Calorie Counter

You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Maintaining help

2»

Replies

  • AudreyJDukeAudreyJDuke Posts: 867Member Member Posts: 867Member Member
    Great feedback!!!!
  • AJ_GAJ_G Posts: 4,158Member Member Posts: 4,158Member Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    AJ_G wrote: »
    AJ_G wrote: »
    Step 1: Don't make the mistake of trying to maintain after losing weight, switch into a reverse diet for long term success.

    Can you explain what a reverse diet is?

    Sure, when you lose weight, your metabolism slows down to adapt to the weight loss. Look up "Adaptive Thermogenesis". Reverse dieting takes advantage of adaptive thermogenesis, but in the opposite direction. Basically you very slowly increase your calorie intake over the course of 4 to 8 months. By the end of the reverse, your maintenance calorie intake will be hundreds of calories higher than it was after your weight loss, which makes maintaining your weight much easier, or your next weight loss cycle much easier because you can eat more while losing weight. Most people don't know about reverse dieting, and of those who do, many do not have the stomach for it because it requires a small amount of weight gain (usually less than 5 pounds) but people are SO SCARED of gaining even a single pound after losing weight that they can't commit and bail on the process that could have set them up for long term success.

    Please don't listen to any of this.

    This is not how adaptive thermogenesis works. Adaptive thermogenesis is a very temporary situation largely influenced by incoming food and trends to the average after a matter of days.

    Basal metabolism is nothing more than a series of biochemical reactions. This increases and decreases by a near undetectable rate in the same manner as a fire works - add fuel and get a hotter fire, but quicker burn - add less fuel and you get lower heat.

    Though it is true that much more research is needed on reverse dieting, flat out saying that it is BS is foolish. I'll be the first to say that anecdotal evidence is no substitute for empirical data, but to completely dismiss it and not even say "hey we don't know how well it works, or why exactly it might work, but let's see", is closed minded and arrogant...
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,374Member Member Posts: 5,374Member Member
    AJ_G wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    AJ_G wrote: »
    AJ_G wrote: »
    Step 1: Don't make the mistake of trying to maintain after losing weight, switch into a reverse diet for long term success.

    Can you explain what a reverse diet is?

    Sure, when you lose weight, your metabolism slows down to adapt to the weight loss. Look up "Adaptive Thermogenesis". Reverse dieting takes advantage of adaptive thermogenesis, but in the opposite direction. Basically you very slowly increase your calorie intake over the course of 4 to 8 months. By the end of the reverse, your maintenance calorie intake will be hundreds of calories higher than it was after your weight loss, which makes maintaining your weight much easier, or your next weight loss cycle much easier because you can eat more while losing weight. Most people don't know about reverse dieting, and of those who do, many do not have the stomach for it because it requires a small amount of weight gain (usually less than 5 pounds) but people are SO SCARED of gaining even a single pound after losing weight that they can't commit and bail on the process that could have set them up for long term success.

    Please don't listen to any of this.

    This is not how adaptive thermogenesis works. Adaptive thermogenesis is a very temporary situation largely influenced by incoming food and trends to the average after a matter of days.

    Basal metabolism is nothing more than a series of biochemical reactions. This increases and decreases by a near undetectable rate in the same manner as a fire works - add fuel and get a hotter fire, but quicker burn - add less fuel and you get lower heat.

    Though it is true that much more research is needed on reverse dieting, flat out saying that it is BS is foolish. I'll be the first to say that anecdotal evidence is no substitute for empirical data, but to completely dismiss it and not even say "hey we don't know how well it works, or why exactly it might work, but let's see", is closed minded and arrogant...

    I did not say it was BS. I clarified a stated misconception of adaptive thermogenesis.

    Without data there is nothing to dismiss other than an uninformed opinion.

    This is neither "closed minded" or "arrogant", but rational.
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 1,514Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,514Member, Premium Member
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    Take a look at the National Weight Control Registry and their findings.

    http://www.nwcr.ws/Research/default.htm

    There is variety in how NWCR members keep the weight off. Most report continuing to maintain a low calorie, low fat diet and doing high levels of activity.

    78% eat breakfast every day.
    75% weigh themselves at least once a week.
    62% watch less than 10 hours of TV per week.
    90% exercise, on average, about 1 hour per day.

    Several veterans of MFP have registered here and a common element is setting a "higher" goal than just weight. You need some hobby or activity encouraging a healthy weight, so that this becomes secondary and automatic.

    Good link brother! I will also add, that gaining a few pounds after such a massive loss is not always a bad thing. The body is very depleted after a loss like that. I maintainedish for 17 months then decided it was time to let my body drift up a little. I am having to remember this. I lost 220, if I regain 20 and feel better.... then so be it. Nest wishes.
  • psychod787psychod787 Posts: 1,514Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,514Member, Premium Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    Take a look at the National Weight Control Registry and their findings.

    http://www.nwcr.ws/Research/default.htm

    There is variety in how NWCR members keep the weight off. Most report continuing to maintain a low calorie, low fat diet and doing high levels of activity.

    78% eat breakfast every day.
    75% weigh themselves at least once a week.
    62% watch less than 10 hours of TV per week.
    90% exercise, on average, about 1 hour per day.

    Several veterans of MFP have registered here and a common element is setting a "higher" goal than just weight. You need some hobby or activity encouraging a healthy weight, so that this becomes secondary and automatic.

    Good link brother! I will also add, that gaining a few pounds after such a massive loss is not always a bad thing. The body is very depleted after a loss like that. I maintainedish for 17 months then decided it was time to let my body drift up a little. I am having to remember this. I lost 220, if I regain 20 and feel better.... then so be it. BEST wishes.
    also wanted to add... AT is most likely real. To what degree... we don't know. There have been so few HIGHLY controlled studies in it. We will have to wait and see what the research will reveal in the future.

  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 5,374Member Member Posts: 5,374Member Member
    psychod787 wrote: »
    psychod787 wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    Take a look at the National Weight Control Registry and their findings.

    http://www.nwcr.ws/Research/default.htm

    There is variety in how NWCR members keep the weight off. Most report continuing to maintain a low calorie, low fat diet and doing high levels of activity.

    78% eat breakfast every day.
    75% weigh themselves at least once a week.
    62% watch less than 10 hours of TV per week.
    90% exercise, on average, about 1 hour per day.

    Several veterans of MFP have registered here and a common element is setting a "higher" goal than just weight. You need some hobby or activity encouraging a healthy weight, so that this becomes secondary and automatic.

    Good link brother! I will also add, that gaining a few pounds after such a massive loss is not always a bad thing. The body is very depleted after a loss like that. I maintainedish for 17 months then decided it was time to let my body drift up a little. I am having to remember this. I lost 220, if I regain 20 and feel better.... then so be it. BEST wishes.
    also wanted to add... AT is most likely real. To what degree... we don't know. There have been so few HIGHLY controlled studies in it. We will have to wait and see what the research will reveal in the future.

    Adaptive thermogenesis is most certainly real, but not in any long term way with a meaningful impact. We already have this data with an expected 20% margin of error. If data exists outside this, then it is most likely due to experimental error.
2»
Sign In or Register to comment.