Running is so Hard!!!

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Replies

  • lgordon1028
    lgordon1028 Posts: 6 Member
    I think Galloway run/walk has been mentioned but I highly recommend this method. I ran my first marathon (Big Sur, not easy) running for four minutes and walking one. I finished in 4:28 which was pretty good for first time. I'm not sure I would've made it or done as well if I had run the whole thing.
  • yancystreet
    yancystreet Posts: 38 Member
    As a few have mentioned - the run/walk method is what got me past the "I am going to die stage" when I first started.

    I started out running for 30 seconds, walking for 2-3 minutes. At first, I thought it was silly. but as I continued, the running time got greater and greater. Within a couple months I was running non-stop 30 minutes. Now I am at the point where I prefer run/walk - lessen injury chances, feel I can go longer, etc.

    Good luck to you!
  • Aordaz6
    Aordaz6 Posts: 3 Member
    1. I've been there as well. What I did to be able to run consistently was set check points for myself. If your track is 1 mile, set your own stop destination. Take a short break after each stop. Don't be ashamed if they aren't too far apart, the whole goal of setting check points is to fit your own current capability. Each week try running 2 minutes longer in order to progress.

    2. If your mouth tends to become dry, spit or swallow. I don't know if others do this, but when I run more intensely than I usally do, my mouth gets dry, which causes me to overheat. Spitting and swallowing has seemed to help me keep running.

    3. Set a pattern of breathing in through the nose, and out through the mouth. Focus on keeping the pattern and you will soon do it automically out of habit. This prevents you from becoming out of breath more than you may think.

    4. Turn on some music or day dream while running. If you focus on how much longer you need to run for, it will seem like a longer way to go. Allowing distractions helps with making the run seem shorter and less tiring.

    I hope these tips help you as much as they did to me!
  • PeterR147
    PeterR147 Posts: 1 Member
    About 5-6 months ago I tried to run a 5k with no training just through the neighbourhood. I do go to the gym but never actually ran outside much. I was puffed after 4-5 mins of slow running. 5 months later and I'm running around 20k a week, more on holidays, and enjoying doing 10k runs casually under an hour. You'll get there.
  • Theo166
    Theo166 Posts: 2,564 Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    You will be surprised how quickly it builds if you stick with it. Are you following a structured program, like a couch to 5k? Or are you just winging it?

    I'm just winging it.

    If you don't want to do C25K, maybe start with walking. I add intervals to my walking were I go one block fast and one regular speed. Walking will ensure you are getting measured exercise and a sense of accomplishment; you can slowly introduce jogging.

    I also tried starting with jogging but my joints hurt and I felt poor about what I could accomplish.
  • Slaci_Jo
    Slaci_Jo Posts: 69 Member
    toxikon wrote: »
    I think a lot of beginners run much too fast.

    Your main focus should be on your form, breathing and building distance. Speed comes with time.

    Run/jog slow enough that you'd be able to have a conversation with someone. Yes, that means that you'll be running slow enough that a fast walker could pass you.

    I'm just getting back into running and my pace is 8:40/km. Very very slow, but I can easily do a 5-6k and ENJOY it. I pay attention to my breathing, how my body feels and enjoy my music and the scenery.

    TDLR; SLOW DOWN!


    What this posted said is probably most important. But secondly, invest in good running shoes. Don't buy shoes because they are "cute" or match your favorite workout outfits. I've made that mistake, as most new runners or people starting to work out do.

    This first time I tried running, I was that girl. I went and bought the cutest pair of Reebok's I could find and like 5 cute workout outfits. I was out there running in my cute shoes and cute outfit, feelin myself. Then I got to like week 5 of C25k, and started getting shin splints. Tried to run through the shin splints for a couple weeks and seriously injured myself. At the time I figured it was because I was around 50-60 lbs overweight, which was part of it I'm sure, but I didn't even think it could possibly be my shoes. Wasn't until 5 years later that I would try my hand at running again.

    Fast forward 5 years, around November of 2016, and I started up C25k again. Still wearing my cute shoes, still wearing my cute outfits, and week 5 comes along and BAM shin splints. I didn;t feel out of breath or anything, just the shin splints were so bad that at one point I collapsed to the ground in tears because it hurt so much to even try to walk back home. I have a very knowledgeable boyfriend who suggested I try different shoes. We went to The Running Company, where they did a 20 second test of me running on a treadmill while they recorded, and then the sales person reviewed how I ran. She told me where my problem areas were and brought out 5 pairs of shoes for me to try. Each pair I had to run a lap around the building and compare how they felt, and there were significant differences between them all. And honestly, almost every pair was god awful in terms of "cuteness". The pair I ended up are far from cute, but I tell you what, I went back home and started up week 5 again and was able to make it through without shin splints. I ended up spending around $120 for a pair of Brook's Ravenna's, and it was the best decision ever. I'm running my first 5k in 3 weeks and have started on the C210k program.
  • MobyCarp
    MobyCarp Posts: 2,927 Member
    toxikon wrote: »
    I think a lot of beginners run much too fast.

    Your main focus should be on your form, breathing and building distance. Speed comes with time.

    Run/jog slow enough that you'd be able to have a conversation with someone. Yes, that means that you'll be running slow enough that a fast walker could pass you.

    I'm just getting back into running and my pace is 8:40/km. Very very slow, but I can easily do a 5-6k and ENJOY it. I pay attention to my breathing, how my body feels and enjoy my music and the scenery.

    TDLR; SLOW DOWN!


    What this posted said is probably most important. But secondly, invest in good running shoes. Don't buy shoes because they are "cute" or match your favorite workout outfits. I've made that mistake, as most new runners or people starting to work out do.

    This first time I tried running, I was that girl. I went and bought the cutest pair of Reebok's I could find and like 5 cute workout outfits. I was out there running in my cute shoes and cute outfit, feelin myself. Then I got to like week 5 of C25k, and started getting shin splints. Tried to run through the shin splints for a couple weeks and seriously injured myself. At the time I figured it was because I was around 50-60 lbs overweight, which was part of it I'm sure, but I didn't even think it could possibly be my shoes. Wasn't until 5 years later that I would try my hand at running again.

    Fast forward 5 years, around November of 2016, and I started up C25k again. Still wearing my cute shoes, still wearing my cute outfits, and week 5 comes along and BAM shin splints. I didn;t feel out of breath or anything, just the shin splints were so bad that at one point I collapsed to the ground in tears because it hurt so much to even try to walk back home. I have a very knowledgeable boyfriend who suggested I try different shoes. We went to The Running Company, where they did a 20 second test of me running on a treadmill while they recorded, and then the sales person reviewed how I ran. She told me where my problem areas were and brought out 5 pairs of shoes for me to try. Each pair I had to run a lap around the building and compare how they felt, and there were significant differences between them all. And honestly, almost every pair was god awful in terms of "cuteness". The pair I ended up are far from cute, but I tell you what, I went back home and started up week 5 again and was able to make it through without shin splints. I ended up spending around $120 for a pair of Brook's Ravenna's, and it was the best decision ever. I'm running my first 5k in 3 weeks and have started on the C210k program.

    Pretty is as pretty does. I've been known to tell a lady who complained that her shoes hurt, but that they were SO cute, "If the shoes hurt, they're butt-ugly."

    As a guy, I always wanted muted shoes. In the era of white running shoes, when I wasn't a runner, I'd find the grey or blue pair to buy to walk in. As a beginning runner 5 years ago, I lamented that all the shoe colors were just too loud. Now I'm a distance runner. I demand shoes that work for me. I know the model that works for me, and I'll buy 3 pair to put into rotation. I want 3 different colors, so I can tell them apart; but I'll buy the 3 cheapest colors available online. It doesn't freakin' matter what color the shoes are. It matters that I can run in them without hurting myself.
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    jgnatca wrote: »
    Orphia wrote: »

    My only other tip just now is to run slow! Most beginners run flat out (I did). There's no need. Run at a pace that feels like you can run forever.

    I am a big fan of C25K. Just a question Orphia...why do you suggest the above? So that you avoid injury? So that you don't overdo it and feel defeated? If you can complete each session at a decent pace, why wouldn't you?

    Not criticising (you can run 30k now, so your method clearly works). I am keen to understand your reasoning so I can learn from it.

    Thanks....

    There are three systems you are training when beginning to run. The first is the cardiovascular system, which is fastest to respond and is the most critical. I was most pleased to see how quickly the body responds to new demands; every week I noted improvement.

    The second system is the muscles. The body builders on the forum here can testify that it takes time for the muscles to get stronger.

    And finally, there's the joints and tendons. They take the longest to adapt and you really want to avoid injury. It can take months to recover if you try and run through tendon damage.

    Just like a body builder you want to build up slowly and progressively to allow all three systems to support each other.

    What amazes me is that your body will actually build and develop new capillary beds to increase blood flow to the now needed muscles. Incredible how quickly our bodies adapt to changes.
  • silico
    silico Posts: 88 Member
    It gets easier, much easier, after a few weeks when you start to adjust.

    When I started I could barely do a minute and a half, but at my peak I could do a good solid 40 minutes.

    Couch to 5K app on your phone is a great way to build up from nothing (search for C25K).
  • felixbean
    felixbean Posts: 1 Member
    I went on my first run the other day and was dying. I live a sedentary life style so I wasn't surprised at how hard I struggled but I literally could not run consistently for more than a minute at most. I am determined to become more fit and plan to make running apart of my weekly routine but what can I do to become more motivated and easier??

    If you have any suggestions or words of encouragement that would be great
    I went on my first run the other day and was dying. I live a sedentary life style so I wasn't surprised at how hard I struggled but I literally could not run consistently for more than a minute at most. I am determined to become more fit and plan to make running apart of my weekly routine but what can I do to become more motivated and easier??

    If you have any suggestions or words of encouragement that would be great

    Darling try the 10k app. It starts in a easy way and build you up. Can only recommend it ☺ go girl
  • carolinelanewa
    carolinelanewa Posts: 42 Member
    Please go slowly and dont run to far to start. I went in all gun home. Ended up with stress fracture in knee. Got clearance to run then got shin splints. Got clearance and have been told walk 3 min then run two min. Have done this for 3 weeks. Now i run 2 and walk 2. Few weeks of that then up the run part. Frustrating but thats the way it is. And I was fit to start with.