem to work: they are not based on anything that actually does anything for weight loss.
    Other signs point to wheat sensitivity, and "leaky gut" syndrome.
    When I was little, just about 60 years ago, I was diagnosed with cœliac disease. I asked my endocrinologist to check it. It turns out that the disease that has poisoned my childhood is a disease I do not have. I d not blame my parents. They did not know any better. I do not blame my long-deceased pediatrician who made the diagnosis: he did not know any better either, and it was a plausible explanation for what he thought he saw. It is now easy to say that he should have looked at the evidence more closely but the truth is that here was still a lot of magic in medicine in the 60s. Even the term "evidence-based medicine" was only coined in the 90s and it took a lot of convincing before doctors started to accept it. Today, there are still (fortunately, fewer and fewer) doctors who are not on board. So-called alternative practitioners (including some doctors who buy into this stuff) sometimes claim they embrace it, but when you dig a bit deeper you find out they don't.

    I have no specific comments to make on probiotics and prebiotics, except that there is precious little evidence for the lofty claims. Most of the effects we think these things have are either placebo effects or post hoc ergo propter hoc (after this, therefore because of this) conclusions. It is an easy mistake to make and, to make it even more dangerous, sometimes the conclusion is right. My own most important lesson in this is my absolute conviction that metformin helped me lose weight... which turned out to be utter nonsense.
    I make sure I rinse all potatoes after I cut them (and before I cook them), and that seems to help reduce some starch a tiny bit. (Same with rice).
    It does reduce the starch a bit, but think of it: these are foods that are almost entirely made up of starch. Do you really think that rinsing them will genuinely make a difference? It can make a difference in the mouthfeel because that tiny little bit of dissolved starch will "glue" them a little bit tighter together and may help to create an external layer that feels different. I honestly have no reasons to think it goes any further than that.
    I have been toying with the idea of eating only one food at a group, and alternating days for a few days, to see what happens. It will be kind of an "elimination diet," while reducing calories. So one day I would eat only fruits until full (and low carb ones), next day all the veggies I want, next day only rice, next day only lean meats.
    That is not necessarily a bad idea, but you should probably do it for a little longer than just a few days and the problem with that is that you will have other effects that come into play. I would suggest that a better strategy would be to eat just normally, and eliminate only one food from this "normal" diet and do that for a week or two while paying a lot of attention to what happens. Mistakes can still be made, but you have a fighting chance of getting trustworthy results, at least for yourself.

    Anecdotally, I tried a fruitarian diet myself around 35 years ago. I really loved it tremendously, but I had to stop it, mainly because I gained weight like there was no tomorrow because I was ravenously hungry all the time, and I would simply not have been able to limit portions. It was also very expensive, despite the fact that I was able to buy at a wholesale market because I bought so much. I should add that a fruitarian diet is not a good idea at all from a health perspective, but I did not consider that at the time, I didn't know then what I know now.
    I really need to figure out what combinations of food I need to avoid, or what drops the water weight (read bloat!).

    It's like being my own lab rat, ha, ha.
    Sure, nothing wrong with that, but please have your doctor involved. Experimenting is fun, but it is also dangerous.
    Anyway, little by little. I hear you about the hunger scenario also. Part of it goes along with fasting/abstaining from meat (eg. Lent, etc.) here, but it's also good for your willpower as you have pointed out.

    In some ways my mind is a lot quicker and sharper with hunger, as opposed to that feeling of being lazy and needing a tap after a huge turkey dinner or something where all the L-Tryptophan foods just lull a person to sleep, so to speak.
    Hunger has different effects on different people, but I have to say that being so hungry that your stomach hurts and you would like an analgesic, only to discover that it aggravates the problem and being so nauseous that you can't concentrate and having dry spills all the time that are driving you to the washroom and wishing you were dead may well be good for strengthening your willpower, but it can also motivate you to do stupid things. I remember one day a friend asked me what I really wanted and my response was euthanasia. My life was simply no longer worth living. Obviously, I never got what I wanted because I am still here talking about it, but I did come awfully close. That said, that may be why I am able to tolerate the hunger I still have all the time. Who is to say? I don't know.
    Your weight loss is very impressive, and it was nice to read about your progress! Thanks for sharing, and keep on truckin'!
    Thanks. I honestly don't feel that way. Once I applied that simple piece of advice I was given, it was merely a matter of applying the principle rigorously in combination with time (almost four years now). I don't know when I will be where I need to be (since I don't even know where that is ^_^), but I know that, all things being equal, I will get there. I am guessing it will be around the end of this year or the beginning of next year. While I am very much looking forward to it, I think it won't change much. With some luck, I might be able to eat a tiny bit more energy, but given what I have seen so far, it will probably not be more than a hundred kcal or so, i.e. essentially negligible.

    Weight loss is a struggle, and contrary to what many people hope, the struggle is usually life-long. Let's not forget that eating normally turned out to be overeating in reality, so "going back to normal" is not an option. Many people claim that diets don't work, but I submit that many of them work just fine, it is our behaviour after weight loss that makes them seemingly fail, because we refuse to accept reality, but clearly, it is possible for all of us.

  • willboywonder
    willboywonder Posts: 136 Member
    edited October 2022
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    Good luck
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
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    Indeed. Rigidity is great if you love it, but it is not really required. In my case, I am rigid at home, but don't make a fuss when I go out. I just minimise my portions and suck it up. If any weight was gained, it won't be much and I will be back to where I was in a few days anyway.
    I do not eat cookies and whatever at home. As some who live alone, that is deadly. If it is in my home, it will end up in my mouth. Dietitians say that you have to learn to throw things away. Sure. I call that food waste, we have far too much of that and it is bad for the environment and the climate. I simply abstain, and since I do that, my life has (quite unexpectedly for me) become a lot easier. That may not be the case for everyone, this is more psychological than physiological, but there it is, and I take advantage of the effect.
  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
    edited October 2022
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    It's absolutely time-consuming to read each and every label, and yet there is no other option.
    Wise words. I have been reading labels since I was able to read, often to the ridicule of those around me, but I didn't care about that. My reasoning has always been, or at least for as long as I remember, that if someone made the effort of writing something on or enclosed with a product that I spend money on, it is worth my time to read it. After all, part of my payment went to pay for this (dis)information. That includes nutrition facts labels and manuals and any other stuff. It is also why I have always rejected the claim of "hidden sugars" and the like. How is something hidden if it is mentioned right there for all to read? To read or not to read is a personal freedom and choice, but when one chooses not to read something, it is –in my opinion– dishonest to talk about "hidden whatevers" when those whatevers are staring us in the face.

  • BartBVanBockstaele
    BartBVanBockstaele Posts: 623 Member
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    [It's expensive, full of salt and sugar, and really not that great on the whole, but everyone will have their favourites, and that's fine. Do I miss it? Not really.
    Wise words. I have never found any so-called fast food that I was able to miss.

  • smccary77
    smccary77 Posts: 2 Member
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    Almost daily walking and drinking more water. Using a kitchen scale for serving control will help slowly shed those pounds and have more energy to boot!
  • justanotherloser007
    justanotherloser007 Posts: 578 Member
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    JustJ2014 wrote: »
    Nobody tells you that your wrinkles will show 🤣

    Embrace the face! Lols, I feel ya Just. I haven't updated my face pic since 80 lbs ago. I am still getting used to it.
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