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The most polarizing food: where do you stand?

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  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 3,868Member Member Posts: 3,868Member Member
    Before our trip to Cambodia a few years ago, I ordered the guacamole with fried grasshoppers at a pretty authentic Mexican restaurant in London.
    https://www.santoremedio.co.uk/

    I figured I should get over any aversion to eating insects prior to the trip. In Cambodia there was only one occasion where there were tree ants, tarantulas, and crickets on the menu. I ended up ordering the chicken that night.

    Incidentally, the deep fried grasshoppers on the guacamole in the Mexican retaurant tasted like peanuts.
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Posts: 1,215Member Member Posts: 1,215Member Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Initially I forgot what this thread was about and was confused that this was the response to taleggio.

    I love most cheeses. A favorite place because they have great cheese plates (and a great selection of cheeses which they will let you taste) is https://www.pastoralartisan.com/

    I had forgotten they had a cheese club, and really must look into it.

    I live in a very small community, so there aren't any really big grocery stores here - the one at the county seat is lucky to have a small deli!

    But I was in Cincinnati last year in a huge Krogers that had all sorts of specialty items, including a cheese bar with types of cheeses I'd never heard of. The girl running the bar was happy to allow my sister and I to sample some of them - it was an unexpected but neat addition to our vacation, and I came home with all sorts of cheese for the family to eat :)
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Posts: 5,050Member Member Posts: 5,050Member Member
    Fine if you are under 21, if you are an adult, it's time for grown-up food. I've literally never seen anyone over the age of 20 eat one of those in public.

    I think the adult palate can't really tolerate the intense sweetness of these cookies without a lot of practice first. Mostly, the cookies will make your throat burn and eyes water due to the intense amount of sugar. Kids can eat sugar straight and feel fine.

    That is just silly.

    IMO they (the cakes in OP) are not very appealing - I dont like pink icing and the cakes are too sweet and bland for me

    But making your throat burn and your eyes water???

    Serious nonsense there.

    Just because you dont like them doesnt mean you should make bizarre inaccurate statements about them - or strange judgments on others who do like them :s

  • Carlos_421Carlos_421 Posts: 4,852Member, Premium Member Posts: 4,852Member, Premium Member
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Initially I forgot what this thread was about and was confused that this was the response to taleggio.

    I love most cheeses. A favorite place because they have great cheese plates (and a great selection of cheeses which they will let you taste) is https://www.pastoralartisan.com/

    I had forgotten they had a cheese club, and really must look into it.

    I live in a very small community, so there aren't any really big grocery stores here - the one at the county seat is lucky to have a small deli!

    But I was in Cincinnati last year in a huge Krogers that had all sorts of specialty items, including a cheese bar with types of cheeses I'd never heard of. The girl running the bar was happy to allow my sister and I to sample some of them - it was an unexpected but neat addition to our vacation, and I came home with all sorts of cheese for the family to eat :)

    Was it a Kroger or did you go to Jungle Jim's?

    Because you should have gone to Jungle Jim's. Lol
  • DelicatelyDriftingDelicatelyDrifting Posts: 7Member Member Posts: 7Member Member
    I like them but I could live without them.
  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 3,868Member Member Posts: 3,868Member Member
    Another food and travel anecdote. We like to try to eat where the locals eat, where there won't be an English menu. One of our strategies for ordering in those places is to simply point to another table of 2, and just generally gesture "We'll have what they are having."

    This strategy did backfire once in Phnom Penh. We were at a food stall just outside the gates of the University. There was a table of students having a late lunch so we gestured for the stall owner to just bring us whatever they were eating. It turned out to be a pretty polarizing soup containing cubes of congealed blood and bits of lung plus a lot of other stuff I couldn't identify.
  • bmeadows380bmeadows380 Posts: 1,215Member Member Posts: 1,215Member Member
    Carlos_421 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    Initially I forgot what this thread was about and was confused that this was the response to taleggio.

    I love most cheeses. A favorite place because they have great cheese plates (and a great selection of cheeses which they will let you taste) is https://www.pastoralartisan.com/

    I had forgotten they had a cheese club, and really must look into it.

    I live in a very small community, so there aren't any really big grocery stores here - the one at the county seat is lucky to have a small deli!

    But I was in Cincinnati last year in a huge Krogers that had all sorts of specialty items, including a cheese bar with types of cheeses I'd never heard of. The girl running the bar was happy to allow my sister and I to sample some of them - it was an unexpected but neat addition to our vacation, and I came home with all sorts of cheese for the family to eat :)

    Was it a Kroger or did you go to Jungle Jim's?

    Because you should have gone to Jungle Jim's. Lol

    just a Kroger - never heard of Jungle Jim's. I'm a country gal visiting the big city, so I stuck to the main routes and pretty well stayed in the area I was in :)
  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 3,868Member Member Posts: 3,868Member Member
    The third and last time I tried to eat broccoli in Sicily. The first time in a Sicilian spaghetti with broccoli, it was so overcooked that it was greyish, and when I complained to the waiter he sent the cook out to chew me out. (How dare a Chinese woman tell an Italian how to cook broccoli?) I ordered the same dish somewhere else few days later and broccoli was again overcooked to a mush. Started to see a pattern forming. The last time I ordered broccoli was in this mixed vegetable side. Broccoli doesn't look terrible here but it was the texture of mush.
    qkqsh64cld4u.jpeg

  • nighthawk584nighthawk584 Posts: 664Member Member Posts: 664Member Member
    I HATE those Lofthouse sugar cookies. They look like they might be good, guilty pleasure type of sugary sweets...but they are VILE! :#

    Why do I feel like people aren't responding here because they have not tried this horrible trick of a cookie?

    I used to love those "vile" cookies..would eat the whole pack in one sitting. another reason I gained 100 lbs!
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Posts: 3,994Member Member Posts: 3,994Member Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    The third and last time I tried to eat broccoli in Sicily. The first time in a Sicilian spaghetti with broccoli, it was so overcooked that it was greyish, and when I complained to the waiter he sent the cook out to chew me out. (How dare a Chinese woman tell an Italian how to cook broccoli?) I ordered the same dish somewhere else few days later and broccoli was again overcooked to a mush. Started to see a pattern forming. The last time I ordered broccoli was in this mixed vegetable side. Broccoli doesn't look terrible here but it was the texture of mush.
    qkqsh64cld4u.jpeg

    Were you there in the winter when broccoli is in season or during the summer when they would have had to use frozen (mushier)? When in Italy it's a good idea to always eat the vegetables in season. As a side note: when I moved to Italy from Minnesota over 30 years ago my mother-in-law, who comes from Puglia, always overcooked vegetables. Green beans were never bright green, always army green. I wasn't used to it.
  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 3,868Member Member Posts: 3,868Member Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    The third and last time I tried to eat broccoli in Sicily. The first time in a Sicilian spaghetti with broccoli, it was so overcooked that it was greyish, and when I complained to the waiter he sent the cook out to chew me out. (How dare a Chinese woman tell an Italian how to cook broccoli?) I ordered the same dish somewhere else few days later and broccoli was again overcooked to a mush. Started to see a pattern forming. The last time I ordered broccoli was in this mixed vegetable side. Broccoli doesn't look terrible here but it was the texture of mush.

    Were you there in the winter when broccoli is in season or during the summer when they would have had to use frozen (mushier)? When in Italy it's a good idea to always eat the vegetables in season. As a side note: when I moved to Italy from Minnesota over 30 years ago my mother-in-law, who comes from Puglia, always overcooked vegetables. Green beans were never bright green, always army green. I wasn't used to it.

    We were in Palermo in April. Does that mean that we would have been getting frozen broccoli?
  • snowflake954snowflake954 Posts: 3,994Member Member Posts: 3,994Member Member
    acpgee wrote: »
    acpgee wrote: »
    The third and last time I tried to eat broccoli in Sicily. The first time in a Sicilian spaghetti with broccoli, it was so overcooked that it was greyish, and when I complained to the waiter he sent the cook out to chew me out. (How dare a Chinese woman tell an Italian how to cook broccoli?) I ordered the same dish somewhere else few days later and broccoli was again overcooked to a mush. Started to see a pattern forming. The last time I ordered broccoli was in this mixed vegetable side. Broccoli doesn't look terrible here but it was the texture of mush.

    Were you there in the winter when broccoli is in season or during the summer when they would have had to use frozen (mushier)? When in Italy it's a good idea to always eat the vegetables in season. As a side note: when I moved to Italy from Minnesota over 30 years ago my mother-in-law, who comes from Puglia, always overcooked vegetables. Green beans were never bright green, always army green. I wasn't used to it.

    We were in Palermo in April. Does that mean that we would have been getting frozen broccoli?

    Yes.
  • acpgeeacpgee Posts: 3,868Member Member Posts: 3,868Member Member
    Thanks for the tip for only eating seasonal vegetables in Italy. It makes me realize how decadent I am, expecting year round fresh broccoli, imported. I will try the pasta with broccoli again if I am in southern Italy in late fall.

    Having grown up on Chinese food, thoroughly cooked veg is a struggle for me. There are very few vegetables I can tolerate in an Indian restaurant, for example.
  • macchiattomacchiatto Posts: 2,862Member Member Posts: 2,862Member Member
    I love them as an option for my son with nut allergies, but I personally don't eat them. I'm a low-carber though (PCOS and insulin resistance).
  • MotherOfSharpeiMotherOfSharpei Posts: 1,076Member Member Posts: 1,076Member Member
    I would vomit if I tried to eat those ...just can't do icing.
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