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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • French_Peasant
    French_Peasant Posts: 1,638 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    The chili recipe I always used didn't have ground chili in it. We have two different kinds of Paprika though, one is mild and the other spicy, so maybe the spicy Paprika is more or less the saem as your gorund chili.

    Different flavor profile. I have both paprika and a selection of ground chili pepper (ancho, cayenne, Aleppo, and chipotle) (as well as chili powder) and they don't taste the same

    Unfortunately those don't grow here so we have to make do. Fresh chilis and spicy paprika powder, cumin, cilantro, oregano.
    We only get cayenne powder from those. Anything more special I'd have to buy from a specialty shop online, which would be a tad expensive.

    Here is a simpler Texas-style recipe (although I have not tried it...as noted above I make white chicken chili) that might translate better for a European. http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes/Classic-Chili-Con-Carne

    I believe you can substitute cayennes for the two chiles listed here, although I think you would want to whole pepper so you could do the puree it calls for.

    If you like chili, you could grow peppers in your garden next year. They are excellent for a small plot.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    yes. Powered chili should be pure chili pepper, dried and ground. "Chili powder" should specifically be a powder for use in the prepared dish, "chili."

    and the oregano in it has to be Mexican oregano (sometimes called "wild marjoram"). Mediterranean oregano does not work with the chilis and cumin the same way.

    Here we have oregano and marjoram. It is not called wild though. Would it be what you call wild?

    Nope. Marjoram and Oregano are kissing cousins and are both members of the mint family. Mexican oregano (wild marjoram) is a completely different species unrelated to the mints. The botanical name is Lippia graveolens and it is actually related to verbena.

    In just to thank you for going to the Latin name - the only sane way to talk about plants.

    Maybe we need Latin names for stuff like pasta/noodles. ;)

    I grew up with a German/English mother and an Italian father.

    Egg noodles were noodles and noodles made without eggs but in that shape were noodles. Tagliatele wasn't a thing when I was a kid, so that didn't muck up the works. That, however, is pasta. Don't ask. Spaetzle were spaetzle.

    Anything made without egg in any other shape was pasta.

    If something was made specificially for Asian cuisine, it was a noodle.

    If something was made specifically for Italian cuisine, but was in the same shape as the Asian cuisine, it was pasta.

    I don't care if any of this makes sense.

    Thus, if I eat rice spaghetti because I have to thanks to my celiac disease, I'm eating pasta.

    If I buy a similar product specifically to use in an Asian dish, they're rice noodles.

    Again, I don't care if this makes sense. :p
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    I like butter, and I like coffee. But the 2 together is just...wrong
  • NickleArse
    NickleArse Posts: 15 Member
    NickleArse wrote: »
    3bambi3 wrote: »
    NickleArse wrote: »
    I should clarify all of this by saying I don't buy Asprey's proprietary ingredients to make my BP coffee, it's jsut espresso, butter and coconut oil
    jdlobb wrote: »

    whats the point of adding butter to the coffee? seems like unnecessary calories to me. coffee is just fine as-is.

    I've done keto diet with and without bullet proof coffee, I get a lot less of the negative side effects of keto when I consume BP coffee
    J72FIT wrote: »

    How exactly...?

    helps me hit super low calories (on keto) whilst still feeling super energetic

    Bulletproof coffee helped you keep your calories low?

    I only consume 20g of fat or 180 cals

    keto has been shown to decease appetite and improve satiety on low calorie diets

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25402637

    and i find BP coffee allows me to more strictly adhere to low calorie diets and not suffer any keto flu or lethargy normally associated with massive calorie deficits

    For you. Decreases appetite for you. I have zero desire to do the keto thing. And I have even less desire to eat very low calorie, which isn't advised for the vast majority of people.

    You have you BP coffee and i'll be over here with my regular coffee and porridge.

    this is an unpopular opinions thread right?
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    edited September 2017
    Anyone got a good American chili recipe? I think I'm gonna order some ancho chili, lol.

    Mine:

    2 lb beef (roast or stew meat cut into bite sized pieces preferred but can be made with ground beef)
    1 large or 2 medium yellow onions, diced
    4-6 cloves garlic (minced)
    several stalks celery, sliced
    1 large green bell pepper, diced
    2 - 28oz cans diced tomatoes
    12 oz tomato paste
    2/3 cup regular (not hot) chile powder
    (or: 1/2 c. powdered ancho chile, 2 Tbl Mexican Oregano, 2 Tbl ground cumin)
    1/4 c. Worchestershire sauce
    Hot chile peppers to taste
    water or tomato juice as needed for preferred consistency.
    Yes, you can add kidney or black beans if you want, but this is Texas-style chili

    I make this in my crock pot so I just dump everything and cook it on low for 8-12 hours (brown the meat if using ground beef). If you want to do it on the stovetop, brown the meat with the onions in a little bit of oil. Add remaining ingredients and let simmer until the meat is tender and flavors are well mingled.

  • jessiferrrb
    jessiferrrb Posts: 1,758 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    @piperdown44
    I should tell my co-workers that I'm entering the chili contest with a chili made of fruit and seeds and record their reactions.

    If it has beans it's not chili. It's stew.

    If it doesn't have beans it's not chili, it's hot dog or pasta sauce.

    Texas chili has no beans in it.

    Texas chili looks like Goulash.

    Hold up.

    I was raised by a West Virginia-born Pennsylvania-raised mom and she called goulash a recipe of tomato sauce, hamburger meat, pepper and onion poured over macaroni noodles.

    We are so weirdly wonderfully diverse.

    Goulash has chunks of meat and a spicy sauce, mostly eaten with pasta apparently but I don't like that, rather potatoes. When I googled Texan chili it looked basically like that.

    this is probably waaaaaay late but i always understood goulash from a czech ex boyfriend and it was always meat chunks, usually venison i think (pescetarian so i don't pay that much attention), in a creamy paprika sauce with dumplings. my current boyfriend also makes a goulash, but i think it's just a mess of stuff in a pot and ineptly named (tuna, beans, cheese, noodles, relish, mayo, mustard, onions, peppers, horseradish). it's a MESS. but kinda tasty. maybe it's a chili!


    j/k y'all.
  • NickleArse
    NickleArse Posts: 15 Member
    to everyone saying that fats + coffee sounds gross, I think they look gorgeous :)

    14fXnNt.jpg
  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Bry_Lander wrote: »
    Bry_Lander wrote: »
    I witnessed cake culturalism yesterday. I attended a meeting where one of the participants brought in donuts for his birthday, and wow, were people ever excited. People were coming and going from the meeting, and those joining late were told that it was Joe's birthday and that they better get a donut before it was too late.

    Being a guest and an unfamiliar face, I was asked to get a donut maybe 4-5 times by different people. Towards lunch, there seemed to be some anxiety that I was going to experience deep regret if I didn't claim a donut for myself. It didn't fit into my eating plan yesterday so I politely declined and no one overtly judged me. It seemed like maybe some felt sorry for me because I didn't know what I was missing and that I was foolishly declining an amazing opportunity, as if I was rejecting some rare and exotic food that I would never have the chance to experience again.

    I have several more meetings scheduled with this group in the future, so I think that I will just put a donut on a plate, cover it with a napkin, and leave it on the table during the meeting. I think that will make certain people feel better.

    This is hilarious--I am cracking up over this. Were they, like, Dunkin Donuts, or were they actually something special? Because if they were comparable to the doughnuts known as "Amish Crack" around here, I can understand the concern that you experience the awesomeness.

    Krispy Kreme - good donuts, but not exactly life-changing.

    Now there is an unpopular opinion.

    I hate Krispy Kreme donuts. To be fair, I don't care for donuts in general but I think they are the absolute worst I've ever had.

    I do too, but I was told they are different warm out of the oven, which admittedly we don't get here.



    Right out of the vat? They're pretty good, but not great. Other than that? They're OK, at best.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    yes. Powered chili should be pure chili pepper, dried and ground. "Chili powder" should specifically be a powder for use in the prepared dish, "chili."

    and the oregano in it has to be Mexican oregano (sometimes called "wild marjoram"). Mediterranean oregano does not work with the chilis and cumin the same way.

    Here we have oregano and marjoram. It is not called wild though. Would it be what you call wild?

    Nope. Marjoram and Oregano are kissing cousins and are both members of the mint family. Mexican oregano (wild marjoram) is a completely different species unrelated to the mints. The botanical name is Lippia graveolens and it is actually related to verbena.

    In just to thank you for going to the Latin name - the only sane way to talk about plants.

    Maybe we need Latin names for stuff like pasta/noodles. ;)

    I grew up with a German/English mother and an Italian father.

    Egg noodles were noodles and noodles made without eggs but in that shape were noodles. Tagliatele wasn't a thing when I was a kid, so that didn't muck up the works. That, however, is pasta. Don't ask. Spaetzle were spaetzle.

    Anything made without egg in any other shape was pasta.

    If something was made specificially for Asian cuisine, it was a noodle.

    If something was made specifically for Italian cuisine, but was in the same shape as the Asian cuisine, it was pasta.

    I don't care if any of this makes sense.

    Thus, if I eat rice spaghetti because I have to thanks to my celiac disease, I'm eating pasta.

    If I buy a similar product specifically to use in an Asian dish, they're rice noodles.

    Again, I don't care if this makes sense. :p

    But Italian pasta is made with egg? Just different grades/types of flour to Asian noodles. Or some Asian noodles are made with rice but i'd call that a rice noodle. But mostly this aligns with me. Tagliatelle is just a shape of pasta. And yah, spaetzle is spaetzle though not something I think I've seen in a supermarket here (not that I've looked admittedly).
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,990 Member
    Speziface wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Speziface wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Winter squash good (had my first of the season yesterday, delicata, although I have a pumpkin and a butternut ready to be prepared), pumpkin spice bad, other than in a pie on Thanksgiving. There's really nothing objectively bad about the mix of spices called pumpkin spice but that they are so overdone this time of the year, probably, so I admit to being curmudgeonly.

    Bringing us back round to Thanksgiving and in particular my vested interested in the Canadian one, my best friend is indeed resuming her hosting of a big feed and it shall be happening in two weeks. I get to get my pumpkin pie on. I laughed when she asked me today if I could make it. Psychic.

    IMO pumpkin pie is one of those things that must be made with fresh pumpkin rather than canned. It's a totally different taste.

    I've tried fresh a couple of times, and found the results awful. Also more work. Not trying again.

    I have to disagree; it's totally worth the trouble.

    Get the pie/sugar pumpkins; they're about the size of a cantelope. Quarter them, remove the seeds, brush lightly with olive oil, and bake at 350 until soft. Let them cool completely then puree the meat (NOT the skins). Measure 15oz at a time into containers and freeze until ready to use. It'll keep about six months. (I did my T-day pumpkin prep last weekend. B) )

    That's what I did, except the freezing. I even grew the bleepin' pie pumpkin.

    I encourage others to try it. It was fun. I hope they'll succeed, and be delighted. But my pie was Not Good, so I personally will not do it again. Ever.

    I reported my sad, sad story in case someone else has similar results, so that they need not feel lonely and pathetic . . . maybe just pathetic.

    I'd happily eat a slice of your delicious, delicious pie, though. ;)

    I don't have a fancy recipe; I just substitute in my pumpkin for the canned stuff in the traditional Libby's recipe. And I use Marie Calender's frozen pie crusts. It's pretty simple, and the fresh pumpkin makes a huge difference.

    Fresh pumpkin, yet you use the frozen crust? SMH.

    ;););)
  • NEOHgirl
    NEOHgirl Posts: 237 Member
    [quote=If I'm going to have something greasy, I want melted cheese involved.[/quote]

    Or bacon.
  • TR0berts
    TR0berts Posts: 7,739 Member
    Ruatine wrote: »
    @VintageFeline, Texans just think they're the inventers of things like chili and the interwebz.

    To be fair, most historians will trace it back to Mexico, with the earliest known recipes showing up in TX. (http://www.nationalchiliday.com/chili-history.html#.WcUqdrJ97RY , https://www.uspca.com/2014/04/who-invented-chili/? , http://www.chilicookoff.com/history/history_of_chili.asp )


    I'm another who doesn't find KK appealing. Of course, when I say I like Dunkin Donuts a lot of people look at me like I grew a second head, but, hey, I like their Boston Kreme.

    DD Boston Kreme? No can defend. /miyagi
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    yes. Powered chili should be pure chili pepper, dried and ground. "Chili powder" should specifically be a powder for use in the prepared dish, "chili."

    and the oregano in it has to be Mexican oregano (sometimes called "wild marjoram"). Mediterranean oregano does not work with the chilis and cumin the same way.

    Here we have oregano and marjoram. It is not called wild though. Would it be what you call wild?

    Nope. Marjoram and Oregano are kissing cousins and are both members of the mint family. Mexican oregano (wild marjoram) is a completely different species unrelated to the mints. The botanical name is Lippia graveolens and it is actually related to verbena.

    In just to thank you for going to the Latin name - the only sane way to talk about plants.

    Maybe we need Latin names for stuff like pasta/noodles. ;)

    I grew up with a German/English mother and an Italian father.

    Egg noodles were noodles and noodles made without eggs but in that shape were noodles. Tagliatele wasn't a thing when I was a kid, so that didn't muck up the works. That, however, is pasta. Don't ask. Spaetzle were spaetzle.

    Anything made without egg in any other shape was pasta.

    If something was made specificially for Asian cuisine, it was a noodle.

    If something was made specifically for Italian cuisine, but was in the same shape as the Asian cuisine, it was pasta.

    I don't care if any of this makes sense.

    Thus, if I eat rice spaghetti because I have to thanks to my celiac disease, I'm eating pasta.

    If I buy a similar product specifically to use in an Asian dish, they're rice noodles.

    Again, I don't care if this makes sense. :p

    But Italian pasta is made with egg? Just different grades/types of flour to Asian noodles. Or some Asian noodles are made with rice but i'd call that a rice noodle. But mostly this aligns with me. Tagliatelle is just a shape of pasta. And yah, spaetzle is spaetzle though not something I think I've seen in a supermarket here (not that I've looked admittedly).

    None of what I said is supposed to make any sense. I have warring grandmothers and great aunts in my head.
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    NickleArse wrote: »
    to everyone saying that fats + coffee sounds gross, I think they look gorgeous :)

    14fXnNt.jpg

    Dude, I have a pukey migraine today. Honestly, that was the last thing I needed to look at or imagine smelling right now.

    Caveat: I don't even like coffee.
  • Speziface
    Speziface Posts: 1,687 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Speziface wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Speziface wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    Winter squash good (had my first of the season yesterday, delicata, although I have a pumpkin and a butternut ready to be prepared), pumpkin spice bad, other than in a pie on Thanksgiving. There's really nothing objectively bad about the mix of spices called pumpkin spice but that they are so overdone this time of the year, probably, so I admit to being curmudgeonly.

    Bringing us back round to Thanksgiving and in particular my vested interested in the Canadian one, my best friend is indeed resuming her hosting of a big feed and it shall be happening in two weeks. I get to get my pumpkin pie on. I laughed when she asked me today if I could make it. Psychic.

    IMO pumpkin pie is one of those things that must be made with fresh pumpkin rather than canned. It's a totally different taste.

    I've tried fresh a couple of times, and found the results awful. Also more work. Not trying again.

    I have to disagree; it's totally worth the trouble.

    Get the pie/sugar pumpkins; they're about the size of a cantelope. Quarter them, remove the seeds, brush lightly with olive oil, and bake at 350 until soft. Let them cool completely then puree the meat (NOT the skins). Measure 15oz at a time into containers and freeze until ready to use. It'll keep about six months. (I did my T-day pumpkin prep last weekend. B) )

    That's what I did, except the freezing. I even grew the bleepin' pie pumpkin.

    I encourage others to try it. It was fun. I hope they'll succeed, and be delighted. But my pie was Not Good, so I personally will not do it again. Ever.

    I reported my sad, sad story in case someone else has similar results, so that they need not feel lonely and pathetic . . . maybe just pathetic.

    I'd happily eat a slice of your delicious, delicious pie, though. ;)

    I don't have a fancy recipe; I just substitute in my pumpkin for the canned stuff in the traditional Libby's recipe. And I use Marie Calender's frozen pie crusts. It's pretty simple, and the fresh pumpkin makes a huge difference.

    Fresh pumpkin, yet you use the frozen crust? SMH.

    ;););)

    I completely agree. But in my pie, at least, the crust is a tertiary component behind the pumpkin and the spices.

    Not to say I can't make a decent crust from scratch, but when I'm cooking for T-day I don't usually don't bother unless it's a simple graham cracker crust.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    Around here, "noodles" is an all-encompassing term and includes Asian noodles, pasta, egg noodles, Spaetzle, etc.

    And was the cause of much confusion in my adolescent mind when watching US TV shows (mostly Friends TBH) when lasagne is being made but noodles being references. SO confused.

    I grew up in a small town with heavy German/Northern European influence so "noodles" usually meant wide egg noodles. As my horizons expanded, so did the things that were included as noodles. We made lasagna with lasagna noodles that were pasta. We made macaroni and cheese with noodles that were pasta. Many made schnitzel with a side of noodles that were Spaetzel.

    That seems very convoluted. Macaroni/lasagne sheets etc would be types/shapes of pasta. Now you're all throwing extraneous words into the mix.

    It's interesting that moving beyond a European grounding (where pasta is from) caused the calling of pasta to morph into noodles.

    I actually think it's that a lot of Americans ran into noodles from a central European background first, and knew only a limited selection of pasta (which some apparently called macaroni in all forms, although we did not).

    When I was growing up, you had noodles, which were egg noodles, or spaghetti, or lasagne noodles. Pasta as a general term was not used. I don't recall noodles with Chinese food from when I was young, but later had it with Japanese food (nice restaurant in town was Japanese) and then was exposed to it (late high school) in Chinese and Thai.

    I now think of pasta as Italian and noodles as everything else, although I'd tend to agree that noodles is the generic.

    That said, chili shouldn't be put on spaghetti, that's a weird Cincinnati thing. (Joking, mostly.)

    Pretty close in the history points, for me, too (US Great Lakes region, rural). I'd add that the first people to start talking about "pasta" were perceived by some others as a little full of themselves and "fancy".

    Same region, also small town in the middle of farm country. Noodles were what you put in your chicken soup or goulash, spaghetti was spaghetti, macaroni was elbow macaroni and that was it. First heard of pasta when I went away to college in the mid 70's and learned about all the different kinds when I moved to a big city with a large Italian influence.
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