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Of refeeds and diet breaks

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  • PAV8888PAV8888 Posts: 6,023Member Member Posts: 6,023Member Member
    I need to look up your recipe again! It failed to volumize the one time I tried it!!!
  • alteredsteve175alteredsteve175 Posts: 1,742Member Member Posts: 1,742Member Member
    anubis609 wrote: »
    anubis609 wrote: »
    So bloat happens, especially when you look for protein fluff recipes specifically designed to make you feel like you choked down 120g of birthday cake flavored protein cement.

    I laughed out loud at that - you make it sound so appetizing! HAHA! :D

    Trust me, it is mouth wateringly appetizing when you read it. It quickly begins to lose its appeal once you start making it and the guar gum or xantham gum start holding onto the fork/spoon/bowl and that's what's going to be sticking to your insides like spackle. Textural eaters will love the feeling of glue!

    I have made protein fluff (or ice cream) with and without the xanthan gum. I prefer it sans gum - the xanthan gives it a slick mouthfeel that I don't care for. I don't get as much volume, but no matter - there's plenty of volume with all the ice, and it's just a protein delivery vehicle, anyway.

  • anubis609anubis609 Posts: 3,981Member Member Posts: 3,981Member Member
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    I need to look up your recipe again! It failed to volumize the one time I tried it!!!

    There are so many variants of protein fluff, but the basic recipe is to get low fat+low calorie foods and combine with your choice of protein powder and any other high protein binding agent like egg whites. Alternatively, there is a thing known as protein sludge, which is essentially the same thing. Whatever gets you to choke down as much flavored protein that can be considered dessert as @alteredsteve175 mentioned.

    My basic recipe was non fat greek yogurt, some berries, 1-2 scoops of whey protein, and pb2 to make a sort of pb&j concoction. The yogurt was so damn thick I also didn't need the gum, and having 8 oz of it felt like a meal in itself, which it often was.
  • MaxxittMaxxitt Posts: 1,097Member Member Posts: 1,097Member Member
    anubis609 wrote: »
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    I need to look up your recipe again! It failed to volumize the one time I tried it!!!
    My basic recipe was non fat greek yogurt, some berries, 1-2 scoops of whey protein, and pb2 to make a sort of pb&j concoction. The yogurt was so damn thick I also didn't need the gum, and having 8 oz of it felt like a meal in itself, which it often was.

    Exactly what I did, only I put cocoa powder in place of the PB2.

  • geiznekcmgeiznekcm Posts: 1,358Member Member Posts: 1,358Member Member
    I'm sorry -- I am sure you all answered this already, but, if you don't mind reminding me, what appliance or method do you use to "volumize" your "protein fluff"?

    Thank you for being so generous to share your ideas and advice.

    Happy Saturday (:
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Posts: 6,023Member Member Posts: 6,023Member Member
    Hey, all the above sound like my normal greek yogurt "parfait" (except no extra protein but yes cereal, usually high fibre). But that does not volumize!!! So how does the fluff... fluff?!?!?
  • anubis609anubis609 Posts: 3,981Member Member Posts: 3,981Member Member
    geiznekcm wrote: »
    I'm sorry -- I am sure you all answered this already, but, if you don't mind reminding me, what appliance or method do you use to "volumize" your "protein fluff"?

    Thank you for being so generous to share your ideas and advice.

    Happy Saturday (:
    PAV8888 wrote: »
    Hey, all the above sound like my normal greek yogurt "parfait" (except no extra protein but yes cereal, usually high fibre). But that does not volumize!!! So how does the fluff... fluff?!?!?

    Aeration is usually what makes most viscous liquid "fluff."

    I found one that might help:
    https://www.bodybuilding.com/content/protein-fluff-3-quick-and-easy-recipes.html
  • alteredsteve175alteredsteve175 Posts: 1,742Member Member Posts: 1,742Member Member
    anubis609 wrote: »
    Aeration is usually what makes most viscous liquid "fluff."

    I found one that might help:
    https://www.bodybuilding.com/content/protein-fluff-3-quick-and-easy-recipes.html

    Thanks for sharing those recipes, @anubis609. My blender struggles to crush and then blend a whole tray of ice cubes, so this could be a good alternative. Could use a little fruit in the diet, so that's another plus.

  • OrphiaOrphia Posts: 6,940Member Member Posts: 6,940Member Member
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s42255-019-0095-y

    "Leptin and the endocrine control of energy balance." - Jeffrey M. Friedman, Nature, August 29, 2019.

    (pdf download available.)


    https://www.rockefeller.edu/news/26554-jeffrey-m-friedman-to-receive-2020-breakthrough-prize-in-life-sciences/

    "Jeffrey M. Friedman, whose [1994] discovery of the hormone leptin has transformed our understanding of obesity, will be a 2020 recipient of the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences. He is being honored for his discovery of a new endocrine system through which adipose tissue signals the brain to regulate food intake. Friedman is the Marilyn M. Simpson Professor and head of the Laboratory of Molecular Genetics at Rockefeller, as well as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator.

    "The relatively new Breakthrough Prize, with its accompanying $3 million award, is the most generous prize in the sciences, and recognizes achievements in the life sciences, fundamental physics, and mathematics. The prize was established eight years ago by several Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs, including the founders of Google, Facebook, and 23andMe.

    "Friedman’s 1994 discovery of leptin, and of its receptor in the brain encoded by the obese gene, shed new light on the pathogenesis of obesity. He and his colleagues have since shown that leptin acts on sets of neurons in brain centers that regulate food intake and energy expenditure, and has powerful effects on reproduction, metabolism, other endocrine systems, and immune function."
  • MelodiousMermaidMelodiousMermaid Posts: 161Member Member Posts: 161Member Member
    I'm not sure how much I can talk/ask about this on MFP due to the nature of the beast, but I'm getting into LM's RFL and find myself wanting to ask questions/read others' experiences. Is there a good place for that on the internet that you guys know of? Figured this was as good a place as any to start since LM has been part of the discussion.
    edited September 21
  • middlehaitchmiddlehaitch Posts: 8,169Member Member Posts: 8,169Member Member
    I'm not sure how much I can talk/ask about this on MFP due to the nature of the beast, but I'm getting into LM's RFL and find myself wanting to ask questions/read others' experiences. Is there a good place for that on the internet that you guys know of? Figured this was as good a place as any since LM has been part of the discussion.

    RFL, etc can be discussed on the ‘gaining weight and body building’ subforum.

    Post any questions there.

    Cheers, h.
  • psuLemonpsuLemon Posts: 35,365Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator Posts: 35,365Member, MFP Moderator, Greeter, Premium MFP Moderator
    I'm not sure how much I can talk/ask about this on MFP due to the nature of the beast, but I'm getting into LM's RFL and find myself wanting to ask questions/read others' experiences. Is there a good place for that on the internet that you guys know of? Figured this was as good a place as any since LM has been part of the discussion.

    RFL, etc can be discussed on the ‘gaining weight and body building’ subforum.

    Post any questions there.

    Cheers, h.

    Yep. And a few of us have ran the program.
  • OrphiaOrphia Posts: 6,940Member Member Posts: 6,940Member Member
    I'm going to post this link since I can't find it in here, and it's fantastic and sums up a lot that's said in this thread.

    Leptin, ghrelin, and weight loss.
    Here's what the research has to say.
    By Helen Kollias, Ph.D.

    https://www.precisionnutrition.com/leptin-ghrelin-weight-loss

    Not sure about their coaching program, but I've been reading quite a few articles from there, and they're balanced articles, not absolutist or extremist, and very science-based.
  • OrphiaOrphia Posts: 6,940Member Member Posts: 6,940Member Member
    Been learning bits about evolutionary psychology.

    As well as leptin and ghrelin, other hormones seem to affect hunger. e.g. women need more energy intake during certain times in a cycle. (re Lyle McDonald.)
    PMS is worse if you're not eating enough.

    Running and exercise help with stress and burning off our fight/flight instincts when most of us have desk or indoor jobs that can be very stressful. But too much intense exercise increases stress (adrenaline and cortisol).

    I've suspected for a while that testosterone compels men to continually compete and overdo it when they exercise. It's certainly pretty bad for women comparing ourselves to others in the gene pool. And social media and technology's effects on top causing us to want to look more awesome than the next person.

    I have more I could say about this all leading to injuries, and unsustainability in fitness.

    Dopamine and serotonin can also be nice happy comfortable influencers that make competitiveness less important and make us want to be happy just being with our tribe around our campfire safe from wild animals.

    I guess these hormones can also be part of the reason people want to stick to a diet their peers prefer.
    edited September 22
  • anubis609anubis609 Posts: 3,981Member Member Posts: 3,981Member Member
    Dopamine and serotonin being a couple of the reward neurotransmitters that get signaled during exercise, positive experiences, excitement, food, drugs, sex, etc. are all part of why people do what they do, which may or may not be progressive to a body composition goal.

    Some people react to each of those stimuli differently, so while reward signaling is a good thing, it's also very helpful to guide people to find enjoyment in healthful acts to continue it long term.
  • OrphiaOrphia Posts: 6,940Member Member Posts: 6,940Member Member
    I see Metabolomics hasn't been mentioned.

    I started learning about it a year ago, and have gone off on many tangents, coming back to this thread and always forgetting to mention it because reasons. :smile:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metabolomics

    "Metabolomics is the scientific study of chemical processes involving metabolites, the small molecule substrates, intermediates and products of metabolism. Specifically, metabolomics is the "systematic study of the unique chemical fingerprints that specific cellular processes leave behind", the study of their small-molecule metabolite profiles.[1] The metabolome represents the complete set of metabolites in a biological cell, tissue, organ or organism, which are the end products of cellular processes.[2] mRNA gene expression data and proteomic analyses reveal the set of gene products being produced in the cell, data that represents one aspect of cellular function. Conversely, metabolic profiling can give an instantaneous snapshot of the physiology of that cell, and thus, metabolomics provides a direct "functional readout of the physiological state" of an organism.[3] One of the challenges of systems biology and functional genomics is to integrate genomics, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic information to provide a better understanding of cellular biology."

    Today's "reasons" are to do with how individual hormones can be studied and how there are infinite ways the hormones relate to our body's biological/chemical makeup which changes moment by moment.


    We can detect certain "imbalances" (I hate that word but people might relate) that language or categorisation of an influential concept helps us to process in a way that means we can make an alteration to our purposeful behaviour.


    One thing I know I am on the fringes about is the effect of language on our behaviour.


    A few more random observations:


    Meat seems to relate to people's self-perceived relationship or power.

    Bingeing can be the only cardio workout some people get. (The rush of shopping; eating; then the guilt.)

    Likewise, computer gaming.

    Or getting angry on social media.

    Or smoking, and the worry that goes with it.

    People can be paralysed by the fear of change.


    Again, these are random thoughts that (at least in my mind) are to do with body chemistry and weight.
  • anubis609anubis609 Posts: 3,981Member Member Posts: 3,981Member Member
    Diving deep down into the cellular and molecular changes, while a genuine result of cascading effects, are going to be less of a concern to the average person since they're imperceptible outside of a lab. Though, it does lead to a good point you're implying, that stress management is important. I'd rather people recognize stressors and make adjustments to how they cope with them. Cellular changes will take place in either direction, whether stress management was positively or negatively effective.
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