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BMI - agree or disagree?

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  • bostonjim23bostonjim23 Posts: 41Member Member Posts: 41Member Member
    Yes an no it depends on muscle mass an how large your bone structure is.

    It is the same for a resting pulse some one who has a 40bpm for resting that is not athletic is not health though if your an athlete that it is healthy.
    edited July 29
  • 2bfitchick2bfitchick Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    I had to look up the information in American Council on Exercise Personal Trainer Manual.
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,579Member Member Posts: 2,579Member Member
    I think it can be useful, but for a certain percentage of the population it's not completely relevant. This can include those with rather large or small bone structures.
    I've hovered right around the underweight cutoff before. There's a big difference IMO between being small framed with some noticeable muscle mass at that BMI (which I was) vs a medium frame and at that weight from medical conditions. That's certainly not to say that a BMI around that level is ideal for any given male, though, or that it necessarily was for me.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 4,117Member Member Posts: 4,117Member Member
    I agree it is a good guide for most people - allowing for outliers.

    But most people and their doctors know darn well whether they are an elite body builder or a person with dwarfism or an amputee or any other sort of outlier for whom the regular range would not be applicable

    The range of healthy also needs to be adjusted for types of regular people.
    many sporty young men, for example - not elite body builders, just regular sporty men - will be healthy at a BMI slightly above the regular cut off point - ie up to about 27 instead of 25
    Also, if I remember rightly, asian people are generally best at a slightly lower cut off point - something like 23.5 instead of 25

    None of this makes BMI bad or useless - just means it needs to be used as a guide in individual context.

    Like most things.
  • SweatLikeDogSweatLikeDog Posts: 271Member Member Posts: 271Member Member
    Back from something better to do. Do you really think Arnold DIDN'T juice? BMI doesn't track fatness, it tracks weight. Period. It goes down whether you lose muscle or fat and it goes up whether you gain muscle or fat.
  • zdyb23456zdyb23456 Posts: 1,638Member Member Posts: 1,638Member Member
    I agree it is a good guide for most people - allowing for outliers.


    Also, if I remember rightly, asian people are generally best at a slightly lower cut off point - something like 23.5 instead of 25

    None of this makes BMI bad or useless - just means it needs to be used as a guide in individual context.

    Like most things.

    Oh man, this means I’m 2 pounds away from being overweight 😬

    My husband has a BMI of 24.8, only a few pounds from being overweight too. At 12% body fat he certainly doesn’t look it. I on the other hand do. So he may be more of an outlier, but it works for me.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 4,117Member Member Posts: 4,117Member Member
    zdyb23456 wrote: »
    I agree it is a good guide for most people - allowing for outliers.


    Also, if I remember rightly, asian people are generally best at a slightly lower cut off point - something like 23.5 instead of 25

    None of this makes BMI bad or useless - just means it needs to be used as a guide in individual context.

    Like most things.

    Oh man, this means I’m 2 pounds away from being overweight 😬

    My husband has a BMI of 24.8, only a few pounds from being overweight too. At 12% body fat he certainly doesn’t look it. I on the other hand do. So he may be more of an outlier, but it works for me.

    It is a guide and a range though not an exact cut off.

    Most young men probably are healthy at BMI of 24.8 especially with known low body fat percentages - that doesn't make him an outlier, just means he fits in at upper end of range.

  • istillmissscotlandistillmissscotland Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
    I do not think that BMI is a universally applicable tool - it's generalized and nonspecific. It has not been useful for myself or anyone in my family. If it is helpful for others, there lies that validity. The biggest mistake I find with BMI is it's incorporation into school children's fitness assessment across the board. An 8 year old, 12 year old, or 16 year old (particularly girls) should never be labeled by a BMI. It is extremely intrusive, presumptuous, misapplied and it's worst effect is in the self concept of the individual young person. It shouldnt be used unless requested by a parent or physician - never by a school PE teacher or nurse and then shared with the student. The use of BMI competition and comparison in eating disordered young women is rampant.
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