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So I was going to bake my first bread....

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  • Jackie9003Jackie9003 Posts: 854Member, Greeter, Premium Member Posts: 854Member, Greeter, Premium Member
    Deleted my comment, I didn't realise the thread was 3yr old....
    edited October 2019
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Posts: 584Member Member Posts: 584Member Member
    Looks like the bakers have united and restored it. 😉
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,521Member Member Posts: 8,521Member Member
    just_Tomek wrote: »
    Anyone ready for the baking in the fall / winter months? Tomorrow I will be baking a loaf for the week. My fav simple crusty artisan loaf.

    @just_Tomek - yay! Yep - looking forward to new ideas for 🍁 baking! Can’t wait to see your artisanal loaf! I just made a 🌿 Rosemary loaf ...

    Happy baking! 👩🏼‍🍳

    Flour, water, yest, salt. All by weight. With some seeds mixed in.

    f8tlhjkdfcya.jpg
    edited October 2019
  • Safari_Gal_Safari_Gal_ Posts: 584Member Member Posts: 584Member Member
    [/quote]

    Flour, water, yest, salt. All by weight. With some seeds mixed in.
    i15aro3zpep0.jpeg


    @just_Tomek - wow!!! Looks amazing in all its crispy goodness!! Love that you included seeds. A friend just gave me this bottle of herbs and seed- 😋 I’ve been putting it on everything! 🥖

    f8tlhjkdfcya.jpg
    [/quote]
    edited October 2019
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,521Member Member Posts: 8,521Member Member

    This is only 1/4 of the batch of dough. The rest is in the fridge and will become buns, baguettes etc. as the week goes on.
    edited October 2019
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 14,254Member Member Posts: 14,254Member Member
    just_Tomek wrote: »

    This is only 1/4 of the batch of dough. The rest is in the fridge and will become buns, baguettes etc. as the week goes on.

    What are the really dark bits: Is that some kind of seed, too, or something else? (I'm not a big bread person, but that one looks really good - I like the way that texture looks!)
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,521Member Member Posts: 8,521Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    just_Tomek wrote: »

    This is only 1/4 of the batch of dough. The rest is in the fridge and will become buns, baguettes etc. as the week goes on.

    What are the really dark bits: Is that some kind of seed, too, or something else? (I'm not a big bread person, but that one looks really good - I like the way that texture looks!)

    Ohhhh thats couple of dates chopped in there. I figures since I added the seeds, why not add something sweet to it as well. Just spread some nice grass fed butter and it was simply divine.
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,521Member Member Posts: 8,521Member Member
    My last loaf of 2019 many more in
    2020. Sliced up and into the freezer. Each slice is roughly 26g so couple slices 120cal

    yw9emrox1mid.jpg



  • debgear1debgear1 Posts: 11Member Member Posts: 11Member Member
    Haven't bought any commercial bread products since mid October. Goal is to ditch that category for 2020. It just tastes so much better! Having fun with whole grains and stuff like spelt and einkorn. I am becoming a bit of a bread nerd. 😁
  • debgear1debgear1 Posts: 11Member Member Posts: 11Member Member
    Your loaf is beautiful, by the way!
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,633Member Member Posts: 21,633Member Member
    I bought rye flour for a cookie recipe which seemed kind of pointless so next time I will just use regular flour, and went looking for a part rye bread or rye rolls recipe and found this:

    https://www.177milkstreet.com/recipes/pumpkin-seed-rolls

    Pumpkin-Seed-Rolls.jpg

    I started around 1 PM and thought they would be done way before dinner but there were three rises and other sitting time, so they were actually done cooling just 15 minutes before dinner.

    Next time I'm not going to toast the 1/2 cup of seeds that goes on the top as that came out a little over done. And I could only get 1/4 C to stick, so will reduce to that next time.

    My mother, brother, and I really like them, but my OH did not like the salt flakes on the top and felt that overall they were too pretzel-like. I'm tempted to hunt down that pretzel loaf recipe from a few pages back to show him what pretzel-bread really is :lol:

    I like rolls - they are easier for me to moderate as I can freeze a lot of them.
  • WomanvsweightWomanvsweight Posts: 258Member Member Posts: 258Member Member
    Find a recipe for low calorie bread?
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,633Member Member Posts: 21,633Member Member
    peleroja wrote: »
    fishshark wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    Bought the book. Photos on amazon easily convinced me haha :)

    right?! its one of those beautiful books that even if you don't use it its so pretty. I keep it propped up in my kitchen next to my kitchen aid haha! I for sure recommend using it though!

    Confession: I have a bit of open shelving in my kitchen and the books I have stored there are not the ones I use most often, but the prettiest ones. Haha. Larousse Gastronomique just sits there looking shiny and golden for months sometimes while I'm digging my ratty old Joy of Cooking out of a cabinet.

    My "Joy of Cooking" is definitely the rattiest book in my collection, and it's the version from this century ;) I gave my mom my earlier version and she also has a version or two before that.

    I have too many cookbooks I don't use so now order them from my library system and take them for a test drive first.

    I've just put "Flour Water Salt Yeast" on hold.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,633Member Member Posts: 21,633Member Member
    My uncle is into flat bread and my mom wants to try making it. I think I will try this pita bread tomorrow, only I am going to cook it on the stovetop in a cast iron pan rather than the oven, as I'm too cheap to preheat for an hour at 500 degrees.

    Pita-Bread.jpg

    https://www.177milkstreet.com/recipes/pita-bread

    4 tablespoons grapeseed or other neutral oil, divided
    175 grams (1¼ cups) bread flour, plus extra for dusting
    175 grams (1¼ cups) whole-wheat flour
    2 1/4 teaspoons instant yeast
    2 teaspoons white sugar
    3/4 cup warm water (100°F to 110°F), plus more if needed
    1/4 cup plain whole-milk yogurt
    2 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt

    Coat a medium bowl with 1 teaspoon of the oil; set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook, add both flours, the yeast and sugar. Mix on low until combined, about 5 seconds. Add the water, yogurt and 2 tablespoons of the oil. Mix on low until a smooth ball forms, about 3 minutes. Feel the dough; it should be slightly sticky. If not, add water 1½ teaspoons at a time (no more than 2 tablespoons total), mixing after each addition, until slightly sticky. Let rest in the mixer bowl for 5 minutes.

    Add the salt and knead on low until smooth and pliable, 10 minutes. Transfer to the prepared bowl, forming it into a ball and turning to coat with oil. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in a warm, draft-free area until well risen but not quite doubled in volume, 1 to 1½ hours.

    Dust a rimmed baking sheet evenly with bread flour. Transfer the dough to the counter. Using a dough scraper or bench knife, divide the dough into 10 pieces (about 2 ounces each). Form each into a tight ball and place on the prepared baking sheet. Brush each ball with ½ teaspoon of the remaining oil, then cover with a damp kitchen towel. Let rise in a warm, draft-free area until well risen but not quite doubled, 30 to 60 minutes. Meanwhile, heat the oven to 500°F with a baking steel or stone on the upper-middle rack.

    Lightly dust two rimmed baking sheets with bread flour and lightly dust the counter. Place a dough ball on the counter; use a lightly floured rolling pin to roll the ball into a round ⅛ inch thick and 5½ inches in diameter. Set on one of the prepared baking sheets. Repeat with the remaining dough balls, placing them in a single layer on the baking sheets. Cover with a damp kitchen towel and let rest for 10 minutes.

    Lightly dust a peel with bread flour, then place 2 dough rounds on the peel without flipping them. Working quickly, open the oven and slide the rounds onto the baking steel. Immediately close the door. Bake until the breads have puffed and are light golden brown, about 3 minutes. Using the peel, remove the breads from the oven. Transfer to a wire rack and cover with a dry kitchen towel. Repeat with the remaining dough rounds. Serve warm or room temperature.

    Store leftover pita in a zip-close bag for up to a day; to wrap the pitas in foil and heat for 4 minutes at 300°F.

    Tip: Don’t forget to heat the baking steel or stone for a full hour before baking. And do cover the pita breads with a towel when they come out of the oven to keep them soft.
    edited December 2019
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,521Member Member Posts: 8,521Member Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    peleroja wrote: »
    fishshark wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    Bought the book. Photos on amazon easily convinced me haha :)

    right?! its one of those beautiful books that even if you don't use it its so pretty. I keep it propped up in my kitchen next to my kitchen aid haha! I for sure recommend using it though!

    Confession: I have a bit of open shelving in my kitchen and the books I have stored there are not the ones I use most often, but the prettiest ones. Haha. Larousse Gastronomique just sits there looking shiny and golden for months sometimes while I'm digging my ratty old Joy of Cooking out of a cabinet.

    My "Joy of Cooking" is definitely the rattiest book in my collection, and it's the version from this century ;) I gave my mom my earlier version and she also has a version or two before that.

    I have too many cookbooks I don't use so now order them from my library system and take them for a test drive first.

    I've just put "Flour Water Salt Yeast" on hold.

    Highly recommended not just for the recipes but for the knowledge and detailed explanations of why and how.

  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,633Member Member Posts: 21,633Member Member
    Someone mentioned bread pudding a few pages back and I thought I'd share the Joy of Cooking Bread Pudding recipe I used after my mom cut up too much French bread for Christmas. I'm interested in savory bread pudding recipes others like.

    Notes:
    • I did not cut off the crusts.
    • I halved the recipe and cooked it for 40 minutes.
    • I cooked it in a 6 x 9 pan and used a 7 x 11 pan for the water bath.
    • I used dried cherries for the (optional) fruit, almond extract instead of vanilla, and cardamon for the cinnamon.
    • I didn't have quite enough milk - was 2 oz short (note that I halved the recipe) - and did not have the issue with excess liquid that the cook in the link below had.

    https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2008/03/classic-cookbooks-joy-of-cooking-bread-pudding-recipe.html
  • BarbaraHelen2013BarbaraHelen2013 Posts: 1,045Member Member Posts: 1,045Member Member
    Here’s a savoury bread pudding recipe that I’ve used a few times. I usually add more fresh tomatoes than it calls for, layering in the bread because I’m slightly obsessed with tomatoes! I adjust the liquid content down a little to compensate for the liquid released by the tomatoes during cooking.

    https://www.stephencooks.com/2005/08/_tomato_bread_p.html
    edited January 1
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,633Member Member Posts: 21,633Member Member
    Here’s a savoury bread pudding recipe that I’ve used a few times. I usually add more fresh tomatoes than it calls for, layering in the bread because I’m slightly obsessed with tomatoes! I adjust the liquid content down a little to compensate for the liquid released by the tomatoes during cooking.

    https://www.stephencooks.com/2005/08/_tomato_bread_p.html

    My OH's parents would have loved that! I might make that for my mom next summer during tomato season. I am not a big tomato fan, however, but thanks :)
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Posts: 21,633Member Member Posts: 21,633Member Member
    I made the pita bread I mentioned above on New Year's Day. It was good! I wanted no more than 100 calories per pita, so divided it into 16 portions instead of 10. I cooked 4 on the stove top and froze the remaining 12 after the first rise.

    I put 6 in the frig to defrost last night and cooked them today at my mother's. I cooked 2 on the stovetop and 4 in the oven, and have to say I did prefer the ones in the oven, which were also the only ones that puffed. I still didn't preheat the pan for an hour - I have a 14" cast iron pizza pan and only preheated it while the oven got up to temp. I cooked them for 3 minutes then flipped and cooked for another 1 min.

    My mother thought they were too salty. I had used the 2.5 teaspoons called for in the recipe. They were kind of salty, but I like salt :smiley:

    Next in the rotation is Portuguese Sweet Potato rolls.
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