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Is age "just a number"?

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  • Suuzanne37Suuzanne37 Posts: 105Member, Premium Member Posts: 105Member, Premium Member
    In today’s society; youth is glorified. The fact is; everyone does not grow older; “aging is a privilege, denied many”.

    I find that the reason the statement came about was because societies the world over want to put people in boxes; at this age you should not wear that, go there, do that; by that age you should have done this, done that. So individuals who do not want to be boxed in declare, “age is just a number”.

    If the journey of life was looked forward to; if the process of aging was not sometimes thought of as a fight; age would just be what it is, “time spent alive”.
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,420Member Member Posts: 1,420Member Member
    Suuzanne37 wrote: »
    In today’s society; youth is glorified. The fact is; everyone does not grow older; “aging is a privilege, denied many”.

    I find that the reason the statement came about was because societies the world over want to put people in boxes; at this age you should not wear that, go there, do that; by that age you should have done this, done that. So individuals who do not want to be boxed in declare, “age is just a number”.

    If the journey of life was looked forward to; if the process of aging was not sometimes thought of as a fight; age would just be what it is, “time spent alive”.
    Regarding the bolded, people of all age groups die (many needlessly, but that's another topic) but I wouldn't call aging a privilege beyond a certain demographic either. Not all who hit, say for discussions sake, 65 yo and up are happy, comfortable and yearning to live and enjoy life. Older age is extremely painful and lonely for lots of folks out there.

    For what it's worth, I'm looking forward to seeing how far life allows me to go. Currently loving where I'm at. :)
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,420Member Member Posts: 1,420Member Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    ~
    Any thoughts on the invisibility perception with age, if it's not too far off topic?

    Older folks I know tend to withdraw more than outgoing younger folks. I can be a little "in your face" at times and don't like to feel ignored (imagined usually lol) and do not ever feel 'invisible'...yet I know others even a bit younger than I am who tend to withdraw to the back of rooms/restaurants etc and just watch folks, listen, occasionally smile at people. I would say they're much more likely to feel ignored or invisible.

    In short, yes, I've heard of it and seen it a bit, but neither I nor my wife I would dare say have ever really experienced it.

    I have found the opposite. Once people get old they tend to give no *kitten* and are more bold. Once they get really old I have sometimes found it a little cringe-worthy how few *kitten* they give when out it public....

    Yeah now that you mention it, I know a couple of those too lol. Cringe-worthy it is.
  • smaerosesmaerose Posts: 8Member Member Posts: 8Member Member
    I am proud of my age (65). Why belittle yourself by saying it is just a number and implying that age sums you up? That is parroting some advertising slogan. It is also denial. I voluntarily stopped working at age 60. It just felt like it was time, Finances permitted it, and there were other things I wanted to do besides sitting behind a computer all day doing other peoples stuff while it was a beautiful day outside. Having as much fun now as I did at 18, but I know more. Of course I cannot do as much physically, and I do not lie to myself about that. A woman has to know her limitations...and her strengths.
  • VioletRojoVioletRojo Posts: 518Member, Premium Member Posts: 518Member, Premium Member
    smaerose wrote: »
    I am proud of my age (65). Why belittle yourself by saying it is just a number and implying that age sums you up? That is parroting some advertising slogan. It is also denial. I voluntarily stopped working at age 60. It just felt like it was time, Finances permitted it, and there were other things I wanted to do besides sitting behind a computer all day doing other peoples stuff while it was a beautiful day outside. Having as much fun now as I did at 18, but I know more. Of course I cannot do as much physically, and I do not lie to myself about that. A woman has to know her limitations...and her strengths.

    To me, the phrase means to opposite of the bolded. Age is just a number and as such it doesn't define me. It's just a measure of time and nothing more.


  • gradchica27gradchica27 Posts: 495Member Member Posts: 495Member Member
    hesn92 wrote: »
    Tne thing I have noticed is a lot of women who were thought of as particularly beautiful or sexy when they were younger seem to have a more difficult time letting go of their youth, than women who maybe were seen as average or not as attractive. I have discussed this at length with my mom. She was always a stunner with loads of attention from men and women alike, model level of pretty, and while she's also intelligent & capable, she was (and still is) pretty wrapped up in outward appearances. Meanwhile, I know I am not an ugly woman but I've always been very average and overweight and just didn't focus much on looks - beyond basic things like taking care of myself & dressing in clothes I like, a bit of makeup, and so forth. But I didn't put that much emphasis on my looks when I was younger - always focusing more on my job, hobbies, friends - and I think it's making the ageing process a lot easier for me. I may be wrong though, who knows. It will be interesting to see if I still feel the same at 52 and 62 regarding these topics.

    Interesting observation. I’ve found something similar with the caveat that some can change their focus—from looking “hot” to being strong or developing muscles or being a runner/lifter/adventure racer/whatever and maintain or improve their physique while avoiding the getting bummed about getting older.

    I’ve never been a knockout, but in my 30s I shifted my focus from being thin/looking good to getting stronger and learning new sports—rock climbing and kayaking. I’ve gotten stronger and am fitter than ever. Makes me not focus on wrinkles obtained from lots of outdoor activity when I can focus on building a stronger back. (Also, realistically, it seems juvenile and counterproductive at this point to aim for “hot”. Why? , I’m happily married with kids within a social circle of good looking women happily married with a bunch of kids...trying to be “hot” seems ridiculous and won’t bring meany benefits...already made the great catch!...seems like it would only invite cattiness,jealousy, envy, etc o my part. There’s plenty of better looking or thinner ladies in my group).
    beckyrpl wrote: »
    Anyone get the back-handed compliment 'you look great for your age'?! Sigh......I'm 53 - most of the time, I feel great - sometimes after a tough workout I feel like I'm 103. Often I'll pass by a mirror and think 'Who IS this wrinkled woman'?! My attitude is - yes, I'm going to age - but if I can stay healthy and fit - I'm okay with it!

    I get it more on the “you look good for having 4 kids!” 🙄
  • ilfaithilfaith Posts: 16,012Member Member Posts: 16,012Member Member
    I haven't lied about my age since I was 20 and trying to get into bars.

    In exactly one month I will celebrate my 50th birthday. Do I feel 50...sure, in that I feel as though I have 50 years of life experience. Do I feel the way I imagined 50 would be when I was 20? No. Obviously as I have aged, my perspective of what is "old" has changed. As a kid, if I heard somebody died at 60, I would think they lived a long full life. Now that 60 is a mere decade away, it seems tragically young. At 60 I will still have kids in college.

    In my 30s I was sure when I hit 50 I would be shopping exclusively at Talbot's and Chico's. But I am currently wearing denim cut-off shorts from American Eagle and a Target tank top. Would my mother have dressed this way at my age? No. She might give me side eye if she saw me now. But I am not ready to trade bikinis in for skirted one pieces from Land's End. I figure J.Lo and Jennifer Aniston are my age, so if they aren't too old to show a little skin, I'm not eirher.

    I am lucky enough not to have any major health issues. I try to stay active and eat well. Sometimes I feel a little creaky. Sometimes it takes longer than it used to to recover from a tough workout. Things are sagging more than they used to. I have laugh lines and frown lines, and I have to make more frequent trips to the salon to cover my increasingly grey hair. I know menopause is looming in my future, and as ready as I am to be over my monthly periods (still coming like clockwork) I am nervous about how it might change my body.

    But I don't dread getting older. My parents are in their 70s and loving their lives. They are active, playing pickle ball, doing yoga, performing in community theater. Their social lives are more active than mine.
  • RunsWithBeesRunsWithBees Posts: 982Member Member Posts: 982Member Member
    To me age is indeed just a number... it’s up to each individual to determine how important that number is or is not at any given moment. I see too many using the number as an excuse to let themselves off the hook for taking responsibility for their health and fitness and the truth is it’s never too late to improve yourself if you really want to and are willing to put in the work.
    edited June 15
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