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  • AutumLeafAutumLeaf Posts: 126Member Member Posts: 126Member Member
    newmeadow wrote: »
    As long as psychologically atypical aren't posing a danger to the people they come in contact with, I'm fine with it.

    But if they threaten others with violence, act out violently toward others or otherwise make the people they come in contact with miserable as a result of their behavior, I'm not okay with it.

    People with mental health issues are actually more likely to be abused by other people. It's only a minority of people with mental health issues that are violent.
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Posts: 2,691Member Member Posts: 2,691Member Member
    OMG I was hoping this thread would be somewhere. My mental health has deteriorated since weightloss. Very low self worth and self esteem. Seeking the approving of others and feel like I've lost not only wirght but control of my mind. Hope everyone is doing well in their journeys.

    I wonder if it's the transition that you have undergone, weight loss wise ? Did you lose a lot of weight, if you don't mind me asking.
  • Mm2Hh7Mm2Hh7 Posts: 1,415Member Member Posts: 1,415Member Member
    my mental health suffers due to my increasing deteriorating health and my inability to work at the job i loved or even volunteer for that matter. my immunity is so weak that the more people i come into contact, the higher probability of getting dangerously ill increases. today is especially bad... i don't know how much more i can handle

    I’m so sorry you’re going through this. I have a lot of health problems too. Not as severe as yours, but I am always here if you wanna talk. 🤗
  • Mm2Hh7Mm2Hh7 Posts: 1,415Member Member Posts: 1,415Member Member
    Cowsfan1 wrote: »
    Vikka_V wrote: »
    I was talking with the father of someone I knew who passed away suddenly due to mental health issues today about how "we" as a culture or just normal human whatever don't tell people how much we like, admire, appreciate, enjoy them. It's just not what we do, usually.

    Then after they die, people all talk about the deceased and appreciate them (it's kinda like "behind their backs" I was thinking).

    I wonder if it would have made a difference in their life to have said "I like you for *whatever*"?

    I feel bad that I didn't notice or recognize their struggle, and severity of it.

    Dallas Green said it best "it’s like a man’s best party only happens when he dies” .. it is a shame

    I love that song! ❤️
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Posts: 2,691Member Member Posts: 2,691Member Member
    I have had my own struggles with mental health over the years, sometimes the struggles were worse than others, let's just put it that way! But I'm still here and I now work as a peer support worker, basically using my own life experience to help others. So I guess from all that seemingly useless, painful times I went through, it's now been turned into a positive thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is. A situation may seem like there is no way out, and no way to become positive. I am living proof that is not the case. And how it all started changing for me? Was when I finally opened up and spoke to someone I could trust. That was it. That was the first crucial step in a long recovery process. Keeping it all inside will really hurt your head ! But yeah, firstly you must know that your unwell. If you have friends or loved ones who point stuff out to you or perhaps they feel you should visit a doctor, they are only looking out for you. Maybe they can see something you can't right now.

    Your mental health matters. 💗
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Posts: 2,691Member Member Posts: 2,691Member Member
    We all have a mental health condition. The human condition. Nobody truly has their *kitten* together and we are all beautifully flawed.

    It really can be a bit of an illusion can't it. People can perceive other people as having it all, or having it all worked out. It's just an illusion. We all have our problems.
  • Mm2Hh7Mm2Hh7 Posts: 1,415Member Member Posts: 1,415Member Member
    I have had my own struggles with mental health over the years, sometimes the struggles were worse than others, let's just put it that way! But I'm still here and I now work as a peer support worker, basically using my own life experience to help others. So I guess from all that seemingly useless, painful times I went through, it's now been turned into a positive thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is. A situation may seem like there is no way out, and no way to become positive. I am living proof that is not the case. And how it all started changing for me? Was when I finally opened up and spoke to someone I could trust. That was it. That was the first crucial step in a long recovery process. Keeping it all inside will really hurt your head ! But yeah, firstly you must know that your unwell. If you have friends or loved ones who point stuff out to you or perhaps they feel you should visit a doctor, they are only looking out for you. Maybe they can see something you can't right now.

    Your mental health matters. 💗

    💗💗
  • amorfati601070amorfati601070 Posts: 1,022Member Member Posts: 1,022Member Member
    We all have a mental health condition. The human condition. Nobody truly has their *kitten* together and we are all beautifully flawed.

    It really can be a bit of an illusion can't it. People can perceive other people as having it all, or having it all worked out. It's just an illusion. We all have our problems.

    Yes, that is why it is so unhealthy to compare yourself to others which is easier said than done. Remember, those people that appear “have it all” can also lose it all, and it’s in our nature to usually want more. We solve one problem, only to make another. It’s a tragedy.

    The only thing that is certain in this life is that it is uncertain so sometimes you just gotta let go and Amor fati.
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Posts: 2,691Member Member Posts: 2,691Member Member
    We all have a mental health condition. The human condition. Nobody truly has their *kitten* together and we are all beautifully flawed.

    It really can be a bit of an illusion can't it. People can perceive other people as having it all, or having it all worked out. It's just an illusion. We all have our problems.

    Yes, that is why it is so unhealthy to compare yourself to others which is easier said than done. Remember, those people that appear “have it all” can also lose it all, and it’s in our nature to usually want more. We solve one problem, only to make another. It’s a tragedy.

    The only thing that is certain in this life is that it is uncertain so sometimes you just gotta let go and Amor fati.

    I think this is where social media can be a negative influence since it's full of people who seemingly have their *kitten* together and our youth are constantly being fed a diet of how they should look, what they should be wearing yada yada yada. People are bombarded with these messages 24/7 365 days a year. Our young people are growing up In a world so different now.
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Posts: 2,691Member Member Posts: 2,691Member Member
    Cowsfan1 wrote: »
    Vikka_V wrote: »
    Cowsfan1 wrote: »
    Vikka_V wrote: »
    I was talking with the father of someone I knew who passed away suddenly due to mental health issues today about how "we" as a culture or just normal human whatever don't tell people how much we like, admire, appreciate, enjoy them. It's just not what we do, usually.

    Then after they die, people all talk about the deceased and appreciate them (it's kinda like "behind their backs" I was thinking).

    I wonder if it would have made a difference in their life to have said "I like you for *whatever*"?

    I feel bad that I didn't notice or recognize their struggle, and severity of it.

    Dallas Green said it best "it’s like a man’s best party only happens when he dies” .. it is a shame
    Cowsfan1 wrote: »
    Vikka_V wrote: »
    I was talking with the father of someone I knew who passed away suddenly due to mental health issues today about how "we" as a culture or just normal human whatever don't tell people how much we like, admire, appreciate, enjoy them. It's just not what we do, usually.

    Then after they die, people all talk about the deceased and appreciate them (it's kinda like "behind their backs" I was thinking).

    I wonder if it would have made a difference in their life to have said "I like you for *whatever*"?

    I feel bad that I didn't notice or recognize their struggle, and severity of it.

    Dallas Green said it best "it’s like a man’s best party only happens when he dies” .. it is a shame

    Love Dallas Green's songs, Alexis on Fire and City and Colour...don't know that quote from what song...but so true
    And for me brought to attention twice so far in 2019

    which song are you referencing? Just curious...want to listen to it...and notice

    One of my favourites ( see what I did there )
    Body in a box


  • robertw486robertw486 Posts: 1,928Member, Greeter, Premium Member Posts: 1,928Member, Greeter, Premium Member
    I have had my own struggles with mental health over the years, sometimes the struggles were worse than others, let's just put it that way! But I'm still here and I now work as a peer support worker, basically using my own life experience to help others. So I guess from all that seemingly useless, painful times I went through, it's now been turned into a positive thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is. A situation may seem like there is no way out, and no way to become positive. I am living proof that is not the case. And how it all started changing for me? Was when I finally opened up and spoke to someone I could trust. That was it. That was the first crucial step in a long recovery process. Keeping it all inside will really hurt your head ! But yeah, firstly you must know that your unwell. If you have friends or loved ones who point stuff out to you or perhaps they feel you should visit a doctor, they are only looking out for you. Maybe they can see something you can't right now.

    Your mental health matters. 💗

    It's awesome that you work in a peer support position, and thank you for doing so.

    The stigma around mental health issues is slowly changing, and hopefully one day it will end. Until then, peer groups give people a place without judgement to help them find a path to recovery.

    I've been through my own struggles as well. Like a lot of people I had events in my life that I just sucked up and never fully processed. So I bottled it up and went on with life. And that worked great until one day it didn't. The "final straw" as they say, landed on my back. And things started going sideways in a hurry. Anxiety and depression dredged up major PTSD symptoms and created a downward spiral.

    I started going to some outpatient clinics to get some help, and moving towards sorting things out. I made job changes, started dealing better with family stresses, processing those things I had sidestepped for so long, and began coping with the inevitable death of my father who had terminal illness. I got on with life, was back to work full time, and enjoying life a lot more again.

    And then by chance one day I ran into some people that made me aware of a peer led group that was open to all and fit better with my work and life schedule. This group was started by a homeless veteran who was in inpatient treatment and thought he could make a better program. And he did. It started with no funding and really just to help homeless veterans transition. But as more people got involved the expanded the scope of the support. They won an innovation contest and got temporary funding, further expanded the program, and got more notice and support from the hospital director, staff, and veterans. Over time the data showed that it improved recovery in a number of addiction, mental health, and other aspects. It's now a national VA program.

    And what I have learned about myself and others in that program is nothing short of amazing. The power of people helping each other is incredible.


    @FeelinFooFoo fantastic thread. If you'd like to share I'd be interested in hearing more about the position you work in. AFAIK you just won Chit Chat. There is so much more to humans than selfies and animals!
  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Posts: 2,691Member Member Posts: 2,691Member Member
    robertw486 wrote: »
    I have had my own struggles with mental health over the years, sometimes the struggles were worse than others, let's just put it that way! But I'm still here and I now work as a peer support worker, basically using my own life experience to help others. So I guess from all that seemingly useless, painful times I went through, it's now been turned into a positive thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is. A situation may seem like there is no way out, and no way to become positive. I am living proof that is not the case. And how it all started changing for me? Was when I finally opened up and spoke to someone I could trust. That was it. That was the first crucial step in a long recovery process. Keeping it all inside will really hurt your head ! But yeah, firstly you must know that your unwell. If you have friends or loved ones who point stuff out to you or perhaps they feel you should visit a doctor, they are only looking out for you. Maybe they can see something you can't right now.

    Your mental health matters. 💗

    It's awesome that you work in a peer support position, and thank you for doing so.

    The stigma around mental health issues is slowly changing, and hopefully one day it will end. Until then, peer groups give people a place without judgement to help them find a path to recovery.

    I've been through my own struggles as well. Like a lot of people I had events in my life that I just sucked up and never fully processed. So I bottled it up and went on with life. And that worked great until one day it didn't. The "final straw" as they say, landed on my back. And things started going sideways in a hurry. Anxiety and depression dredged up major PTSD symptoms and created a downward spiral.

    I started going to some outpatient clinics to get some help, and moving towards sorting things out. I made job changes, started dealing better with family stresses, processing those things I had sidestepped for so long, and began coping with the inevitable death of my father who had terminal illness. I got on with life, was back to work full time, and enjoying life a lot more again.

    And then by chance one day I ran into some people that made me aware of a peer led group that was open to all and fit better with my work and life schedule. This group was started by a homeless veteran who was in inpatient treatment and thought he could make a better program. And he did. It started with no funding and really just to help homeless veterans transition. But as more people got involved the expanded the scope of the support. They won an innovation contest and got temporary funding, further expanded the program, and got more notice and support from the hospital director, staff, and veterans. Over time the data showed that it improved recovery in a number of addiction, mental health, and other aspects. It's now a national VA program.

    And what I have learned about myself and others in that program is nothing short of amazing. The power of people helping each other is incredible.


    @FeelinFooFoo fantastic thread. If you'd like to share I'd be interested in hearing more about the position you work in. AFAIK you just won Chit Chat. There is so much more to humans than selfies and animals!

    Hey well I work in support at home. Basically there has been so many cut backs that a lot of care homes and hospitals have shut down so people are being cared for in the community. My work is recovery focused and my job is to implement care plans, assisting and supporting the individual to be able to go onto maintaining their own occupancy is the goal. Some people need to be in care home settings though or in hospital and part of the process is deciding that this may be the best option for them. Some people can't maintain their own property due to severe and enduring metal health issues. Some have ARBD due to alcohol misuse, there is a lot of physical barriers also. Some people are elderly, some are institutionalised and struggle to cope outside of a hospital/care home setting.

    My peer support work complements the more practical aspects of the job and I will draw on my own lived experiences to offer support and advice. I will share my own life experience when it is appropriate and I feel able to do so. I think I also offer a lot of hope for people as they can see that I have achieved recovery and it is possible.

    I guess that is a little summary of what I do. I really enjoy my job. It can be very challenging at times, not least because people are suffering mental health, but just working with people in general. Some folks are hard work! And I think it's just personality clashes sometimes but I find my work very fulfilling. When I was ill I decided that I just wasn't a people person.

    I am SUCH a people person it's unreal! Lol think that's why I used to be so sad, I was a people person but I was isolated and had no connections. I think people thrive on good strong connections and I like to give back to the community as I received help from someone, now I return that. It's the circle of positivity. 💫
  • robertw486robertw486 Posts: 1,928Member, Greeter, Premium Member Posts: 1,928Member, Greeter, Premium Member
    robertw486 wrote: »
    I have had my own struggles with mental health over the years, sometimes the struggles were worse than others, let's just put it that way! But I'm still here and I now work as a peer support worker, basically using my own life experience to help others. So I guess from all that seemingly useless, painful times I went through, it's now been turned into a positive thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is. A situation may seem like there is no way out, and no way to become positive. I am living proof that is not the case. And how it all started changing for me? Was when I finally opened up and spoke to someone I could trust. That was it. That was the first crucial step in a long recovery process. Keeping it all inside will really hurt your head ! But yeah, firstly you must know that your unwell. If you have friends or loved ones who point stuff out to you or perhaps they feel you should visit a doctor, they are only looking out for you. Maybe they can see something you can't right now.

    Your mental health matters. 💗

    It's awesome that you work in a peer support position, and thank you for doing so.

    The stigma around mental health issues is slowly changing, and hopefully one day it will end. Until then, peer groups give people a place without judgement to help them find a path to recovery.

    I've been through my own struggles as well. Like a lot of people I had events in my life that I just sucked up and never fully processed. So I bottled it up and went on with life. And that worked great until one day it didn't. The "final straw" as they say, landed on my back. And things started going sideways in a hurry. Anxiety and depression dredged up major PTSD symptoms and created a downward spiral.

    I started going to some outpatient clinics to get some help, and moving towards sorting things out. I made job changes, started dealing better with family stresses, processing those things I had sidestepped for so long, and began coping with the inevitable death of my father who had terminal illness. I got on with life, was back to work full time, and enjoying life a lot more again.

    And then by chance one day I ran into some people that made me aware of a peer led group that was open to all and fit better with my work and life schedule. This group was started by a homeless veteran who was in inpatient treatment and thought he could make a better program. And he did. It started with no funding and really just to help homeless veterans transition. But as more people got involved the expanded the scope of the support. They won an innovation contest and got temporary funding, further expanded the program, and got more notice and support from the hospital director, staff, and veterans. Over time the data showed that it improved recovery in a number of addiction, mental health, and other aspects. It's now a national VA program.

    And what I have learned about myself and others in that program is nothing short of amazing. The power of people helping each other is incredible.


    @FeelinFooFoo fantastic thread. If you'd like to share I'd be interested in hearing more about the position you work in. AFAIK you just won Chit Chat. There is so much more to humans than selfies and animals!

    Hey well I work in support at home. Basically there has been so many cut backs that a lot of care homes and hospitals have shut down so people are being cared for in the community. My work is recovery focused and my job is to implement care plans, assisting and supporting the individual to be able to go onto maintaining their own occupancy is the goal. Some people need to be in care home settings though or in hospital and part of the process is deciding that this may be the best option for them. Some people can't maintain their own property due to severe and enduring metal health issues. Some have ARBD due to alcohol misuse, there is a lot of physical barriers also. Some people are elderly, some are institutionalised and struggle to cope outside of a hospital/care home setting.

    My peer support work complements the more practical aspects of the job and I will draw on my own lived experiences to offer support and advice. I will share my own life experience when it is appropriate and I feel able to do so. I think I also offer a lot of hope for people as they can see that I have achieved recovery and it is possible.

    I guess that is a little summary of what I do. I really enjoy my job. It can be very challenging at times, not least because people are suffering mental health, but just working with people in general. Some folks are hard work! And I think it's just personality clashes sometimes but I find my work very fulfilling. When I was ill I decided that I just wasn't a people person.

    I am SUCH a people person it's unreal! Lol think that's why I used to be so sad, I was a people person but I was isolated and had no connections. I think people thrive on good strong connections and I like to give back to the community as I received help from someone, now I return that. It's the circle of positivity. 💫

    That's fantastic that you enjoy giving back in your work. And I do agree that one thing that can be given is hope. People feel at rock bottom and lose hope until they see examples of others who are no longer at rock bottom. And when the people helping them have been through some struggle of their own, it helps form a better trust and respect level.

    As for the people person thing, I completely get where you are coming from. As I started dealing with PTSD one of the first real red flags was isolating myself from contact with others.


    Thanks so much for what you do, and for starting the thread.

  • FeelinFooFooFeelinFooFoo Posts: 2,691Member Member Posts: 2,691Member Member
    robertw486 wrote: »
    robertw486 wrote: »
    I have had my own struggles with mental health over the years, sometimes the struggles were worse than others, let's just put it that way! But I'm still here and I now work as a peer support worker, basically using my own life experience to help others. So I guess from all that seemingly useless, painful times I went through, it's now been turned into a positive thing.

    I guess what I'm saying is. A situation may seem like there is no way out, and no way to become positive. I am living proof that is not the case. And how it all started changing for me? Was when I finally opened up and spoke to someone I could trust. That was it. That was the first crucial step in a long recovery process. Keeping it all inside will really hurt your head ! But yeah, firstly you must know that your unwell. If you have friends or loved ones who point stuff out to you or perhaps they feel you should visit a doctor, they are only looking out for you. Maybe they can see something you can't right now.

    Your mental health matters. 💗

    It's awesome that you work in a peer support position, and thank you for doing so.

    The stigma around mental health issues is slowly changing, and hopefully one day it will end. Until then, peer groups give people a place without judgement to help them find a path to recovery.

    I've been through my own struggles as well. Like a lot of people I had events in my life that I just sucked up and never fully processed. So I bottled it up and went on with life. And that worked great until one day it didn't. The "final straw" as they say, landed on my back. And things started going sideways in a hurry. Anxiety and depression dredged up major PTSD symptoms and created a downward spiral.

    I started going to some outpatient clinics to get some help, and moving towards sorting things out. I made job changes, started dealing better with family stresses, processing those things I had sidestepped for so long, and began coping with the inevitable death of my father who had terminal illness. I got on with life, was back to work full time, and enjoying life a lot more again.

    And then by chance one day I ran into some people that made me aware of a peer led group that was open to all and fit better with my work and life schedule. This group was started by a homeless veteran who was in inpatient treatment and thought he could make a better program. And he did. It started with no funding and really just to help homeless veterans transition. But as more people got involved the expanded the scope of the support. They won an innovation contest and got temporary funding, further expanded the program, and got more notice and support from the hospital director, staff, and veterans. Over time the data showed that it improved recovery in a number of addiction, mental health, and other aspects. It's now a national VA program.

    And what I have learned about myself and others in that program is nothing short of amazing. The power of people helping each other is incredible.


    @FeelinFooFoo fantastic thread. If you'd like to share I'd be interested in hearing more about the position you work in. AFAIK you just won Chit Chat. There is so much more to humans than selfies and animals!

    Hey well I work in support at home. Basically there has been so many cut backs that a lot of care homes and hospitals have shut down so people are being cared for in the community. My work is recovery focused and my job is to implement care plans, assisting and supporting the individual to be able to go onto maintaining their own occupancy is the goal. Some people need to be in care home settings though or in hospital and part of the process is deciding that this may be the best option for them. Some people can't maintain their own property due to severe and enduring metal health issues. Some have ARBD due to alcohol misuse, there is a lot of physical barriers also. Some people are elderly, some are institutionalised and struggle to cope outside of a hospital/care home setting.

    My peer support work complements the more practical aspects of the job and I will draw on my own lived experiences to offer support and advice. I will share my own life experience when it is appropriate and I feel able to do so. I think I also offer a lot of hope for people as they can see that I have achieved recovery and it is possible.

    I guess that is a little summary of what I do. I really enjoy my job. It can be very challenging at times, not least because people are suffering mental health, but just working with people in general. Some folks are hard work! And I think it's just personality clashes sometimes but I find my work very fulfilling. When I was ill I decided that I just wasn't a people person.

    I am SUCH a people person it's unreal! Lol think that's why I used to be so sad, I was a people person but I was isolated and had no connections. I think people thrive on good strong connections and I like to give back to the community as I received help from someone, now I return that. It's the circle of positivity. 💫

    That's fantastic that you enjoy giving back in your work. And I do agree that one thing that can be given is hope. People feel at rock bottom and lose hope until they see examples of others who are no longer at rock bottom. And when the people helping them have been through some struggle of their own, it helps form a better trust and respect level.

    As for the people person thing, I completely get where you are coming from. As I started dealing with PTSD one of the first real red flags was isolating myself from contact with others.


    Thanks so much for what you do, and for starting the thread.

    Aw thank you too 😊👍
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