Garden thread

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  • SuzanneC1l9zz
    SuzanneC1l9zz Posts: 447 Member
    I finally have the supplies I need to corral the raspberries properly, so that's on my to-do list for today. Part of the point is to keep the dogs out as well - they bite off the canes a few inches above the ground and play keepaway with them 😑 Up to now I've had a pallet propped up, braced between the fence and the corner of the house, with a decorative box that'll have flowers in it eventually in front of it to prevent the dogs pushing it over, but through there is also the only access to the hose tap so I've had to move the whole setup every day to water the garden. I can't wait to have something more practical!
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    Last one today, I promise!

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  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    And by last one, I meant picture of the spaghetti squash plant!

    Variety is the spice of life, right!?! This is what my free gift of seeds should look like if I grow them correctly. I'll pot a few this week and see what happens. I'm enjoying this because it's kind of a fun and hopeful experiment.

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  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,287 Member
    Pot full of tiny emergent baby basil plants. There are similar pots of cilantro (coriander) and dill, but those babies have kind of boring straight thread-y cotyledons like most seedlings, not the cute spade-shaped ones that basil seeds have.
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  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    One week since I potted the seed, wow...!!!

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  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,724 Member
    In trying to beat the slugs to my strawberries, I went to the local hardware store to buy Sluggo, as suggested on MFP, yesterday. All out due to supply chains. :/ One guy showed me Seven and I asked if it was organic...oh no, lots of poisons in that stuff. :( Tell me why they still sell *kitten* like that. :( Anyways, they also suggested the beer thing, along with cutting an orange or grapefruit in half and placing it cut side down, then next morning it'll be covered in slugs and you can just throw it away. JIC someone needed another 'kill the slugs' idea. :)
  • Fuzzipeg
    Fuzzipeg Posts: 2,297 Member
    I had to stop the slug traps because I caught a newt or two one year. Newts like to eat slugs and other creepy crawlies. My sister has a mole in her garden which also eats slugs and things too.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    @ReenieHJ Sadly, I agree with you. I use "environmentally friendly" products to wash my dishes, clothes, and most parts of my house and I certainly would not knowingly use chemicals in my garden. I bought the last Seventh Generation dishwasher detergent off the shelf at my work yesterday but it's been sitting there forever. It all works the same to me but I sleep a little better at night if I think I haven't worsened the issue, intentionally.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    This has been fun, yet, I have no idea what I'm doing. Not really...

    Matador Spinach is in the back and it's a cool weather plant that I know won't tolerate Texas 100+ summer days so I'm just going to watch it and see what I can get. It will stay indoors 90% of the day. I still have several seeds left for the fall/winter, which is when I plan to get super crazy with it.

    In this picture, there's three Globe Onions, three spaghetti squash, one zucchini, one Bell Pepper, lavender and sadly the one jalapeno pepper plant that I had, which had its leaves pecked by the bird, got slightly snapped in the wind yesterday. I have a terrible habit of ripping things out of the dirt if I don't like them, but I'm going to see if it doesn't mend itself... hopefully...

    Only seeds I bought that have not germinated are some red Spanish onions and I'm losing hope on those ones or maybe they just take a little longer.

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  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 12,400 Member
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    In trying to beat the slugs to my strawberries, I went to the local hardware store to buy Sluggo, as suggested on MFP, yesterday. All out due to supply chains. :/ One guy showed me Seven and I asked if it was organic...oh no, lots of poisons in that stuff. :( Tell me why they still sell *kitten* like that. :( Anyways, they also suggested the beer thing, along with cutting an orange or grapefruit in half and placing it cut side down, then next morning it'll be covered in slugs and you can just throw it away. JIC someone needed another 'kill the slugs' idea. :)

    Sluggo is good stuff. Iron phosphate. Non-toxic. Slugs do eat it and then that's their end. I use it. I also use home-made bait traps. I used to use beer. Works OK. Most slugs drown, but some find their way out and stumble home. I now add a little flour to make a very thin paste. They don't get out.

    Lately, instead of beer, I just proof a little baking yeast with some warm water and sugar (just a little), then make a VERY thin dough/batter with just flour and water. I pour this into some containers and put that out. It's the smell of fermentation that attracts them. Some cheap beer doesn't smell enough like fermentation to attract them as well.

    I also leave out snake habitat. Garter snakes eat slugs. Sadly, that also can be slug habitat.

    I have definitely struggled with slugs in the past. This year they really pissed me off. I have some oak logs that are inoculated with shiitake. One of them had just barely started to fruit. You couldn't even identify the little growth as a mushroom, but it was. Well, the next morning there was just some dried slug slime on the log and no mushrooms. So now that they started this war, I will go win it.

    The flour/water/yeast solution is probably cheaper than Sluggo. There are other brands of slug baits that use iron phosphate. They should be just as good as Sluggo. Look for those. Definitely avoid the other slug killers that are made with metaldehyde. That stuff does work, but it's poisonous to people and animals.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    edited June 2022
    Thai, Genovese, cinnamon, sweet, and lemon are different types of basil, interesting. I just want the kind that goes in spaghetti sauce...Genovese?

    Add purple basil.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    Matador Spinach seedlings mm2nqwmiodoc.jpg
  • MsCzar
    MsCzar Posts: 1,038 Member
    Had the first home grown salad of the year! Swiss chard, lettuce and beet greens with store bought carrots, onion, daikon, broccoli and hard boiled egg.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    What do y'all think of this for three spaghetti squash plants? Any thoughts, opinions, and suggestions are welcomed. Thank you!
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  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,287 Member
    LoveyChar wrote: »
    What do y'all think of this for three spaghetti squash plants? Any thoughts, opinions, and suggestions are welcomed. Thank you!
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    There's a bit of variety-specific variation to this: The seed company I've most often used has long-vine, short-vine, semi-bush varieties of spaghetti squash. (Other companies seem to be introducing bush types, too, intended for smaller-pot culture. Tivoli is an example, reportedly about 3 feet wide.)

    If you have trouble with squash vine borers, and plant long-vine squash, you'd probably want a bigger area (so you can encourage the vines to send down roots from nodes, not just the plant base). The longer vine types are more likely to want more total soil, too, IMO, with semi-bush or bush types maybe willing to do well in a smaller pot.

    The one you posted looks pretty big, seems like it'd be OK for bush, semi-bush, maybe short-vine. I'm a little more skeptical about long-vine, especially if there are squash vine borers. Guessing, though.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    @AnnPT77 Thank you. I have no idea what they are. I ordered seeds off of Etsy, company called Back To Nature and all I know is that they're organic spaghetti squash seeds. I appreciate your input. I'm going to see if I can find out more, whether bush or vine...
  • mtaratoot
    mtaratoot Posts: 12,400 Member
    @LoveyChar

    I really prefer to grow in soil... in the ground. I've never been a big fan of planters, although as I ran out of space last year I put one tomato in a big plastic pot as an experiment. I am fortunate to have good soil. It still benefits from amendments. You can build good soil over time. That would be my focus, and it is.

    I do grow some ornamental perennial plants in pots.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 31,287 Member
    LoveyChar wrote: »
    @AnnPT77 Thank you. I have no idea what they are. I ordered seeds off of Etsy, company called Back To Nature and all I know is that they're organic spaghetti squash seeds. I appreciate your input. I'm going to see if I can find out more, whether bush or vine...

    Purely a wild guess, but if they don't say on the web site or the packet, long-vine seems more probable, especially if it's advertised as an heirloom variety. IME it's more common for old-school varieties of squash, cucumber, and similar vining things to be long-vine, with the more compact hybrid varieties something that has become more popular in the more recent decades, with smaller home gardens and the popularity of growing veggies in pots.

    When someone has a large garden space, as would've been more common in subsistence-farming days, the long vine types have some advantages, such as being more prolific (generally), but they do take up a lot of space.
  • LoveyChar
    LoveyChar Posts: 4,333 Member
    mtaratoot wrote: »
    @LoveyChar

    I really prefer to grow in soil... in the ground. I've never been a big fan of planters, although as I ran out of space last year I put one tomato in a big plastic pot as an experiment. I am fortunate to have good soil. It still benefits from amendments. You can build good soil over time. That would be my focus, and it is.

    I do grow some ornamental perennial plants in pots.

    Thank you for the input. I have no idea what my soil is like. I have a raised garden bed and everything else is in pots. We've got room for a small garden and now I'm thinking about it, just seems better the more I think about it.