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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    I probably would, I've eaten other "exotic" meats so it would be foolish not to. I draw the line at rats, insects, eyeballs and testicles.

    I'm not sure raccoon and rats are all that different.
  • J72FIT
    J72FIT Posts: 5,932 Member
    edited September 2017
    NickleArse wrote: »
    I should clarify all of this by saying I don't buy Asprey's proprietary ingredients to make my BP coffee, it's jsut espresso, butter and coconut oil
    jdlobb wrote: »

    whats the point of adding butter to the coffee? seems like unnecessary calories to me. coffee is just fine as-is.

    I've done keto diet with and without bullet proof coffee, I get a lot less of the negative side effects of keto when I consume BP coffee
    J72FIT wrote: »

    How exactly...?

    helps me hit super low calories (on keto) whilst still feeling super energetic

    By blunting your appetite I imagine.

    Lol, just saw the comment I missed. Call me late to the party.

    I tried bullet proof coffee a while back. Was not for me. If it works for you great.

  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    edited September 2017
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    yes. Powered chili should be pure chili pepper, dried and ground. "Chili powder" should specifically be a powder for use in the prepared dish, "chili."

    and the oregano in it has to be Mexican oregano (sometimes called "wild marjoram"). Mediterranean oregano does not work with the chilis and cumin the same way.

    Here we have oregano and marjoram. It is not called wild though. Would it be what you call wild?

    Nope. Marjoram and Oregano are kissing cousins and are both members of the mint family. Mexican oregano (wild marjoram) is a completely different species unrelated to the mints. The botanical name is Lippia graveolens and it is actually related to verbena.

    In just to thank you for going to the Latin name - the only sane way to talk about plants.

    Maybe we need Latin names for stuff like pasta/noodles. ;)

    I grew up with a German/English mother and an Italian father.

    Egg noodles were noodles and noodles made without eggs but in that shape were noodles. Tagliatele wasn't a thing when I was a kid, so that didn't muck up the works. That, however, is pasta. Don't ask. Spaetzle were spaetzle.

    Anything made without egg in any other shape was pasta.

    If something was made specificially for Asian cuisine, it was a noodle.

    If something was made specifically for Italian cuisine, but was in the same shape as the Asian cuisine, it was pasta.

    I don't care if any of this makes sense.

    Thus, if I eat rice spaghetti because I have to thanks to my celiac disease, I'm eating pasta.

    If I buy a similar product specifically to use in an Asian dish, they're rice noodles.

    Again, I don't care if this makes sense. :p

    But Italian pasta is made with egg? Just different grades/types of flour to Asian noodles. Or some Asian noodles are made with rice but i'd call that a rice noodle. But mostly this aligns with me. Tagliatelle is just a shape of pasta. And yah, spaetzle is spaetzle though not something I think I've seen in a supermarket here (not that I've looked admittedly).

    All the recipes I have seen and the pasta making class I took it is: flour, salt, and egg. Only different one is gnocchi which also has mashed potato. Egg noodles usually have a little milk added to make them a bit fluffier than pasta

    The ? was rhetorical. I have made pasta at home (recommended, it's delicious but you have to 00 flour). I've never attempted noodles (my definition of noodles).

    Noodles should be light enough to roll out with a rolling pin. Pasta needs something more heavy duty (although you still get a good arm and upper body workout rolling out noodles)

    also: my apologies. I tend to not pick up on rhetorical questions. I tend to take them at face value

    No you're fine! I realised it could come off as an actual question. I'd like at some point to get a pasta machine. When I did it I did it with a rolling pin but it is hard work to get it silky smooth enough. Worth it though.

    When we were kids, we spent one memorable Saturday with my grandmother hand making pasta - no machine. We kneaded that dough FOREVER to get it smooth, and rolled it out on her mother's chitarra. It was a lot of work, and it was fun draping the pasta all over the place for it to dry out a bit, and felt like we had to wait forever to eat it!
  • NickleArse
    NickleArse Posts: 15 Member
    edited September 2017
    noel2fit wrote: »
    Protein is overrated.

    now that is an unpopular opinion
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    I have not tried groundhog. I was actually surprised recently to learn how many people I know well have eaten (mostly as children). I didn't know anyone ate it until a few years ago.

    I might try raccoon if I'd been drinking first. They pretty nasty critters. But so are hogs I suppose and I love me some pork.

    Hogs are excellent animals! Local pub here has its own pet pig, quite the celeb.
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,132 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    @piperdown44
    I should tell my co-workers that I'm entering the chili contest with a chili made of fruit and seeds and record their reactions.

    If it has beans it's not chili. It's stew.

    If it doesn't have beans it's not chili, it's hot dog or pasta sauce.

    Texas chili has no beans in it.

    Texans do it wrong.

    This is the unpopular opinions thread. I personally don't discriminate against any chili.

    Neither do I. I love hot dog chili too. ;)

    Me too, I put both kinds on my hot dogs. ;)

    Have you had Cincinnati style?

    Is that with cinnamon?

    Or nutmeg, depending on which restaurant you go to.
    It's not an overwhelming flavor. Just a hint.
    The key to good Cincy chili is the texture.

    Some guy at a local chili cookoff made Cincinnati chili with cinnamon once. No idea how authentic it was, but I thought it was pretty good. I can't say I remember the texture at all. It was several years ago. He didn't win.

    He wouldn't, I think. Most people seem to prefer eating things that taste the same way that particular dish has always tasted in their world.

    This is the whole basis of the regional chili wars.

    Cincinnati chili wouldn't win a chili cook-off in Cincinnati. It's not intended to be eaten as chili. It's just a tangy meat sauce for hot dogs and spaghetti.
  • Need2Exerc1se
    Need2Exerc1se Posts: 13,577 Member
    noel2fit wrote: »
    Protein is overrated.

    IDK if I'd agree to overrated, but I do think it's over pushed on MFP.
  • CSARdiver
    CSARdiver Posts: 6,257 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    All meat - all edible - all delicious (depending on preparation).

    My grandfather used to trap/hunt raccoon - skin and sell the pelts and use the meat in a stew. Repeated saltwater soaks and some tenderizing really helps.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    I would eat a woodchuck. I've never seen it as an option though. Where is this likely to be on the menu? Pacific Northwest?
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,132 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    Woodchuck is just a fat squirrel. I'd eat it.
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,132 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    I probably would, I've eaten other "exotic" meats so it would be foolish not to. I draw the line at rats, insects, eyeballs and testicles.

    I'm not sure raccoon and rats are all that different.

    Raccoons are not rodents.
  • Carlos_421
    Carlos_421 Posts: 5,132 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    I probably would, I've eaten other "exotic" meats so it would be foolish not to. I draw the line at rats, insects, eyeballs and testicles.

    you should give testicles a try! Rocky mountain oysters. mmmmm mmmm mmmm.

    As a man, I cannot condone this. Principles.
  • 3bambi3
    3bambi3 Posts: 1,650 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    I probably would, I've eaten other "exotic" meats so it would be foolish not to. I draw the line at rats, insects, eyeballs and testicles.

    you should give testicles a try! Rocky mountain oysters. mmmmm mmmm mmmm.

    As a man, I cannot condone this. Principles.

    I feel the same way about eggs, for the most part.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    I probably would, I've eaten other "exotic" meats so it would be foolish not to. I draw the line at rats, insects, eyeballs and testicles.

    you should give testicles a try! Rocky mountain oysters. mmmmm mmmm mmmm.

    As a man, I cannot condone this. Principles.

    real men consume the testicles of our prey
  • cmriverside
    cmriverside Posts: 32,614 Member
    Porcupine is supposed to be delicious. Seems like a woodchuck with pointy bits, doesn't it?

    ...and I'm in the PNW. Granted I don't go to many edgy restaurants but I've never seen woodchuck as a food choice here.
  • jdlobb
    jdlobb Posts: 1,232 Member
    I have no idea what region woodchucks are native to. They just seem like critters you'd find in Oregon or Washington
  • magster4isu
    magster4isu Posts: 612 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    I can understand why eating raccoon might sound disgusting, even to meat-eaters. But I don't really understand why a meat-eater wouldn't be open-minded about trying woodchuck/groundhog. They're mostly plant-eaters, and plant-eating animals usually taste OK. Has anyone eaten it?

    (I'd try woodchuck, if I weren't vegetarian. Vegetarian now, 43 years worth, but grew up in a subculture where hunting/fishing for food was common practice. I never ate woodchuck, but have had venison, wild rabbit, squirrel, etc.)

    I probably would, I've eaten other "exotic" meats so it would be foolish not to. I draw the line at rats, insects, eyeballs and testicles.

    So you won't be joining me for some Rocky Mountain Oyesters at the Testical Featival? (Yes, that is a real event)
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    jdlobb wrote: »
    I have no idea what region woodchucks are native to. They just seem like critters you'd find in Oregon or Washington

    They are definitely pests in Wisconsin.
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