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Fed Up: documentary

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  • lemurcat2lemurcat2 Posts: 3,326Member Member Posts: 3,326Member Member
    Never mind, I see you answered my question in a subsequent post, so I will address the subsequent post.
    edited July 10
  • cathipacathipa Posts: 2,886Member Member Posts: 2,886Member Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    Any documentary is biased to the agenda they are trying to achieve. There aren't many that OBJECTIVELY look at the opposing view. There is no obesity epidemic in Asian countries. And they eat processed foods, rice, sugar, etc. They just don't eat to damn much.


    A.C.E. Certified Personal and Group Fitness Trainer
    IDEA Fitness member
    Kickboxing Certified Instructor
    Been in fitness for 30 years and have studied kinesiology and nutrition

    9285851.png

    . https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6209725/

    https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/obesity-and-overweight
  • PhirrgusPhirrgus Posts: 1,904Member Member Posts: 1,904Member Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    aidydh wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aidydh wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aidydh wrote: »
    It is not an epidemic, yet.

    https://coach.nine.com.au/latest/10-reasons-why-the-japanese-have-avoided-the-obesity-crisis/5ce477ce-f3be-4a4d-a1a9-da0ff4ee812c

    The documentary addresses the difference that maintenance of weight is not as simple as CICO. Various foods have different effects on the body. The documentary actually addresses how the food industry should be held responsible for the types of food they manufacture, sell, and the high number of overly processed foods on the market.

    Are other "healthier" food choices available to the populations the documentary addresses? If so, then you're suggesting that it's not the individuals responsibility to make better choices and to eat an amount that will keep them at a healthy weight?

    Cakes and pastries and candies of all sorts have been around for an awful long time, so I think it's a bit disingenuous to start blaming companies who decided to turn a profit on them.

    Fish and veggies or half a cheesecake? Not my fault if you choose the one that slingshots you over your maintenance calories.

    One of the overarching themes of the documentary is to point out that various people in the health and food industry often cite poor choices as a problem for obesity. The documentary attempts to show that may not be the case.

    I may be missing something here: In the post of yours I quoted overly processed foods are bad and manufacturers should be held responsible, yet overly processed foods are often considered the "poor choice". But now the documentary says poor choices are not the problem?

    It's all about choice unless how a person feeds them self is taken completely out of their hands. What to eat? How much to eat? And so on.

    I'm fully aware there are outliers such as medical issues, areas that are scarce in certain types of food, or food starved period.

    Sorry, yes I can see how that is confusing. I wasn't clear in my statement. One of the themes in the documentary is that there are many sources at large that would say that it's simply the children's or parents fault for making poor choices for the child. However, the food industry will advertise certain foods as being "healthy" or "healthier" due to certain factors like having less fat (but more sugar) being reduced calorie ( but having very little nutrition content). People are making poor choices in part to misleading advertising from the food industry.

    That is not to say that individuals are not responsible for every choice they make, but I can see how one could think they were making healthy choices when they actually weren't. I remember a time when I thought choosing Ritz crackers over potato chips was a good choice when they can both be high calorie and are both basically just simple carbohydrates.

    I might be mixing up the various documentaries, but I believe the example in the movie is that some woman was choosing Lean Hot Pockets but not realizing that the amount they were consuming still had a bunch of calories or something? I'm sorry, but the fact it's called "lean" (which accurately reflects the fact that it's lower cal than regular hot pockets) doesn't mean that woman was tricked into thinking that it was a nutritious balanced meal. I really don't think the basics of nutrition are that hard, and the fact that it's basically vegetable free (there are some jalapeno ones, I guess) and it's white bread filled with cheese and a little bit of ham or whatever should make it not that hard to figure out.

    I don't find Hot Pockets appealing, but it's also possible to eat a healthy balanced diet that includes them. Basing your diet on them is precisely making a bad choice.

    :lol: I had a Pepperoni Pizza Lean Pocket with my dinner last night! :blush: But I also had chili beans and a yellow squash. Anyway, it fit in my calories, and the dinner as a whole filled me up quite nicely. And none of the foods I ate were special "health" foods, I shop in a small town Food Lion 95% of the time. I ate Lean Pockets, Oreos, and Toaster Strudels while I was losing and now that I'm maintaining. But I also ate veggies and beans and fibrous grains because I took a tiny little bit of initiative and learned what good stuff I wanted to include in my diet. I still sometimes eat one food because I think it's "better" than another, and sometimes I find out later that I was wrong. But as long as my calories are in line, so is my weight.

    My sister likes Hot Pockets (not sure what kind she eats, probably the lean ones), and eats them sometimes, and shockingly she also eats a pretty good overall diet and has never been overweight. (On the other hand, as mentioned, I do not like them, and don't eat most of the kinds of foods that Fed UP is on about, and yet I was obese at one point. Hmm.)

    The weight that I gained, only about 10lbs this time, about 19lbs the first time around) was all whole food, natural, non this and that blah blah.

    But I didn't know of that wondrous exercise routine known as the plate push aways and fork put me downs...:)

    And it's best to focus first on the plate push-aways, because a lot of foods (including Hot Pockets) require no fork :lol:

    lol, very true :)
  • FibroHikerFibroHiker Posts: 267Member Member Posts: 267Member Member
    steveko89 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    aidydh wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aidydh wrote: »
    It is not an epidemic, yet.

    https://coach.nine.com.au/latest/10-reasons-why-the-japanese-have-avoided-the-obesity-crisis/5ce477ce-f3be-4a4d-a1a9-da0ff4ee812c

    The documentary addresses the difference that maintenance of weight is not as simple as CICO. Various foods have different effects on the body. The documentary actually addresses how the food industry should be held responsible for the types of food they manufacture, sell, and the high number of overly processed foods on the market.

    Are other "healthier" food choices available to the populations the documentary addresses? If so, then you're suggesting that it's not the individuals responsibility to make better choices and to eat an amount that will keep them at a healthy weight?

    Cakes and pastries and candies of all sorts have been around for an awful long time, so I think it's a bit disingenuous to start blaming companies who decided to turn a profit on them.

    Fish and veggies or half a cheesecake? Not my fault if you choose the one that slingshots you over your maintenance calories.

    One of the overarching themes of the documentary is to point out that various people in the health and food industry often cite poor choices as a problem for obesity. The documentary attempts to show that may not be the case.

    How is it not the case?

    I had the same thought. Even if a choice has good intentions (i.e. eating/providing a "healthy" food per marketing or hearsay, focusing only on food quality and not quantity, etc.) it can still be a poor choice, or at the very least an uneducated one.

    Do we hold the food companies responsible for misleading infoy? Or, is it ultimately every single person's own failing for thinking the information they were given in terms of the healthfulness of the products they ate was accurate?
  • CSARdiverCSARdiver Posts: 6,084Member Member Posts: 6,084Member Member
    aidydh wrote: »
    steveko89 wrote: »
    lemurcat2 wrote: »
    aidydh wrote: »
    Phirrgus wrote: »
    aidydh wrote: »
    It is not an epidemic, yet.

    https://coach.nine.com.au/latest/10-reasons-why-the-japanese-have-avoided-the-obesity-crisis/5ce477ce-f3be-4a4d-a1a9-da0ff4ee812c

    The documentary addresses the difference that maintenance of weight is not as simple as CICO. Various foods have different effects on the body. The documentary actually addresses how the food industry should be held responsible for the types of food they manufacture, sell, and the high number of overly processed foods on the market.

    Are other "healthier" food choices available to the populations the documentary addresses? If so, then you're suggesting that it's not the individuals responsibility to make better choices and to eat an amount that will keep them at a healthy weight?

    Cakes and pastries and candies of all sorts have been around for an awful long time, so I think it's a bit disingenuous to start blaming companies who decided to turn a profit on them.

    Fish and veggies or half a cheesecake? Not my fault if you choose the one that slingshots you over your maintenance calories.

    One of the overarching themes of the documentary is to point out that various people in the health and food industry often cite poor choices as a problem for obesity. The documentary attempts to show that may not be the case.

    How is it not the case?

    I had the same thought. Even if a choice has good intentions (i.e. eating/providing a "healthy" food per marketing or hearsay, focusing only on food quality and not quantity, etc.) it can still be a poor choice, or at the very least an uneducated one.

    Do we hold the food companies responsible for misleading infoy? Or, is it ultimately every single person's own failing for thinking the information they were given in terms of the healthfulness of the products they ate was accurate?

    How is this misleading?

    The core issue is projection of a behavioral problem onto an inanimate object.

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