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If money was no issue... organic.

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  • amusedmonkeyamusedmonkey Posts: 9,684Member Member Posts: 9,684Member Member
    If money was not an issue, I would buy what tastes better to me without worrying about the cost. The organic status of it would not be a consideration because taste is the most important aspect of food to me, followed by nutritional status. Since nutritional status differences are marginal, I go by taste first and foremost.
  • vnylinvnylin Posts: 16Member Member Posts: 16Member Member
    I bake sourdough bread. I have switched to organic grains and flours and I can definitely taste a difference in my breads. It was enough of an improvement to warrant the extra expense and the resulting price hikes. My customers seem to be ok with it so I'm ok with it. :)

    I source all my grains from a regional mill, I know them, I know their standards. It's a win win. Not all organic is equal. The old caveat, "Let the buyer beware!" especially kicks in on the whole "organic" and "non-gmo" food thing. If you're not doing your due diligence, you're probably not getting what you think you are.

    But having said all that, the grain is my only "gotta be organic" thing. Frankly all the hype and bs puts me off my feed so to speak. I can't tell much difference in meats and such, and I'm not a huge fan of the grass fed beef flavor so I just buy decent beef. I grind my own burgers too so I don't worry about that.
  • dogWalkerTXdogWalkerTX Posts: 49Member Member Posts: 49Member Member
    My vegetables are locally sourced and organic. I have a vegetable garden. :)

    Nope. Not pay extra at the supermarket for "organic" which in this context is a completely unregulated term and who knows what it means.
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 865Member Member Posts: 865Member Member
    vnylin wrote: »
    I bake sourdough bread. I have switched to organic grains and flours and I can definitely taste a difference in my breads. It was enough of an improvement to warrant the extra expense and the resulting price hikes. My customers seem to be ok with it so I'm ok with it. :)

    I source all my grains from a regional mill, I know them, I know their standards. It's a win win. Not all organic is equal. The old caveat, "Let the buyer beware!" especially kicks in on the whole "organic" and "non-gmo" food thing. If you're not doing your due diligence, you're probably not getting what you think you are.

    But having said all that, the grain is my only "gotta be organic" thing. Frankly all the hype and bs puts me off my feed so to speak. I can't tell much difference in meats and such, and I'm not a huge fan of the grass fed beef flavor so I just buy decent beef. I grind my own burgers too so I don't worry about that.

    There is no commercially available GMO wheat (or cereals besides rice), so in the context of breads, sure, there's probably a good case for due diligence when someone is advertising a cereal grain as "non-gmo". Mainly, I'd be diligent in that someone trying to sell me something as non-GMO in that market is trying to prey on ignorance, so I'd be leery of what else they do as a business practice.
  • gentlygentlygentlygently Posts: 688Member Member Posts: 688Member Member
    I do my best to buy food that I understand to be better for the environment (birds and bees ie organic), humanely raised (not factory farmed), responsibly fished (aware of over-fishing etc). I buy my cleaning products carefully too. I also try not to buy from shops with poor supply chain practise (who wants to knowingly eat the product of slavery?).

    The fact that I think some of what I buy tastes better (eg free range v factory chicken...!) is a bonus. It is not my motivation and I certainly don’t think ‘my’ apple is better for me than ‘yours’.

    A century ago food took up half of people’s wages. No longer true for most of us, and if need be, I can go without the odd treat to do my best to live as kindly to others and our planet as I know how. But actually my shopping bills are pretty much in the ‘norm’ last time I checked. Perhaps I cook more from scratch, and eat less meat/more offal than some.

    (Btw I hate supermarket shopping too - my suggestion is to buy food online and get a veg box delivered weekly. I first started buying organic regularly as a by-product of the fact I wanted someone else to select and deliver my veg..!)

    Oh - pro GM food by the way. You might not have been expecting that!

    An interesting debate.
  • gentlygentlygentlygently Posts: 688Member Member Posts: 688Member Member
    Thanks for the further info suggestion LarziPanda - I’ve had a look, and yup I would be happy to buy from her farm. She is clearly a passionate/conpassionate farmer.

    But, personally, I’m not convinced by many of her broader arguments. Of course that could be ‘confirmation bias’ -er, in either of us! I wish I could find the right ‘label’ that suits my concerns - I’ll continue to make do with organic, fsc, fairtrade. Free range etc . And do my best to shop conciously - but certainly not perfectly!
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Posts: 823Member, Premium Member Posts: 823Member, Premium Member
    If money were no issue it is probably because you are value conscious. Slapping an organic label on something doesn't automatically make it better.

    I'm not sure I'm getting 50% more by paying 50% more for organic bananas compared to those that do not get the organic label.
  • John5877John5877 Posts: 12Member Member Posts: 12Member Member
    So much of the agriculture that most in the US see is not food that we directly eat (corn, soybeans, cotton, although wheat is a big one with wide growth areas in the US) ...so often we stereotype THAT for the same that is producing our fruits and veggies.

    The food we actually eat that is produced in America comes from pretty isolated areas in a few states, or it grows on trees that may seldom come into contact with pesticides whether certified organic or not (I'm sorry, but organic pecans make me LOL; can't think of a single local grower using pesticides ever on those). Organic varieties are often farmed right across the road from non.

    I find there's varieties within fruits and veggies that I prefer whether organic or not. That matters more to me than a label.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,687Member Member Posts: 12,687Member Member
    John5877 wrote: »
    So much of the agriculture that most in the US see is not food that we directly eat (corn, soybeans, cotton, although wheat is a big one with wide growth areas in the US) ...so often we stereotype THAT for the same that is producing our fruits and veggies.

    The food we actually eat that is produced in America comes from pretty isolated areas in a few states, or it grows on trees that may seldom come into contact with pesticides whether certified organic or not (I'm sorry, but organic pecans make me LOL; can't think of a single local grower using pesticides ever on those). Organic varieties are often farmed right across the road from non.
    I find there's varieties within fruits and veggies that I prefer whether organic or not. That matters more to me than a label.

    Living in a big tree-fruit state (Michigan - which also has many other agricultural exports), it kinda makes me LOL to hear that anyone believes that "the food we actually eat that is produced in America . . . grows on trees that may seldom come into contact with pesticides". We don't have a font big enough, or a bold font bold enough, for that word "may" in there, if one's gonna make that argument. ;)

    I have friends who are (conventional) fruit farmers; I've grown tree fruits recreationally; I live a handful of miles down the road from a major agriculture university's research orchards (and a separate organic farm) and drive by both close to daily all year long. Seldom come in contact with pesticides? Heh. I dunno about pecans - not a crop here - but tree fruits? Heh.
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 865Member Member Posts: 865Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    John5877 wrote: »
    So much of the agriculture that most in the US see is not food that we directly eat (corn, soybeans, cotton, although wheat is a big one with wide growth areas in the US) ...so often we stereotype THAT for the same that is producing our fruits and veggies.

    The food we actually eat that is produced in America comes from pretty isolated areas in a few states, or it grows on trees that may seldom come into contact with pesticides whether certified organic or not (I'm sorry, but organic pecans make me LOL; can't think of a single local grower using pesticides ever on those). Organic varieties are often farmed right across the road from non.
    I find there's varieties within fruits and veggies that I prefer whether organic or not. That matters more to me than a label.

    Living in a big tree-fruit state (Michigan - which also has many other agricultural exports), it kinda makes me LOL to hear that anyone believes that "the food we actually eat that is produced in America . . . grows on trees that may seldom come into contact with pesticides". We don't have a font big enough, or a bold font bold enough, for that word "may" in there, if one's gonna make that argument. ;)

    I have friends who are (conventional) fruit farmers; I've grown tree fruits recreationally; I live a handful of miles down the road from a major agriculture university's research orchards (and a separate organic farm) and drive by both close to daily all year long. Seldom come in contact with pesticides? Heh. I dunno about pecans - not a crop here - but tree fruits? Heh.

    Farming, the one thing MSU outdoes UofM in.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Posts: 12,687Member Member Posts: 12,687Member Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    John5877 wrote: »
    So much of the agriculture that most in the US see is not food that we directly eat (corn, soybeans, cotton, although wheat is a big one with wide growth areas in the US) ...so often we stereotype THAT for the same that is producing our fruits and veggies.

    The food we actually eat that is produced in America comes from pretty isolated areas in a few states, or it grows on trees that may seldom come into contact with pesticides whether certified organic or not (I'm sorry, but organic pecans make me LOL; can't think of a single local grower using pesticides ever on those). Organic varieties are often farmed right across the road from non.
    I find there's varieties within fruits and veggies that I prefer whether organic or not. That matters more to me than a label.

    Living in a big tree-fruit state (Michigan - which also has many other agricultural exports), it kinda makes me LOL to hear that anyone believes that "the food we actually eat that is produced in America . . . grows on trees that may seldom come into contact with pesticides". We don't have a font big enough, or a bold font bold enough, for that word "may" in there, if one's gonna make that argument. ;)

    I have friends who are (conventional) fruit farmers; I've grown tree fruits recreationally; I live a handful of miles down the road from a major agriculture university's research orchards (and a separate organic farm) and drive by both close to daily all year long. Seldom come in contact with pesticides? Heh. I dunno about pecans - not a crop here - but tree fruits? Heh.

    Farming, the one thing MSU outdoes UofM in.

    So wrong. ;) (Go Green!)

    I have great loyalty to any institution that treats me well, and signs my paychecks for 30 years, admittedly. ;)
    edited May 16
  • LolinloggenLolinloggen Posts: 324Member Member Posts: 324Member Member
    I have to admit that I am of the school of chemistry, where all food are organic in essence. Organic and the prices are IMO weird. It ranges from still large scale to the Rudolf teenier theories.
    To me the term organic and knowing what types of (organic) pesticides etc they are using I am not that concerned about organic plant based foods. I do buy the misfits and oddly shaped ones because I don't care about the odd spot etc.
    I do care about animal friendly husbandry, but there is no need for that to be organic (not included in most organic certs). To me the treatment of the animal is much more important than the organic label.
  • johnslater461johnslater461 Posts: 449Member Member Posts: 449Member Member
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    edited May 26
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