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BMI CONTROVERSY‼️🤬

WW1984WW1984 Posts: 145Member Member Posts: 145Member Member
Hey MFP Fam,

Ok . . . We all know that the Body Mass index (BMI) is a screening tool that can indicate whether a person is underweight, healthy weight, excess weight, or obesity. If a person's BMI is outside of the healthy range, their health risks may increase significantly. But we’ve also heard experts say that "BMI is flawed".

I’m 48 at a mere 4’ 10” and 116 lbs with a tiny frame (goal weight 100 lbs). The BMI chart says that I’m within my weight range of 88.5 - 119.6 (BMI = 24.24 as Normal). So if it’s flawed then what the H-E-double hockey stick are we to use other than just going by appearances, health exams, etc. ⁉️😫
edited December 2018
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Replies

  • WW1984WW1984 Posts: 145Member Member Posts: 145Member Member
    Hi CMRIVERSIDE. I understand your perception. I’ve updated the post to include all people. Unfortunately I continuously struggle with my weight as a result from being short and in my forties. I looked ok at 120 but was considered overweight and possibly at a health risk.
  • pinuplovepinuplove Posts: 12,155Member Member Posts: 12,155Member Member
    WW1984 wrote: »
    Hi CMRIVERSIDE. I understand your perception. I’ve updated the post to include all people. Unfortunately I continuously struggle with my weight as a result from being short and in my forties. I looked ok at 120 but was considered overweight and possibly at a health risk.

    120 is 0.4 pounds outside the magical 'healthy' range. That's not statistically significant and well within the daily fluctuation range of weight.

    If you have specific health concerns, you should discuss them with your doctor. Usually, being a few pounds above normal BMI with no other issues (high BP, cholesterol, blood sugar etc.) is NBD from a general health perspective.

    ETA are you being charged more for insurance or otherwise penalized for this 0.4 pounds? I'm still confused. However, there are a couple of voluminous BMI threads in the debate folder that have examined the issue from every possible angle of you're interested.
    edited December 2018
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 2,209Member Member Posts: 2,209Member Member
    If I felt good and liked how I looked at BMI 26 or whatever as much as I do at BMI 22, I'd likely not worry about losing. It's not a big deal to be a bit above the healthy range, especially if you exercise and eat well, and actual fat percentage is what's really important, most people just don't have an accurate way of determining it.
  • ritzvinritzvin Posts: 2,370Member, Premium Member Posts: 2,370Member, Premium Member
    I think it's common to feel like the weights are too low - until you get there. Looking at people around us who are over weight makes it seem like the numbers must be skewed, but when you get there the lightbulb goes on!

    Yep- totally this! (I'm 4'10", ~112-116 lbs).
  • mph323mph323 Posts: 3,197Member Member Posts: 3,197Member Member
    To elaborate on @kimny72 's comment:

    BMI has nothing to do with the way you look at a healthy weight. Different people have different views of their "ideal" body and how it should look. Many times people are happier with how they look at a weight that's over or under the "healthy" range. Another person looking at them may think they could stand to gain or lose a few pounds. This is subjective and not measurable, and doesn't have a bearing on the objective statistical population-level morbidity rates that BMI measures.

    Your personal morbidity risk is dependent on a number of factors in addition to your weight, such as body fat percent, smoking, drug/alcohol use, family history, etc. BMI doesn't address any of those metrics, all it indicates is that in the population from which data was collected (which is enormous, and growing all the time), the statistical chance of dying at any given time rises with the amount that a person is outside of the optimal weight range.

    Here's a thread further down on this page with an extensive discussion of BMI:

    https://community.myfitnesspal.com/en/discussion/10681147/bmi-agree-or-disagree/p1
    edited December 2018
  • BZAH10BZAH10 Posts: 5,402Member Member Posts: 5,402Member Member
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    Personally, I find that BMI is generally a good guideline for the majority of people, but I did just have a case yesterday where I was affected by my BMI. I scheduled an upcoming shoulder surgery for mid January, and when doing so, I was forced to also schedule a pre-op physical based solely on the fact that my BMI puts me slightly into the overweight range. If I was in the normal range I would not have had to pass a physical. I am 6'2" 197 lbs and my bodyfat % is sub 10%. I was aware that I am 3-4 lbs into the overweight category but it never bothered me until yesterday when my surgeons office insisted I schedule a physical based only on my BMI. I don't have a problem with BMI being used as a guideline for people, but I think that strictly enforcing these guidelines just like what happened to me yesterday is ridiculous. Doctors offices, and insurance companies do need to recognize that there will be outliers and need to have secondary measures in place in those cases(height to waist ratio or whatever). With that being said, I believe that most people who think they are outliers actually are not, and sometimes people need to be honest with themselves and realize that they are larger than they should be.

    Oh wow. I hope as soon as they saw you the dismissed the need for a physical! That is ridiculous.
  • Duck_PuddleDuck_Puddle Posts: 2,432Member Member Posts: 2,432Member Member
    BZAH10 wrote: »
    wmd1979 wrote: »
    Personally, I find that BMI is generally a good guideline for the majority of people, but I did just have a case yesterday where I was affected by my BMI. I scheduled an upcoming shoulder surgery for mid January, and when doing so, I was forced to also schedule a pre-op physical based solely on the fact that my BMI puts me slightly into the overweight range. If I was in the normal range I would not have had to pass a physical. I am 6'2" 197 lbs and my bodyfat % is sub 10%. I was aware that I am 3-4 lbs into the overweight category but it never bothered me until yesterday when my surgeons office insisted I schedule a physical based only on my BMI. I don't have a problem with BMI being used as a guideline for people, but I think that strictly enforcing these guidelines just like what happened to me yesterday is ridiculous. Doctors offices, and insurance companies do need to recognize that there will be outliers and need to have secondary measures in place in those cases(height to waist ratio or whatever). With that being said, I believe that most people who think they are outliers actually are not, and sometimes people need to be honest with themselves and realize that they are larger than they should be.

    Oh wow. I hope as soon as they saw you the dismissed the need for a physical! That is ridiculous.

    I don’t think they would have. The notion behind requiring the physical was probably due to overall potential risks involved being higher (for someone at a higher BMI because of excess fat). Visually, he clearly is extremely healthy and not at higher risk due to weight. On forms and checkboxes and things where liability issues are at stake-I’m going ro assume a physical was required.
  • cmriversidecmriverside Posts: 27,627Member Member Posts: 27,627Member Member
    That BMI/surgery thing? I've had multiple surgeries when I was a lot more over weight than wmd1979.
    @wmd1979, has it been a long time since you had a physical? I have one every year, but I've never been referred back by a surgeon in order to get surgery.

    That's weird, unless you just never go to the doctor.
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