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What new or revised public policy/law would make it easier for people to maintain a healthy weight?

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  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 470Member Member Posts: 470Member Member
    mmapags wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    CSARdiver wrote: »
    mmapags wrote: »
    ceiswyn wrote: »
    Nor do you fix it by paying for them.

    You just pass the costs on to those who choose to take a more proactive approach.

    Stop passing along costs to others and the costs for those no longer having the costs of others passed to them will go down.

    If people wish to voluntarily take on those costs, I'm all for it.

    I'm not in favor of someone, especially those who buy votes with other people's money, choosing to pass costs on to me and my family.

    That is not equal to not wishing to help. I simply think using government fiat is the worst way to make any real, lasting, and meaningful change.
    ceiswyn wrote: »
    ceiswyn wrote: »
    It is my understanding that a significant number of the 'emergencies' seen in US hospitals wouldn't have been emergencies had they been treated earlier. But the health insurance model makes people, especially on low incomes, reluctant to seek said early medical treatment.

    Maybe, instead of forcing hospitals to absorb the costs of emergency care, the costs are owed by those getting the care. Since patients can ignore the bill for emergency care, you may lower costs by changing the system so the patient is on the hook for the costs, period, making it a better choice for them to get care early, when the costs to them are lower.

    When costs are shifted to others, there is no incentive to change behavior.

    When costs are borne by those who incur them, they tend to seek lower cost solutions.

    Except that people are already trying to avoid incurring costs - by avoiding getting healthcare in the hope that the problem will go away / wait until they can get to a physician that will cost them less.

    In other words, people trying to avoid incurring costs is actually the problem. You're not going to fix that by making it worse.

    Given that medical costs are much, much higher in the US than they are in countries with socialised healthcare systems, are you sure that you don't fix the problem by paying for people to get preventative healthcare...?
    http://time.com/2888403/u-s-health-care-ranked-worst-in-the-developed-world/?fbclid=IwAR0Ar_moC2NR1sbjrt6-AkA2CGJSJjJUK9m9ystJtSdpRNrVJLQaZtbShTo

    To your point, medical costs in the U.S. are the highest by a factor of 1.8 and the worst quality of care in the developed world. I think there is something broken in a society that does not make the health of its people an affordable priority. Not every one of the other countries has socialized medicine either. But the fact remains they deliver higher quality of care at a substantially lower cost. Why can't the U.S. figure this out? We also have the highest rate of medical expense related bankruptcy. What is wrong with this picture?

    The substantially lower cost originates from subsidies provided by the US.

    We don't figure it out because there is no incentive for those in power to do so. They are making profit off of the existing system and will make more under single payer. All they have to do is promise to do something, do nothing, but hold the pretense of compassion. Verba non facta rules the day, but the same personalities and families remain in office.


    Anyone else finding the irony of a debate advocating for collective control of health on a site where success is solely achieved through personal responsibility and accountability?
    I'm unclear exactly what you mean by the bolded. Are you saying the U.S. is subsidizing the healthcare of the other top industrialized nations? And if so, please substantiate this claim.

    Governments other than the US set drug prices. The US does not. Through congressional action the US bargains with innovators in establishing price, so the ~2.6 B investment to bring a drug to market can be recomped, typically at a 5% industry margin.

    Not all drug companies are located in the U.S. This doesn't represent a "subsidy" to other countries and there is much more that goes into the costs of healthcare delivery than just drug prices. Did you take time to read the article? It talks specifically about patient outcomes and satisfaction.

    The vast majority of innovations originate via the US regulatory pipeline, both in pharmaceutical and medical device. Note that even many European innovators are opting for the US pipeline.

    Of course there is much more in determining the cost of any product group, but deliberate insertion of middle men can only increase the cost, so your hope in either reducing cost or increasing access has no chance of success.

    Not much there to read. I'm sure someone advocating for a collectivized system finds comfort in such an article, but it doesn't offer anything for someone looking for objective data.




    Besides that article, I posted other rankings a couple of posts up. The fact remains that the U.S. is the highest cost by far and not in the top 10 in the most favorable ranking of outcomes. You may view this as hopeless but it being done all over the world.

    If the U.S. drug development pipeline is the most business friendly in the world, that hasn't seemed to improve outcomes for U.S. residents at all. One could almost swallow it if our costs were the highest but our outcomes were the best. Based on the data that is not the case.

    FTR, I am not specifically advocating for a collectivized system. If so many other countries are getting better outcomes at lower costs, I would think that bears some study and emulation of best practices. That would really be making America great again IMHO.

    Part of the issue with US healthcare is the poor quality of its customers. Higher levels of obesity, lower levels of fitness, etc than other developed countries.
  • rheddmobilerheddmobile Posts: 4,511Member Member Posts: 4,511Member Member
    I have no problem if universal healthcare is voluntary and optional.

    My problem is when you FORCE people to participate or contribute.

    Have whatever system you want, as long as it is not mandatory and is funded ONLY with money voluntarily given.
    FireOpalCO wrote: »
    Why? Why does a single payer healthcare system need to be voluntary? What is unique to it that does not apply to everything else that is paid for by taxes? I don't decide how much I pay towards the military each year. Neither do I pick each year my contribution to roads, schools, or a myriad of other government provided services. Where on my tax form do I pick how much I want to contribute to our State Department?

    Because we are a nation of free people. We are a Republic, not a Democracy. Majority rules gives you things such as slavery and bans on same sex marriage, and bans on interracial marriage and so on.

    This nation was not founded on collective rights. There is no right of the majority. Only INDIVIDUALS have rights. Not even the government has rights. Rights are bestowed only upon individuals.

    The only way that is maintained is when we recognize and defend the rights of individuals. If we have majority rules, someone loses their rights.

    So any system or scheme proposed by government must be 100% voluntary. There is no right to demand that others fall into line with some view of "the greater good" just because 50% + 1 person votes for it.

    Maybe the question to ask is why have we allowed our Federal Government to usurp our rights. The roles of the Federal Government, as spelled out by the Constitution are pretty small. Most things people fight about such as police, fire, roads, and so on if they are the responsibility of any governmental unit, are local or state, not Federal.

    Having money go to DC and then to have your representatives in Congress try to bring the money back to the community to build a new fire station is the height of insanity. Like the 535 members of Congress, plus the President and VP know better what you need than the people of your own community is laughable.

    It's probably an oversimplification, but the real roles of the Federal Government are: Defense, Foreign Policy, and a Federal Judiciary.

    That's pretty much it.
    FireOpalCO wrote: »

    Part of being a democracy is sometimes you pay for things that don't benefit you personally or that you don't value. At certain points in our history we decided that some items that weren't provided by the government should be paid for by tax dollars and funded by everyone, not just the "in the moment need" or the largess of the rich. Public schools, fire departments, police, judges, social workers, etc.


    Good thing we live in a Representative Republic that was founded on the idea of individual freedom. If we were following the lead of the founders, you wouldn't be asked to pay for what you don't support.

    I think the founders, faults and all, recognized the dangers of concentrated power. How concentrated power erodes freedom.

    Why not voluntary?

    ...

    VOLUNTARY is key, as it will act as a check on those making the choices. If the care doesn't meet the promises, people should be free to leave the program and not be locked in to endless contributions by law.
    kimny72 wrote: »
    The problem would be getting it up and running. Why would the wealthy, who can afford whatever system exists, or healthy people who are able to at least afford insurance premiums, switch right away? They would want to wait and see what happens. The people who would jump right in would be mostly low income or high usage, so there would be no way for it to be financially viable.

    Voluntary universal healthcare is a logic trap. You can't show it will be a good deal without knowing who will participate, and you can't convince people to participate if you can't show them it will be a good deal.

    I'm not saying single-payer or universal healthcare is the answer, I honestly have no idea what is. I'm just saying I don't think voluntary single-payer/universal healthcare is possible, it would just end up being a high risk insurance pool.

    If the system was better, wouldn't the wealthy be some of the first to come on board? It's not like wealthy people are against saving money. In fact, I'd argue that they may have a pretty good handle on value. Not all the wealthy are newly minted Instagram Influencers, Rock Stars or Star Athletes with new-found riches in the lottery of life. Many have built companies, often out of what they had in their garage, and now have billions.

    Any system that would lower healthcare costs for them and/or their enterprises would be welcomed, right?

    Wouldn't bottom line focused CEOs welcome less costly alternatives to health care?

    Large companies "self-insure" meaning while there may be an insurance company on the benefits card, they are paying them for access to the network, pre-negotiated rates, and administration. The benefits costs are paid by the company. There may be some re-insurance for catastrophic events. But by and large, day to day benefits are paid by the employer, not the insurance company.

    If someone came in saying we can provide even better care for less money, what company wouldn't get on board?

    It's not unreasonable to expect they prove they will be lower cost. So while I recognize the chicken and egg nature of things, understand that mandatory participation provides less incentive to actually get better. If your clients are captive through the force of law, do things really get better?

    Do you want the same people who architect the IRS, the VA and the DoD to now be in charge of an additional 15% of the economy, healthcare?

    The Federal G already accounts for about 20% of GDP and IIRC, healthcare is right around that 15% figure. So great, let's just put 1/3rd of all economic activity under the control of Congress (who cannot get along, but still manages to send pork back to the district) and the President (who knows who you might get. Can you trust this one, or the next one? Probably depends on your political leanings.)
    I’m curious, since your statements seem absolute, if you believe ANY taxes should be mandatory?
  • MotorsheenMotorsheen Posts: 14,920Member Member Posts: 14,920Member Member
    I’m curious, since your statements seem absolute, if you believe ANY taxes should be mandatory?

    Taxes should be rare and the greatest taxes should be local, not federal.

    Things like the TSA should be funded entirely by what is collected from passengers (if we are going to have a TSA, that's a whole different argument.)

    I am not so Libertarian that I think taxes are theft.

    HOWEVER, the way DC is doing it, a solid case could be made that a great deal is being stolen from the taxpayer to fund political power grabs.

    Things like Social Security should be optional, and certainly shouldn't have graduated payouts. When you look at how AIME (I think I've mentioned it before) is paid at smaller and smaller values. Some AIME is paid back at 90%, then the payout drops to 32% and finally to 15%.

    <snip... I started to write a bunch about AIME and bend points and such, but I put myself to sleep in the wonky details. Suffice it to say that if it is such a good deal for workers, why not let workers decide if they really wish to participate or not and to what extent.>

    So we steal from middle class workers, because let's be clear, the uber rich are no longer paying Social Security taxes on wages above about $130K to fund those getting the 90% payout on their wages.

    If such programs had to rely on people opting in, they would go away.

    So while not all taxation is theft, much of how it is done today, not to mention how it is spent looks a great deal ike theft, or at least a bad deal for the typical taxpayer.

    When a middle income worker loses 40% of a marginal dollar earned to Federal Income and Payroll taxes and state income tax, before the remaining bucket of taxes are paid, it's hard to argue that he's not paying more than his fair share when it comes to tax burden.

    That was my last paycheck. I had 80 hours of regular labor and about 26 hours of overtime. The overtime wages paid my FEDERAL tax burden.

    I'm not a rich man.

    So I don't trust that "Free College" or "Free Healthcare" or any of the other "Freebies" are actually going to save me any money.

    I did get about a 3% drop in my tax burden for 2018, but that's temporary as Congress wasn't able to pass lasting income tax reform.

    And at the same time, after paying all those taxes, Social Security only wants to pay me 15% on about half of my indexed wages when I retire, but will give others 90% of their indexed wages.

    So yes, I do feel like I'm robbed at times.

    Go tax those who want the freebies at my marginal rates.

    Let me forego all the freebies in exchange for the lowest marginal rates.


    wait.

    ..... does this mean that the government won't be buying me a new motorcycle ?






    drat.
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 802Member, Premium Member Posts: 802Member, Premium Member
    Motorsheen wrote: »

    ..... does this mean that the government won't be buying me a new motorcycle ?






    drat.

    And neither will I ;)
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 6,088Member Member Posts: 6,088Member Member
    I think implementing laws that limit the size of sodas sold at restaurants and fast food places would be beneficial. No one needs a 44oz full sugar soda from the gas station.

    Also controlled portion sizes/limits. You go out to eat and you get two meals for the price of one at a lot of places. Instead of offering large portions directly on your plate, restaurants could offer a free take-away box with every purchase, encouraging you to eat it at a later time. Very few people need a 16-20oz steak, or a half-pound burger. Those are way over the recommended daily serving for any gender and most activity levels.
    wah2uspkjbx8.jpeg

    Great evil is conducted via the notion "nobody needs".
  • Theoldguy1Theoldguy1 Posts: 470Member Member Posts: 470Member Member
    I think implementing laws that limit the size of sodas sold at restaurants and fast food places would be beneficial. No one needs a 44oz full sugar soda from the gas station.

    Also controlled portion sizes/limits. You go out to eat and you get two meals for the price of one at a lot of places. Instead of offering large portions directly on your plate, restaurants could offer a free take-away box with every purchase, encouraging you to eat it at a later time. Very few people need a 16-20oz steak, or a half-pound burger. Those are way over the recommended daily serving for any gender and most activity levels.
    wah2uspkjbx8.jpeg

    Too many loopholes around limiting size. If you want to discourage consumption, just tax it like alcohol.
  • PineAndSaltPineAndSalt Posts: 22Member Member Posts: 22Member Member
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    Too many loopholes around limiting size. If you want to discourage consumption, just tax it like alcohol.
    This is true. Most developed countries have implemented a sugary drink tax, but in conjunction some have also required the amount of sugar in those products to be reduced by a certain percentage. France also implemented a law that refills on sugary drinks are no longer allowed.

    I hope that the US would eventually follow the example.

    52rczydyockv.jpeg
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