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High fat or low fat dairy

fandslock22fandslock22 Posts: 16Member Member Posts: 16Member Member
High fat or low fat dairy... which one? info please!!!🙂
edited May 21

Replies

  • zeejane03zeejane03 Posts: 993Member Member Posts: 993Member Member
    Whichever best fits into the overall context of your diet?

    There is no best answer nutritionally. Some people enjoy getting fat from dairy, others prefer to save those calories and get their fat from other sources. Some people skip the dairy completely.

    This.

    I use a mix of 0%-full fat dairy, just depends on what the item is and how I'm using it.
    edited February 13
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,288Member Member Posts: 1,288Member Member
    I buy full fat everything these days. The only exceptions were some yogurts that had low fat in really small, faint lettering. Still tastes ok though.
  • Sunshine_And_SandSunshine_And_Sand Posts: 1,142Member Member Posts: 1,142Member Member
    -Milk = either 1% or 2%, whichever has the one with the freshest date
    - cheese = I've been buying full fat lately but can't taste much difference in full fat and 2% and can even tolerate 1% cheese. Fat free cheese is gross on several levels
    - Yogurt, I don't really have a preference in full fat, low fat, or even fat free
    - Sour cream, I typically get full fat bc DH kids want that kind, but I still like lite sour cream and don't even mind fat free if it's what's available

    You have to decide on your own if the lower fat content's lower calories is enough of a payoff to offset the difference in flavor.
  • FflpnariFflpnari Posts: 709Member Member Posts: 709Member Member
    I like full fat cheese and sour cream. I have a low fat ice-cream and thats just because I like that favor!
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 7,624Member Member Posts: 7,624Member Member
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    I buy full fat everything these days. The only exceptions were some yogurts that had low fat in really small, faint lettering. Still tastes ok though.

    I'm in the "it depends" camp. I tend to get enough fats without really trying. I don't eat much dairy but the one thing I do eat fairly regularly is plain yogurt mixed with a protein powder. It's one of the prime sources of protein for me. This yogurt I eat 0 fat. I'll occasionally have some pizza and that is whatever cheese is put on it. We make it at home more often than eat out, so that is full fat.

    Not really a big cheese eater or milk drinker and have my coffee black and a little ice cream from time to time. So, that is about all the dairy I eat.

    Part of me has the logic of fat storage in mind. Overall energy balance is the first priority. But the easiest macronutrient to store as fat is fat. This is one of the ironies, for me, of all the keto craze, less margin for error with the highest energy load and most easily stored macro.

    It's a metabolically expensive process to create fat from carbs and even more so with protein.

    As I get adequate fats from my diet overall without really focusing on it, when I've tracked I was getting 60 to 80 grams per day, I limit other fats somewhat and keep my focus on protein. Doing this also lets carbs just fall where they may. For me, that's around 150 grams per day on average. Not that high.

    Calorie wise, this logic probably only makes a >10% difference overall. Satiety wise, this way of eating works for me in terms of managing hunger and giving me good energy and gym performance. Not saying this works for everyone. Just my conclusions through trial and error over the years.

    TL/DNR version. I don't eat much dairy but don't usually spend the calories on full fat based on the dairy in my diet.


  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 1,750Member, Premium Member Posts: 1,750Member, Premium Member
    For milk/sour cream/cottage cheese, I usually like to go with the 2% version. I don't get much milk usually though, just the latter two. TBH I don't mind Skim milk that much though since I usually use it with cereal so I don't notice that much of a difference.

    For deli cheese, I usually eat either Colby Jack (full fat) or Mozzarella (part-skim)

    I don't really do much yogurt anymore, and I've never been one much for ice cream. On the occasion that I have them, they are usually full fat (the lower fat versions just end up with more sugar).
  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 2,209Member Member Posts: 2,209Member Member
    Whatever you prefer. I'm currently experimenting with high fat everything for dairy, but I am likely going to go back to including some 0% and 2% greek yogurt and some 2% cottage cheese (although I like to buy those foods at the farmers market and you often cannot find anything but full fat there). Reasoning: for some things I prefer the taste of 0% greek yogurt (I like it for sour cream like uses), and I don't find that full fat tastes any better or more satisfying to me than 2%, so the extra calories are annoying, and tend to mean I consume less dairy and it's less useful as a protein source.

    Cheese and butter for me are always full fat, as is ice cream/frozen yogurt.

    I don't really consume milk, although I sometimes put goat's milk in smoothies if I happen to buy it on a whim.
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,288Member Member Posts: 1,288Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    I buy full fat everything these days. The only exceptions were some yogurts that had low fat in really small, faint lettering. Still tastes ok though.

    I'm in the "it depends" camp. I tend to get enough fats without really trying. I don't eat much dairy but the one thing I do eat fairly regularly is plain yogurt mixed with a protein powder. It's one of the prime sources of protein for me. This yogurt I eat 0 fat. I'll occasionally have some pizza and that is whatever cheese is put on it. We make it at home more often than eat out, so that is full fat.

    Not really a big cheese eater or milk drinker and have my coffee black and a little ice cream from time to time. So, that is about all the dairy I eat.

    Part of me has the logic of fat storage in mind. Overall energy balance is the first priority. But the easiest macronutrient to store as fat is fat. This is one of the ironies, for me, of all the keto craze, less margin for error with the highest energy load and most easily stored macro.

    It's a metabolically expensive process to create fat from carbs and even more so with protein.

    As I get adequate fats from my diet overall without really focusing on it, when I've tracked I was getting 60 to 80 grams per day, I limit other fats somewhat and keep my focus on protein. Doing this also lets carbs just fall where they may. For me, that's around 150 grams per day on average. Not that high.

    Calorie wise, this logic probably only makes a >10% difference overall. Satiety wise, this way of eating works for me in terms of managing hunger and giving me good energy and gym performance. Not saying this works for everyone. Just my conclusions through trial and error over the years.

    TL/DNR version. I don't eat much dairy but don't usually spend the calories on full fat based on the dairy in my diet.


    The satiety is a huge one for me as I'm still learning to 'balance' what to eat and when to avoid cravings. I don't want to be overly restrictive, which is why I stopped IF - just a bit too hungry towards the end of the fast - and energy I never seem to have enough of.

    I saw folks here recommending higher protein/fats to stay satisfied longer, tried it and it works for me. I'm going to try the yogurt + protein powder you mentioned too :)

    This statement "It's a metabolically expensive process to create fat from carbs and even more so with protein." is still waay above my pay grade lol.
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 7,624Member Member Posts: 7,624Member Member
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    I buy full fat everything these days. The only exceptions were some yogurts that had low fat in really small, faint lettering. Still tastes ok though.

    I'm in the "it depends" camp. I tend to get enough fats without really trying. I don't eat much dairy but the one thing I do eat fairly regularly is plain yogurt mixed with a protein powder. It's one of the prime sources of protein for me. This yogurt I eat 0 fat. I'll occasionally have some pizza and that is whatever cheese is put on it. We make it at home more often than eat out, so that is full fat.

    Not really a big cheese eater or milk drinker and have my coffee black and a little ice cream from time to time. So, that is about all the dairy I eat.

    Part of me has the logic of fat storage in mind. Overall energy balance is the first priority. But the easiest macronutrient to store as fat is fat. This is one of the ironies, for me, of all the keto craze, less margin for error with the highest energy load and most easily stored macro.

    It's a metabolically expensive process to create fat from carbs and even more so with protein.

    As I get adequate fats from my diet overall without really focusing on it, when I've tracked I was getting 60 to 80 grams per day, I limit other fats somewhat and keep my focus on protein. Doing this also lets carbs just fall where they may. For me, that's around 150 grams per day on average. Not that high.

    Calorie wise, this logic probably only makes a >10% difference overall. Satiety wise, this way of eating works for me in terms of managing hunger and giving me good energy and gym performance. Not saying this works for everyone. Just my conclusions through trial and error over the years.

    TL/DNR version. I don't eat much dairy but don't usually spend the calories on full fat based on the dairy in my diet.


    The satiety is a huge one for me as I'm still learning to 'balance' what to eat and when to avoid cravings. I don't want to be overly restrictive, which is why I stopped IF - just a bit too hungry towards the end of the fast - and energy I never seem to have enough of.

    I saw folks here recommending higher protein/fats to stay satisfied longer, tried it and it works for me. I'm going to try the yogurt + protein powder you mentioned too :)

    This statement "It's a metabolically expensive process to create fat from carbs and even more so with protein." is still waay above my pay grade lol.

    Gotta run out right now but will explain this more later. And chocolate whey powder makes nonfat plain yogurt taste like chocolate mousse!

    Also, I see I used the wrong symbol. Al that makes<10% difference.
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,288Member Member Posts: 1,288Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    So, I find protein highly satiating. I don't find that to be true of fats for me. I do find high fiber fruits, vegetables and grains highly satiating. YMMV.
    To explain the protein and carbs fat storage thing, the simple explanation is:

    There are 2 metabolic processes. Gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis.

    Gluconeogenesis is the process by which dietary protein is converted to glucose in the absence of adequate carbohydrates. It is a metabolic expensive process. It burns a few extra calories and is not the body's prefered pathway to generate blood glucose.

    De novo lipogenesis is the body's pathway for converting dietary carbohydrates to fat in the event of an excess. Again, it is a metabolically expensive process and is not the body's preferred pathway.

    This means the body will resist storing that excess carbs and protein as fat. Instead, it will preferentially store dietary fat until it has no other choice.

    I hope this helps. Additionally, I just wanted to take a moment to let you know how much I appreciate your approach here on the forums. You have an open mind and seek facts. You have a teachable spirit. It is refreshing and I wanted to recognize that. Good on you!
    @mmapags - first, thank you for taking the time to explain that. Second, thank you for the encouragement, very much. This is one the few forums I've personally visited where folks will go to such lengths to help new people out, and to explain things the way you just did. Elsewhere the reply would have been "google is your friend" lol. So thank you again.

    Lastly - I have trouble with snacks, and that chocolate protein and yogurt...lets just say I love some chocolate mousse :)
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 7,624Member Member Posts: 7,624Member Member
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    So, I find protein highly satiating. I don't find that to be true of fats for me. I do find high fiber fruits, vegetables and grains highly satiating. YMMV.
    To explain the protein and carbs fat storage thing, the simple explanation is:

    There are 2 metabolic processes. Gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis.

    Gluconeogenesis is the process by which dietary protein is converted to glucose in the absence of adequate carbohydrates. It is a metabolic expensive process. It burns a few extra calories and is not the body's prefered pathway to generate blood glucose.

    De novo lipogenesis is the body's pathway for converting dietary carbohydrates to fat in the event of an excess. Again, it is a metabolically expensive process and is not the body's preferred pathway.

    This means the body will resist storing that excess carbs and protein as fat. Instead, it will preferentially store dietary fat until it has no other choice.

    I hope this helps. Additionally, I just wanted to take a moment to let you know how much I appreciate your approach here on the forums. You have an open mind and seek facts. You have a teachable spirit. It is refreshing and I wanted to recognize that. Good on you!
    @mmapags - first, thank you for taking the time to explain that. Second, thank you for the encouragement, very much. This is one the few forums I've personally visited where folks will go to such lengths to help new people out, and to explain things the way you just did. Elsewhere the reply would have been "google is your friend" lol. So thank you again.

    Lastly - I have trouble with snacks, and that chocolate protein and yogurt...lets just say I love some chocolate mousse :)

    Yeah, 6 oz of yogurt and 1 scoop of protein powder gets you about 35 grams of tasty protein for under 250 calories! I get Siggi's or one of the other greek yogurts that are strained and have the highest amount of protein per serving.
  • susansmckenziesusansmckenzie Posts: 6Member Member Posts: 6Member Member

    [/quote]

    The satiety is a huge one for me as I'm still learning to 'balance' what to eat and when to avoid cravings. I don't want to be overly restrictive, which is why I stopped IF - just a bit too hungry towards the end of the fast - and energy I never seem to have enough of.

    I saw folks here recommending higher protein/fats to stay satisfied longer, tried it and it works for me. I'm going to try the yogurt + protein powder you mentioned too :)

    This statement "It's a metabolically expensive process to create fat from carbs and even more so with protein." is still waay above my pay grade lol. [/quote]

    So, I find protein highly satiating. I don't find that to be true of fats for me. I do find high fiber fruits, vegetables and grains highly satiating. YMMV.
    To explain the protein and carbs fat storage thing, the simple explanation is:

    There are 2 metabolic processes. Gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis.

    Gluconeogenesis is the process by which dietary protein is converted to glucose in the absence of adequate carbohydrates. It is a metabolic expensive process. It burns a few extra calories and is not the body's prefered pathway to generate blood glucose.

    De novo lipogenesis is the body's pathway for converting dietary carbohydrates to fat in the event of an excess. Again, it is a metabolically expensive process and is not the body's preferred pathway.

    This means the body will resist storing that excess carbs and protein as fat. Instead, it will preferentially store dietary fat until it has no other choice.

    I hope this helps. Additionally, I just wanted to take a moment to let you know how much I appreciate your approach here on the forums. You have an open mind and seek facts. You have a teachable spirit. It is refreshing and I wanted to recognize that. Good on you![/quote]

    I really appreciate this dialog about considering satiety and the storage difference of excess carbs, proteins and fats.

    I wonder if the macro ratio is less important (outside of nutrient & satiety difference) on days I have a calorie deficit. My thinking is: if I have a deficit, I'm not storing what I eat. If I'm going to eat a protein that is much higher in saturated fat than my usual source, should I aim to eat it on a day I am certain to have a calorie deficit vs a day I might not? Or is it all averaged out over time?

  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,288Member Member Posts: 1,288Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »

    Yeah, 6 oz of yogurt and 1 scoop of protein powder gets you about 35 grams of tasty protein for under 250 calories! I get Siggi's or one of the other greek yogurts that are strained and have the highest amount of protein per serving.
    Thanks, I'm looking forward to trying that - got to go burn calories chasing a shopping cart. :)
  • mmapagsmmapags Posts: 7,624Member Member Posts: 7,624Member Member

    The satiety is a huge one for me as I'm still learning to 'balance' what to eat and when to avoid cravings. I don't want to be overly restrictive, which is why I stopped IF - just a bit too hungry towards the end of the fast - and energy I never seem to have enough of.

    I saw folks here recommending higher protein/fats to stay satisfied longer, tried it and it works for me. I'm going to try the yogurt + protein powder you mentioned too :)

    This statement "It's a metabolically expensive process to create fat from carbs and even more so with protein." is still waay above my pay grade lol. [/quote]

    So, I find protein highly satiating. I don't find that to be true of fats for me. I do find high fiber fruits, vegetables and grains highly satiating. YMMV.
    To explain the protein and carbs fat storage thing, the simple explanation is:

    There are 2 metabolic processes. Gluconeogenesis and de novo lipogenesis.

    Gluconeogenesis is the process by which dietary protein is converted to glucose in the absence of adequate carbohydrates. It is a metabolic expensive process. It burns a few extra calories and is not the body's prefered pathway to generate blood glucose.

    De novo lipogenesis is the body's pathway for converting dietary carbohydrates to fat in the event of an excess. Again, it is a metabolically expensive process and is not the body's preferred pathway.

    This means the body will resist storing that excess carbs and protein as fat. Instead, it will preferentially store dietary fat until it has no other choice.

    I hope this helps. Additionally, I just wanted to take a moment to let you know how much I appreciate your approach here on the forums. You have an open mind and seek facts. You have a teachable spirit. It is refreshing and I wanted to recognize that. Good on you![/quote]

    I really appreciate this dialog about considering satiety and the storage difference of excess carbs, proteins and fats.

    I wonder if the macro ratio is less important (outside of nutrient & satiety difference) on days I have a calorie deficit. My thinking is: if I have a deficit, I'm not storing what I eat. If I'm going to eat a protein that is much higher in saturated fat than my usual source, should I aim to eat it on a day I am certain to have a calorie deficit vs a day I might not? Or is it all averaged out over time?

    [/quote]

    I personally dont work much at timing nutrients. It averages out over time. The exception is that I am very focused on protein intake day of and day after my weight training. So that's 6 day per week with 3 training days. Maximizing MPS.
  • fandslock22fandslock22 Posts: 16Member Member Posts: 16Member Member
    Thank you for all your comments on low fat and full fat dairy. VERY helpful information all around. :)
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