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How to you tell someone they need to lose weight?

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Replies

  • NYCDutchess
    NYCDutchess Posts: 622 Member
    I'm in an online group with lots of bigger women, and their reaction to a doctor saying something about weight is "find another doctor". They are offended. "Don't doctors know I'm overweight?, you can be overweight and healthy". IDK what the answer is... A doctor looking out is shunned for trying to help... but not doing anything isn't good either...
  • moldar2007
    moldar2007 Posts: 1 Member
    My doctor told me "Keep smoking and being fat so you can make me lots of money in the future." and "You aren't that young, you are already half dead." Those two things woke me up into action.
  • PennWalker
    PennWalker Posts: 556 Member
    edited February 2017
    cathipa wrote: »
    I work in the medical field and at least 50% of my patients are overweight if not obese. It is a crisis in the US and most of the Westernized countries. We counsel them on smoking and alcohol, but what about weight? What is your reaction to someone or a medical practitioner telling you to lose weight? Most of the responses I get are eye rolls (and I'm very delicate about how I address it), but what would cause someone to wake up and understand that its more than just aesthetics and more about health in general. The majority of the ailments I see can be directly correlated with being overweight or obese. Any thoughts? Any one who has had this happen and actually take the advice and be a success story? TIA

    Since you're in the medical field, you can talk to people directly. You're not at a social event where you need to mind your own business or be polite. Health is your job. You might save somebody's life. Hearing the facts in the doctor's office is often what people need to wake up.

    That's what helped me. My doctor told me last summer I was at high risk of a heart attack or stroke due to my high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and being obese. I could not forget his matter of fact words -- and still can't. I lost weight, began to exercise every day, changed my diet, and am a much healthier person now. Just give people the facts. What they do about it is up to them.

  • CipherZero
    CipherZero Posts: 1,418 Member
    cathipa wrote: »
    I work in the medical field and at least 50% of my patients are overweight if not obese. It is a crisis in the US and most of the Westernized countries. We counsel them on smoking and alcohol, but what about weight?

    "Your current body fat levels are correlated with increased risk of {insert chronic diseased states / sick aging phenotypes}. If you'd like help with reducing your body fat and risk, I can write you a referral."
    cathipa wrote: »
    What is your reaction to someone or a medical practitioner telling you to lose weight? Most of the responses I get are eye rolls (and I'm very delicate about how I address it), but what would cause someone to wake up and understand that its more than just aesthetics and more about health in general. The majority of the ailments I see can be directly correlated with being overweight or obese. Any thoughts? Any one who has had this happen and actually take the advice and be a success story? TIA

    Realistically, your job as a doctor is to inform the patient to your findings and prescribe as needed - whether the prescription is merely rest, antibiotics, chemotherapy, or exercise and nutrition.

    There is also where your obligation ends. You can no more make a patient move more and eat less any more than you can made a type II diabetic lower their raw sugar intake, or get an asthmatic give up smoking.
  • nvmomketo
    nvmomketo Posts: 12,019 Member
    I was told my midsection was obese but a very thorough but very blunt doctor. I'm pretty sure he has Aspergers. He reminds me of the doctor on House, on;y less mean and more blunt.

    I was shocked. I knew I was overweight and getting an apple shape but to have my midsection called obese was a real eye opener. It helped spur me on to follow his low carb advice.

    I was a bit annoyed when he still called me midsection obese after I'd lost 30 lbs, was a normal BMI and a size 10. At that point it was some fat, but it is also loose and stretched out skin from having three children and getting as fat as 190 lbs (at only 5'8"). Skin doesn't bounce back as well in middle age, for me. Bikini days are gone. LOL

    I would be blunt. "You are obese and that can cause A, B and C. To help yourself try D, E and / or F."
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    I'm in an online group with lots of bigger women, and their reaction to a doctor saying something about weight is "find another doctor". They are offended. "Don't doctors know I'm overweight?, you can be overweight and healthy". IDK what the answer is... A doctor looking out is shunned for trying to help... but not doing anything isn't good either...

    Well this is truly sad state of affairs.
  • DonaGail
    DonaGail Posts: 190 Member
    edited February 2017
    My doctor told me that I was about to fall off of a cliff and my obesity related health problems were going to really start damaging me. Oh and speaking of being blunt, I just had a plastic surgeon tell me to "quit being a *kitten*" because I wear a band over a big painful scar on my arm. That actually made me laugh.
  • cqbkaju
    cqbkaju Posts: 1,011 Member
    "You are overweight." seems simple enough.
  • Gallowmere1984
    Gallowmere1984 Posts: 6,626 Member
    cqbkaju wrote: »
    "You are overweight." seems simple enough.

    Yes, because I am sure that most people who are overweight, to the point of it threatening their health, are blissfully unaware. The point is, a lot of people don't seem to realize how damaging it can be, until they are given a T2D diagnosis.
  • DietPrada
    DietPrada Posts: 1,171 Member
    I'm in an online group with lots of bigger women, and their reaction to a doctor saying something about weight is "find another doctor". They are offended. "Don't doctors know I'm overweight?, you can be overweight and healthy". IDK what the answer is... A doctor looking out is shunned for trying to help... but not doing anything isn't good either...

    These people are just living in denial. Just because they don't want to hear it doesn't mean it's not a Doctor's place to tell them. Not "oh you're fat" but "carrying this much extra weight increases your risk of ..." - focusing on the health issue. I've been a big girl - morbidly obese at one point (123kg and 5'9") but I can't handle people who carry on about being big and healthy. Sorry but no, you're not. That excess body fat does effect your health, even if you are currently young enough not to be feeling the long term effects ... yet.
  • Therealobi1
    Therealobi1 Posts: 3,261 Member
    My nurse was the one who told me I was obese. She told me to control my portions and get in 30 mins of exercise a day just by walking, She told me many of issues I was experiencing would go if I lost weight
    I really didn't pay much attention to her, I thought I was just stressed and overworked
    Along came group holiday and I decided to lose weight for that. Now I am less tired, blood pressure fine, no daily heart burn...
    She was right I just wasn't listening to her.
  • Azdak
    Azdak Posts: 8,281 Member
    There are different stages of readiness for change. If someone is in one of the early changes, there is not much you can do except try to move them down the path a little.

    Since this is kind of my job, I try to take a practical approach. First of all, I always treat people with respect and I try to assess where they are in terms of both readiness for change and having the knowledge/tools to effect change.

    I have one advantage in that I am not some 20-something athlete who has always been 10%-15% body fat. I know exactly what it is like to struggle with job stress, busy schedules, physical issues, stress eating, you name it. So I can give them practical tips and tools, based on both research and personal experience.

    I never talk down to people. They know they are overweight, and they often know in general what they need to do. So I talk to them with empathy and support. I acknowledge their challenges and struggles. Even if I know they are probably not ready to fully commit, I give them straight, matter-of-fact reasons why losing weight can improve their health, backed by research and presented in a way that emphasizes the practical benefits for them individually.

    I do hit the exercise component hard. I do that because, even if they cannot lose a substantial amount of weight right now, they can improve their fitness. I know that with almost 100% certainty. And regular exercise will improve their overall health, regardless of whether they lose any weight. Sometimes the increased self confidence and self esteem that comes with feeling more fit can be just the catalyst to push them to take their diet more seriously.