Calorie Counter

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  • TacklewasherTacklewasher Posts: 6,666Member Member Posts: 6,666Member Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Are the assumptions and formulas used to calculate CI and CO going to be 100% exact for everyone...well, no....but nothing is and it doesn't have to be to be extremely useful. Chances are (and I mean that in the literal stats sense) that of someone calorie tracking and it doesn't match their weight change it will be more likely to be inaccurate tracking than 3-sigma special snowflake status.

    Was thinking about this and I think I thought of a good example of something else that is accepted as "good enough" to clarify.

    My speedometer is off by 2%. So when I'm going 100kmh, my truck says 102. I've tested this against a GPS. GM (my truck brand) calibrates their speedos to a standard tire size, but it might not be the exact size they put on. And tire size varies from brand to brand. VW (from what I understand) can be as much as 5% off. Probably to help fake MPG numbers. But all in all, it's good enough and you don't really need to care unless you seriously go from stock size (like offroaders will do). Cops and the courts understand this and don't target the exact speed limit, but allow wiggle room. Some more than others, but always enough to cover the difference. It also means if you are diligently driving the speed limit, as per your speedo, you may be passed by someone doing the same thing with.

    The calorie estimates are "good enough". If your experience is dramatically different, then you are likely making a mistake. Yeah, there are people with absorption issues (and guys running 44 inch tires), but in general you either know about them or need to see a doctor. Barring a serious medical issue, you are going to be good enough with the models.

    What's the likelihood the expected error on my car is 20%? I feel like this could be compelling next time I'm doing 120 in a 100 zone.

    Have you got 44 inch tires on it?

    I've seen guys who are off that much. Most get it fixed at the tranny/transfer case with aftermarket products or software patches.
  • TacklewasherTacklewasher Posts: 6,666Member Member Posts: 6,666Member Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Math. Urgh

    That's why you go with big round numbers. Much easier to calculate 20% of 100.

    Yeah, well I'm an accountant so I use my high school algebra most days. :)
  • TacklewasherTacklewasher Posts: 6,666Member Member Posts: 6,666Member Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Are the assumptions and formulas used to calculate CI and CO going to be 100% exact for everyone...well, no....but nothing is and it doesn't have to be to be extremely useful. Chances are (and I mean that in the literal stats sense) that of someone calorie tracking and it doesn't match their weight change it will be more likely to be inaccurate tracking than 3-sigma special snowflake status.

    Was thinking about this and I think I thought of a good example of something else that is accepted as "good enough" to clarify.

    My speedometer is off by 2%. So when I'm going 100kmh, my truck says 102. I've tested this against a GPS. GM (my truck brand) calibrates their speedos to a standard tire size, but it might not be the exact size they put on. And tire size varies from brand to brand. VW (from what I understand) can be as much as 5% off. Probably to help fake MPG numbers. But all in all, it's good enough and you don't really need to care unless you seriously go from stock size (like offroaders will do). Cops and the courts understand this and don't target the exact speed limit, but allow wiggle room. Some more than others, but always enough to cover the difference. It also means if you are diligently driving the speed limit, as per your speedo, you may be passed by someone doing the same thing with.

    The calorie estimates are "good enough". If your experience is dramatically different, then you are likely making a mistake. Yeah, there are people with absorption issues (and guys running 44 inch tires), but in general you either know about them or need to see a doctor. Barring a serious medical issue, you are going to be good enough with the models.

    What's the likelihood the expected error on my car is 20%? I feel like this could be compelling next time I'm doing 120 in a 100 zone.

    Have you got 44 inch tires on it?

    I've seen guys who are off that much. Most get it fixed at the tranny/transfer case with aftermarket products or software patches.

    44 inch tires on my car would look a lot like this:

    maxresdefault.jpg

    And????
  • nutmegoreonutmegoreo Posts: 13,236Member Member Posts: 13,236Member Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Are the assumptions and formulas used to calculate CI and CO going to be 100% exact for everyone...well, no....but nothing is and it doesn't have to be to be extremely useful. Chances are (and I mean that in the literal stats sense) that of someone calorie tracking and it doesn't match their weight change it will be more likely to be inaccurate tracking than 3-sigma special snowflake status.

    Was thinking about this and I think I thought of a good example of something else that is accepted as "good enough" to clarify.

    My speedometer is off by 2%. So when I'm going 100kmh, my truck says 102. I've tested this against a GPS. GM (my truck brand) calibrates their speedos to a standard tire size, but it might not be the exact size they put on. And tire size varies from brand to brand. VW (from what I understand) can be as much as 5% off. Probably to help fake MPG numbers. But all in all, it's good enough and you don't really need to care unless you seriously go from stock size (like offroaders will do). Cops and the courts understand this and don't target the exact speed limit, but allow wiggle room. Some more than others, but always enough to cover the difference. It also means if you are diligently driving the speed limit, as per your speedo, you may be passed by someone doing the same thing with.

    The calorie estimates are "good enough". If your experience is dramatically different, then you are likely making a mistake. Yeah, there are people with absorption issues (and guys running 44 inch tires), but in general you either know about them or need to see a doctor. Barring a serious medical issue, you are going to be good enough with the models.

    What's the likelihood the expected error on my car is 20%? I feel like this could be compelling next time I'm doing 120 in a 100 zone.

    Have you got 44 inch tires on it?

    I've seen guys who are off that much. Most get it fixed at the tranny/transfer case with aftermarket products or software patches.

    44 inch tires on my car would look a lot like this:

    maxresdefault.jpg

    And????

    I'm short. I'd need a ladder to climb in. Seems like an awful lot of effort to get out of an alleged speeding ticket or two.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 8,878Member Member Posts: 8,878Member Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Are the assumptions and formulas used to calculate CI and CO going to be 100% exact for everyone...well, no....but nothing is and it doesn't have to be to be extremely useful. Chances are (and I mean that in the literal stats sense) that of someone calorie tracking and it doesn't match their weight change it will be more likely to be inaccurate tracking than 3-sigma special snowflake status.

    Was thinking about this and I think I thought of a good example of something else that is accepted as "good enough" to clarify.

    My speedometer is off by 2%. So when I'm going 100kmh, my truck says 102. I've tested this against a GPS. GM (my truck brand) calibrates their speedos to a standard tire size, but it might not be the exact size they put on. And tire size varies from brand to brand. VW (from what I understand) can be as much as 5% off. Probably to help fake MPG numbers. But all in all, it's good enough and you don't really need to care unless you seriously go from stock size (like offroaders will do). Cops and the courts understand this and don't target the exact speed limit, but allow wiggle room. Some more than others, but always enough to cover the difference. It also means if you are diligently driving the speed limit, as per your speedo, you may be passed by someone doing the same thing with.

    The calorie estimates are "good enough". If your experience is dramatically different, then you are likely making a mistake. Yeah, there are people with absorption issues (and guys running 44 inch tires), but in general you either know about them or need to see a doctor. Barring a serious medical issue, you are going to be good enough with the models.

    What's the likelihood the expected error on my car is 20%? I feel like this could be compelling next time I'm doing 120 in a 100 zone.

    Have you got 44 inch tires on it?

    I've seen guys who are off that much. Most get it fixed at the tranny/transfer case with aftermarket products or software patches.

    For this you have a serious answer.

    Now that's funny.

    ;) ;) ;)
  • nutmegoreonutmegoreo Posts: 13,236Member Member Posts: 13,236Member Member
    nutmegoreo wrote: »
    Aaron_K123 wrote: »
    Are the assumptions and formulas used to calculate CI and CO going to be 100% exact for everyone...well, no....but nothing is and it doesn't have to be to be extremely useful. Chances are (and I mean that in the literal stats sense) that of someone calorie tracking and it doesn't match their weight change it will be more likely to be inaccurate tracking than 3-sigma special snowflake status.

    Was thinking about this and I think I thought of a good example of something else that is accepted as "good enough" to clarify.

    My speedometer is off by 2%. So when I'm going 100kmh, my truck says 102. I've tested this against a GPS. GM (my truck brand) calibrates their speedos to a standard tire size, but it might not be the exact size they put on. And tire size varies from brand to brand. VW (from what I understand) can be as much as 5% off. Probably to help fake MPG numbers. But all in all, it's good enough and you don't really need to care unless you seriously go from stock size (like offroaders will do). Cops and the courts understand this and don't target the exact speed limit, but allow wiggle room. Some more than others, but always enough to cover the difference. It also means if you are diligently driving the speed limit, as per your speedo, you may be passed by someone doing the same thing with.

    The calorie estimates are "good enough". If your experience is dramatically different, then you are likely making a mistake. Yeah, there are people with absorption issues (and guys running 44 inch tires), but in general you either know about them or need to see a doctor. Barring a serious medical issue, you are going to be good enough with the models.

    What's the likelihood the expected error on my car is 20%? I feel like this could be compelling next time I'm doing 120 in a 100 zone.

    Good luck with that. I know what my answer to you would be. >:)
    Please sign at the bottom. Press hard, there's five copies.

    Meanie. :tongue:
  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 4,644Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,644Member, Premium Member
    .
    edited January 12
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