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Vitamin A toxicity?

carynfuldacarynfulda Posts: 5Member, Premium Member Posts: 5Member, Premium Member
I decided to change the settings to see how much Vitamin A and Vitamin C I'm getting. Because it's only displayed in percentages (I just paid a premium subscription for one month hoping I could change it) I don't know how much, only that I'm getting too much Vitamin A. Just one serving of a green, leafy vegetable is more than 100% of what I need according to MFP. Any ideas on how I could figure out how they calculate this before I give up vegetables? I mean, 150% of a vitamin that can easily cause liver toxicity issues is kind of scary, but if they actually calculate it on the low end, I might be okay.
edited May 15

Replies

  • Reed039Reed039 Posts: 62Member Member Posts: 62Member Member
    There are multiple types of vitamin A. With plant-based vitamin A, it's unlikely to overdose. Vitamin A toxicity is only really a concern with animal sources of vitamin A.
  • CyberToneCyberTone Posts: 7,509Member Member Posts: 7,509Member Member
    Here is a link to an information fact sheet from the US National Institutes of Health. Most people who eat a balanced, nutritious diet should have no issues with Vitamin A toxicity.

    https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminA-HealthProfessional/

    --- --- ---

    On current nutrition labels, 100% DRI for Vitamin A corresponds to 900 mcg. Vitamin A will be dropped as a required nutrient to be listed on US Nutrition Facts labels by 2021 (unless the FDA postpones the updated labels yet again).

    Reference:

    https://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/LabelingNutrition/ucm385663.htm

    --- --- ---

    The Daily Reference Intakes are set by the US FDA guidelines and are based on a 2000 daily caloric diet for the average person. Not all micronutrients are required to be reported on US Nutrition Facts labels; but if they are reported, these are the daily RDIs the percentages per serving are to be based on.

    Nutrient, Unit of measure, RDI (Adults and children = 4 years +)

    Vitamin A Micrograms RAE 2 (mcg) 900
    Vitamin C Milligrams (mg) 90
    Calcium Milligrams (mg) 1,300
    Iron Milligrams (mg) 18
    Vitamin D Micrograms (mcg) 3
    Vitamin E Milligrams (mg) 4
    Vitamin K Micrograms (mcg) 120
    Thiamin Milligrams (mg) 1.2
    Riboflavin Milligrams (mg) 1.3
    Niacin Milligrams NE 5 (mg) 16
    Vitamin B6 Milligrams (mg) 1.7
    Folate 6 Micrograms DFE 7 (mcg) 400
    Vitamin B12 Micrograms (mcg) 2.4
    Biotin Micrograms (mcg) 30
    Pantothenic acid Milligrams (mg) 5
    Phosphorus Milligrams (mg) 1,250
    Iodine Micrograms (mcg) 150
    Magnesium Milligrams (mg) 420
    Zinc Milligrams (mg) 11
    Selenium Micrograms (mcg) 55
    Copper Milligrams (mg) 0.9
    Manganese Milligrams (mg) 2.3
    Chromium Micrograms (mcg) 35
    Molybdenum Micrograms (mcg) 45
    Chloride Milligrams (mg) 2,300
    Potassium Milligrams (mg) 4,700
    Choline Milligrams (mg) 550
    Protein Grams (g) N/A

    Reference:

    https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=101.9
  • carynfuldacarynfulda Posts: 5Member, Premium Member Posts: 5Member, Premium Member
    Thanks. I had read up about it and what caught my attention was that there is very broad range regarding the recommended daily intake depending on the resource. According to MFP I'm consuming 1512 mcg a day, but that's assuming they are using the FDA guidelines. I can't find anything on MFP that shows what their values are based on, which was my initial post.
    edited May 16
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Posts: 30,886Member Member Posts: 30,886Member Member
    Reed039 wrote: »
    There are multiple types of vitamin A. With plant-based vitamin A, it's unlikely to overdose. Vitamin A toxicity is only really a concern with animal sources of vitamin A.

    This, plus supplements of course.

    Plant vitamin A (carotenoids) need to be converted by your body to retinoids which is what you can OD on, and your body won't convert too much, so it's just not an issue. On the other hand, avoid polar bear liver.
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