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What are your unpopular opinions about health / fitness?

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Replies

  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    It's funny, I keep thinking of other noodle dishes I had as a kid now that this topic has percolated some. A favorite of mine that my mother used to make was Swedish meatballs with noodles.

    (This is no longer intended to be anything beyond sharing memories.)
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    My unpopular opinion is that jogging is awful, running is even worse, but sprinting is fun. Running is exhausting and not actually that fast and there's better methods of cardio to lose weight. At least with sprinting you're going really fast and being slightly exhausted at the end is kind of the point. Try to look up a sprinting program, though, and nothing.

    All those girls who tell me I can't lose weight without tons of running... ugh.

    Running being exhausting seems like an extremely subjective thing. I mean, yeah, it burns energy (like lots of activities), but if you're properly conditioned, you should be able to run for quite a while. And I can't really understand why being exhausted at the end of sprinting is acceptable because it's the point (why is it the point of sprinting only, why can't it also be part of some running workouts?).

    I don't think many people choose running because they think it's the fastest form of transportation.

    I don't run to lose weight. I run to run, I run because it's one of the funnest activities for me. I get it's not for everyone, but these objections seem really odd.

    Yeah, I run because I find it enjoyable and a great stress release. And occasionally because I can run home from my office in not that much more time than public transportation takes, so it's a great way to multitask two things I want to do (go home, work out).
  • Packerjohn
    Packerjohn Posts: 4,855 Member
    It's unpopular to say that you exercise for calories, many often feel the goal would be superior if it's done for fitness. I exercise for calories and I don't mind not being superior. Fitness and enjoyment are just pleasant side effects.

    Many would discourage eating when not hungry. I don't find anything wrong with that. If my calories are accounted for, you bet your boots I'm going to eat hedonically and enjoy every single bite without the least bit of guilt, and I don't consider it to be an unhealthy relationship with food. I think it's perfectly normal to eat for the sole purpose of enjoying food as long as it's not detrimental to the weight loss process as a whole.

    Many people would consider going very low on calories after a high calorie day to be detrimental and something that could fuel a binge and restrict mentality. I'm not afraid of these tactics because I've never had an eating disorder and it's all calculated, planned, and relatively anxiety-free. I do it as a "naturally thin people mimicking" strategy not as a punishment. The way you mentally approach such a practice makes all the difference.

    If a high protein diet is not sustainable I feel it's perfectly okay to eat as much protein as is reasonably manageable. I feel for some people "high protein" is the new "low carb" (which was the new "low fat"), that is, a rigid panic inducing requirement for weight loss with no middle ground. A person's goals don't need to be identical to everyone else's, so if slightly higher muscle loss (the difference is not even that large) is an acceptable tradeoff for someone, then so be it.

    I don't believe that crash dieting is always bad. I'm very careful when I voice this opinion and I don't voice it often because it may be mistaken for promoting crash dieting for everyone, but there are cases where I believe it could be okay.

    I don't think people "need" to lift any more than they "need" to run. It's perfectly okay to not enjoy lifting and you're not inferior if you don't.

    Yes, I like using the treadmill. Sue me.

    Thsnk you for the comment on lifting. Lots of lifters look down on those who dont lift. I do what i enjoy, lots of different things

    You do realize that resistance exercise is recommended by the CDC for sustained good health? It's not just the domain of some bros who want to flex in too tight t-shirts.

    https://www.cdc.gov/physicalactivity/basics/adults/index.htm
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,296 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    Not done. "What type of pasta?" "Penne". And even "What type of penne?" "Quinoa".

    ;):);)
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    The conversation tends to go more like "What's for dinner" "Tuna noodle casserole". End of conversation. The type of noodle would only come up when one is asking for the recipe. "What noodles do you use in your pasta salad?" "Tri-color shells"
  • GottaBurnEmAll
    GottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722 Member
    My unpopular opinion is that jogging is awful, running is even worse, but sprinting is fun. Running is exhausting and not actually that fast and there's better methods of cardio to lose weight. At least with sprinting you're going really fast and being slightly exhausted at the end is kind of the point. Try to look up a sprinting program, though, and nothing.

    All those girls who tell me I can't lose weight without tons of running... ugh.

    Yeah, that's going to be an unpopular opinion with runners.

    Running and jogging are the same thing, btw.

    The point of running isn't necessarily to be fast, some of us are in it for endurance. Furthermore, the point of any exercise isn't weight loss, it's conditioning, fitness, and for some of us stress relief and mental health.

    I run because I like it, you obviously sprint because you like it, but I think you have a skewed view of what you're getting out an exercise program if you see it only as a means of achieving weight loss.
  • estherdragonbat
    estherdragonbat Posts: 5,285 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    The conversation tends to go more like "What's for dinner" "Tuna noodle casserole". End of conversation. The type of noodle would only come up when one is asking for the recipe. "What noodles do you use in your pasta salad?" "Tri-color shells"

    Tuna noodle casserole. My head just exploded. Not only do you have the wrong use of noodle but also the wrong use of casserole.

    I WANT MY LANGUAGE BACK*





    *Says the Scot who has never spoken a word of Gaelic in her life and has in fact also appropriated English.

    Well, if you're interested in another language from the same branch of the tree... Duolingo offers Welsh. (And despite having no cultural connection with the language whatsoever, my love for Susan Cooper's Dark is Rising Sequence and Madeleine L'Engle's Time Quartet have intrigued me enough to try picking it up. Though, as you'd expect, comprehension and spoken fluency are two radically different things...)
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    edited September 2017
    earlnabby wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    The conversation tends to go more like "What's for dinner" "Tuna noodle casserole". End of conversation. The type of noodle would only come up when one is asking for the recipe. "What noodles do you use in your pasta salad?" "Tri-color shells"

    Tuna noodle casserole. My head just exploded. Not only do you have the wrong use of noodle but also the wrong use of casserole.

    I WANT MY LANGUAGE BACK*





    *Says the Scot who has never spoken a word of Gaelic in her life and has in fact also appropriated English.

    Well, if you're interested in another language from the same branch of the tree... Duolingo offers Welsh. (And despite having no cultural connection with the language whatsoever, my love for Susan Cooper's Dark is Rising Sequence and Madeleine L'Engle's Time Quartet have intrigued me enough to try picking it up. Though, as you'd expect, comprehension and spoken fluency are two radically different things...)

    Do you know why the British add so many extra vowels to their words? They stole them all from the Welsh.

    I just learned something new. The reason many Brits call GSD's "Alsatians" is because of the same anti German sentiment that caused the royals to change their name to "Windsor" around the time of WWI. (I was watching a documentary about Windsor Castle when this was mentioned)
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    The conversation tends to go more like "What's for dinner" "Tuna noodle casserole". End of conversation. The type of noodle would only come up when one is asking for the recipe. "What noodles do you use in your pasta salad?" "Tri-color shells"

    Tuna noodle casserole. My head just exploded. Not only do you have the wrong use of noodle but also the wrong use of casserole.

    I WANT MY LANGUAGE BACK*





    *Says the Scot who has never spoken a word of Gaelic in her life and has in fact also appropriated English.

    What do you call a "casserole"? Around here, it is a one dish meal where all the ingredients are mixed together and baked in a casserole dish.
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    earlnabby wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    The conversation tends to go more like "What's for dinner" "Tuna noodle casserole". End of conversation. The type of noodle would only come up when one is asking for the recipe. "What noodles do you use in your pasta salad?" "Tri-color shells"

    Tuna noodle casserole. My head just exploded. Not only do you have the wrong use of noodle but also the wrong use of casserole.

    I WANT MY LANGUAGE BACK*





    *Says the Scot who has never spoken a word of Gaelic in her life and has in fact also appropriated English.

    Well, if you're interested in another language from the same branch of the tree... Duolingo offers Welsh. (And despite having no cultural connection with the language whatsoever, my love for Susan Cooper's Dark is Rising Sequence and Madeleine L'Engle's Time Quartet have intrigued me enough to try picking it up. Though, as you'd expect, comprehension and spoken fluency are two radically different things...)

    LOL no. If I don't speak the language of my ancestors, nor retained any of my high school French, the chances of me taking on Welsh are less than none.
  • lemurcat12
    lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886 Member
    edited September 2017
    earlnabby wrote: »
    earlnabby wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    jdlobb wrote: »
    Texas Chili competitions, the only ones that matter, will disqualify you for putting beans in a stew and calling it chili.

    I really don't care what the yankees up in Ohio do with their stews.

    IT'S NOT STEW! Ground beef does not a stew make.
    earlnabby wrote: »
    We have a restaurant locally called "Real Chili" and you can get your chili either over noodles (macaroni, not spaghetti), potatoes, or neither. Greasy spoon and a great place to stop after bar time.

    Again, noodles are not pasta, noodles are Asian, pasta is Italian and chili shouldn't be served with either. I'll let the potatoes pass.

    This is all correct.

    My family's cuisine is Eastern-European. "Lukshen" (i.e. egg noodles) are a thing in soup and casseroles. I wouldn't really class them as Asian nor Italian.

    Yeah, I actually agree that central European noodles (and Eastern too) are a thing, they are the first I had, and I would agree that noodles is the generic and includes pasta. Clarified in a post on noodles specifically after the one you quoted. (Noodle casserole was a thing in '70s midwestern and western US cuisine too, but one I opted out of strenuously and am glad is less common too, although I found the cream of mushroom soup or canned tuna or ruining perfectly good leftover turkey the real crimes thereof.)

    I do agree with what I saw as the key points of VintageFeline's post (not all that seriously) re stew and chili with noodles.

    I'll give you the inclusion of Eatern European, I was making sweeping statements, as you do.

    The thing about noodles as a catch all is it's conversationally clunky. "What's for dinner?", "Noodles", What type of noodles?", "Pasta". We could have got there without the middle two sentences; "Dinner?", "Pasta". One and done.

    The conversation tends to go more like "What's for dinner" "Tuna noodle casserole". End of conversation. The type of noodle would only come up when one is asking for the recipe. "What noodles do you use in your pasta salad?" "Tri-color shells"

    Tuna noodle casserole. My head just exploded. Not only do you have the wrong use of noodle but also the wrong use of casserole.

    I WANT MY LANGUAGE BACK*

    *Says the Scot who has never spoken a word of Gaelic in her life and has in fact also appropriated English.

    What do you call a "casserole"? Around here, it is a one dish meal where all the ingredients are mixed together and baked in a casserole dish.

    Easier to explain that pasta in the oven is pasta bake. Casseroles are basically stews (but the British definition of stew) cooked in a casserole dish in the oven. Hence casserole. I think it might even be of French origin. We don't call everything plopped in a dish and put in the oven a casserole. I'm also sure I had this discussion about 100 pages back but let's face it, who knows what *kitten* is going on anymore in this thread!

    Wiki is possibly helpful here. It says:
    A casserole (French: diminutive of casse, from Provençal cassa "pan"[1]) is a large, deep dish used both in the oven and as a serving vessel. The word is also used for the food cooked and served in such a vessel, with the cookware itself called a casserole dish or casserole pan.

    In the United States and continental Europe casseroles usually consist of pieces of meat (such as chicken) or fish (such as tuna), various chopped vegetables, a starchy binder such as flour, rice, potato or pasta, and often a crunchy or cheesy topping.[2] Liquids are released from the meat and vegetables during cooking, and further liquid in the form of stock, wine, beer (for example lapin à la Gueuze), gin, cider, or vegetable juice may be added when the dish is assembled. Casseroles are usually cooked slowly in the oven, often uncovered. They may be served as a main course or a side dish, and may be served in the vessel in which they were cooked.

    In the United Kingdom, Australia, and New Zealand, a casserole is named after its dish, rather than its contents. Casseroles in these countries are very similar to stews. The difference is that once the meat and vegetables are browned on top of the stove, they are then cooked in liquid in the oven in a closed dish, producing meat that is tender and juicy, from long slow cooking. The heat is indirect, so there is less chance of burning.

    Examples of casserole include ragout, Lancashire hotpot, cassoulet, tajine, moussaka, shepherd's pie, gratin, rice or macaroni timballo, and carbonnade. A distinction can be made between casseroles and stews: stewing is a cooking process whereby heat is applied to the bottom of the cooking vessel (typically over a fire or on a stove), whereas casserole is generally baked in an oven, where heat circulates all around the cooking vessel. Casseroles may be cooked covered or uncovered, while braises are typically covered to prevent evaporation.

    I would question tagine if the dish is named after the dish, however, because obviously a casserole dish and a tagine are different.

    I'd normally cook a stew on the stove (although it can be put in the oven too) and -- key difference -- in a covered pot, which is much deeper than a casserole dish. I'd also normally cook a stew for a longer time on lower temperatures and a casserole more like an hour at 375 or 400.

    I HATED most casseroles as a kid since in 1970s America they were a repository for leftovers, cream of mushroom soup (which is evil) and canned tuna (which I know this is an unpopular opinion, but I find disgusting and one of the only fish-based foods I dislike). Also, I didn't like food to touch each other much as a kid. However I loved my mom's lasagna and I learned at some point (probably for "make a recipe from another culture and bring it in" project in school) to do moussaka, which I also love).
  • DiamondCookies
    DiamondCookies Posts: 93 Member
    My unpopular opinion is that jogging is awful, running is even worse, but sprinting is fun. Running is exhausting and not actually that fast and there's better methods of cardio to lose weight. At least with sprinting you're going really fast and being slightly exhausted at the end is kind of the point. Try to look up a sprinting program, though, and nothing.

    All those girls who tell me I can't lose weight without tons of running... ugh.

    Running being exhausting seems like an extremely subjective thing. I mean, yeah, it burns energy (like lots of activities), but if you're properly conditioned, you should be able to run for quite a while. And I can't really understand why being exhausted at the end of sprinting is acceptable because it's the point (why is it the point of sprinting only, why can't it also be part of some running workouts?).

    I don't think many people choose running because they think it's the fastest form of transportation.

    I don't run to lose weight. I run to run, I run because it's one of the funnest activities for me. I get it's not for everyone, but these objections seem really odd.

    Honestly, my argument wasn't super thought out because I was more frustrated with my own lack of ability with jogging/running, and I had dealt with a bunch of people teasing me about it at my college gym.
  • earlnabby
    earlnabby Posts: 8,177 Member
    My unpopular opinion: spending extra money for sea salt is silly, unless you are going for a specific texture (ie:Malden flake) or flavor (ie: Hawaiian Black).
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 26,296 Member
    lemurcat12 wrote: »
    (. . . a bunch of interesting stuff, over 2 posts, about etymology, Shakespeare, and more . . .)

    Pedant mode today? I love it! (Seriously)

    During some of the "Is too" "Is not" sections, I've started hoping this thread would finally die, already. But if you're gonna start classing up the joint, not so much. ;)
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