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Interesting Studies: Probably low carb related in one way or another

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  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 12,023Member Member Posts: 12,023Member Member
    True. Very true.

    Death by Foid Pyramid is another interesting read that leads to where we are today... or down to where we are. ;)
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member
    Changes in blood lipid concentrations associated with changes in intake of dietary saturated fat in the context of a healthy low-carbohydrate weight-loss diet: a secondary analysis of the Diet Intervention Examining The Factors Interacting with Treatment Success (DIETFITS) trial.

    Tonclusions:
    Those on a low-carbohydrate weight-loss diet who increase their percentage intake of dietary saturated fat may improve their overall lipid profile provided they focus on a high-quality diet and lower their intakes of both calories and refined carbohydrates. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01826591.


    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member
    Effect of a Low Free Sugar Diet vs Usual Diet on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Adolescent BoysA Randomized Clinical Trial

    Findings In this randomized clinical trial that included 40 adolescent boys aged 11 to 16 years with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease followed up for 8 weeks, provision of a diet low in free sugars compared with usual diet resulted in a greater reduction in hepatic steatosis from 25% to 17% in the low free sugar diet group and from 21% to 20% in the usual diet group, a statistically significant difference of −6.23% when adjusted for baseline.

    Meaning These preliminary findings suggest potential benefit of a diet low in free sugars for children with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, but further research is needed to assess long-term and clinical outcomes.


    Source
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member
    Effects of carbohydrate-restricted diets on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in overweight and obese adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    These favorable changes were more marked in the subgroup with very-low carbohydrate content (< 50 g/d; 0.12 mmol/L; 95%CI, 0.10–0.14; P < 1 × 10−5 and −0.19 mmol/L; 95%CI, −0.26 to −0.12; P = 0.02, respectively).
    Conclusions

    Large randomized controlled trials of at least 6 months duration with carbohydrate restriction appear superior in improving lipid markers when compared with low-fat diets. Dietary guidelines should consider carbohydrate restriction as an alternative dietary strategy for the prevention/management of dyslipidemia for populations with cardiometabolic risk.


    Source
  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 12,023Member Member Posts: 12,023Member Member

    It looks like the Canadian guide chose to copy my plate while using EAT and very little actual science. I like some of it but the whole grain section is just dumb... noodles and bread as whole grains?
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member
    Excellent:
    The Ultimate Guide to the Carnivore Diet
    Table of Contents

    1. What is the carnivore diet?
    1. Keto vs Paleo vs Carnivore: just a new trend?
    2. How can carnivore diets be ketogenic when they have so much protein?
    3. Are there any dangers to carnivore diets?
    4. Humans: carnivores or omnivores?
    1. Humans need meat
    2. Don't humans need plants?
    3. Anti-nutrients and metabolic changes
    4. Potassium
    5. Magnesium
    6. Vitamin C
    5. Won’t I need supplements on the carnivore diet?
    6. Won’t the carnivore diet leave me fiber deficient?
    7. Can a carnivore diet be healthy?
    8. Are carnivores just as crazy as vegans?
    9. Why are so many carnivores into Bitcoin?
    10. Conclusion
    Co-Written by L. Amber O’Hearn and Raphael Sirtoli
    Scientifically Reviewed by Sarah Neidler, PhD

  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member


    Mice:

    Collectively, our data indicate that endogenous insulin hypersecretion contributes causally to pancreatic cancer development. This suggests a modest reduction in fasting insulin via lifestyle interventions or therapeutics may be useful in cancer prevention.
    edited January 25
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member
    The potential role of protein leverage in the US obesity epidemic

    The protein leverage model of obesity posits that decreasing the protein content of the diet leads to compensatory increases in total energy intake to maintain an absolute amount of protein consumed. Increased energy intake thereby results in weight gain.

    According to data from food balance sheets from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, while the absolute protein content of the US food supply has increased since the early 1970s, the fraction of available calories from protein has decreased by ~1% due to greater increases in available carbohydrate and fat. Surprisingly, even such a small decrease in the protein fraction of the food supply has the potential to result in large increases in energy intake according to the protein leverage model.

    Therefore, while the protein leverage effect is unlikely to fully explain the obesity epidemic, its potential contribution should not be ignored.


    Source via Kevin Hall
  • nvmomketonvmomketo Posts: 12,023Member Member Posts: 12,023Member Member
  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member
    Our latest RCT paper was just submitted for peer review and now available as a @NutriXiv preprint: "Ultra-processed diets cause excess calorie intake and weight gain: A one-month inpatient randomized controlled trial of ad libitum food intake". -Kevin Hall

    Some tweet threads:

  • AlabasterVerveAlabasterVerve Posts: 3,040Member Member Posts: 3,040Member Member
    Low-carbohydrate diets differing in carbohydrate restriction improve cardiometabolic and anthropometric markers in healthy adults: A randomised clinical trial.

    Results:
    Of 77 participants, 39 (51%) completed the study. .... The largest improvements in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) and TG and anthropometric changes occurred for the VLCKD group.


    Source
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