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Building glute muscle

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  • comptonelizabethcomptonelizabeth Posts: 1,679Member Member Posts: 1,679Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Are you restricted weight loaded training entirely?

    If so, why?

    Pretty much, yes. I have various conditions - severe degenerative disc disease, hip bursitis, osteoporosis in the lower spine and hip and was injuring myself frequently whenever I followed a lifting program, despite being very careful about warming up, correct form etc. I now find any kind of lifting is painful and s makes things worse, so the advice is to stop it altogether (though I might be able to resume at a later date) But I'm finding the loss of strength and muscle quite depressing!

    I see. I'd hazard more than likely the severe degenerative disc disease is at the top of concerns. The others would be more of a discover the proper volume/intensity/frequency that works best for you as a individual.

    May I ask what was the lifting program you were running? What was your experience with it for warm-ups to working sets? Was at any point any of the lifts tolerable where pain didn't get worse or perhaps better as the session continued?

    Initially I was doing strong lifts, it became unmanageable (even with frequent deloading) and not only made existing pain worse but caused new pain in shoulder, neck etc
    I switched to a bodyweight program for a while but even that was causing pain.

    Stronglifts isn't a great program as written. Being a LP and requiring excessive deloading that won't promote progress withIn that program as written is just a recipe for "wrong" unless the person is untrained. Though there are modifications that would make it okay for those who deal with chronic pain. Of course that also means it's no longer that program anymore so why not just find good programming.

    Pain is very complex and more details are needed.

    I would suggest a consult with either Dr. Derek Miles or Dr. Michael Ray over at Barbell Medicine. I believe they are capped at the moment but you can join the waiting list for a consult and one month programming.

    I would be more than happy to help you out otherwise but more info is needed and I don't believe MFP allows me to reach out to you in a way to obtain that info outside of the forums which isn't optimal for that purpose.
    Hey, thank you, I really appreciate your thoughts. I'm in the UK so that probably isn't possible - I'm assuming that's a US thing?
    I started the SL programme because it looked so simple. I did start to see good results but the pain wasn't worth it and, as I say, I now feel less mobile and strong than before I started lifting!
    Thank you for all the replies, I'm very grateful
    I think, as someone has said, that even though I have tried to follow correct form, it's likely that I haven't!
    I'm not someone who gives up easily and I've tried hard to persevere, but currently I'm in more pain and am less mobile than ever before. I have a couple of other chronic conditions, and long term use of meds such as steroids probably haven't helped.
    I am finally starting to feel a return of movement and flexibility - I think pilates and swimming have helped - and am really hoping I can eventually get back to lifting but at the moment it's out of the question. I just want to make sure I don't lose any more muscle, having worked so hard to build it, which is no mean feat in your 60s.
    Thanks for all the suggestions and I will look for a local physio who can advise me on form and suggest an individually tailored programme. I'm in the UK so physio is free on the NHS but in my experience they can only offer limited help because they are over stretched.

    Definitely ask your physio to help you with form -- they'll do it! I was shocked at how during my session today, we literally spent half of the time working on my squat and deadlift form, so that I could go home and do it, and improve my glute strength. I never would have thought physical therapy could do that!

    I can imagine! One thing my physio pointed out was that my feet were pronating (she looked at my dead lift form) so I think everything is out of whack. I'm hoping pilates will help that (it's a small class and the instructor is a trained physio)
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 7,838Member Member Posts: 7,838Member Member
    Hey, thank you, I really appreciate your thoughts. I'm in the UK so that probably isn't possible - I'm assuming that's a US thing?
    I started the SL programme because it looked so simple. I did start to see good results but the pain wasn't worth it and, as I say, I now feel less mobile and strong than before I started lifting!

    You can contact them via internet at the website I mentioned and at the very least be put on the waiting list. They are very smart doctors and are very knowledgeable on training. As a person who suffers with pain 24/7 I assure you that it is worth the time if you can continue to train in some compacity.

    SL is fine for a person who is untrained and just starting out(2-5 months). It isn't very good for long term training though being a LP and the volume is inappropriate with hardly any load management for optimal results.

    I wish you the best.

    edited August 1
  • 33gail3333gail33 Posts: 221Member Member Posts: 221Member Member
    Not sure why everyone is advising you to keep lifting when you specifically said you are looking for other things to do. I also have various issues including arthritis and personally would advise sticking to the medical advise of people who know your full history on that ( I work with my physio on what I can/can't do).
    Walking on an incline can help to tone glutes, as does running (if you can do that).
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 7,838Member Member Posts: 7,838Member Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    Not sure why everyone is advising you to keep lifting when you specifically said you are looking for other things to do. I also have various issues including arthritis and personally would advise sticking to the medical advise of people who know your full history on that ( I work with my physio on what I can/can't do).
    Walking on an incline can help to tone glutes, as does running (if you can do that).

    The majority is suggesting to seek medical advice with those who have a speciality in these issues so he/she can continue to lift and reap the benefits of resistance training. I don't believe I even read one person suggesting to continue lifting without medical advice of some sort.

    As mentioned previously, most doctors don't understand how to train or even the benefits of it unfortunately. 9/10 US doctors don't know the standard recommendation of resistance training and I believe only a small amount that do, actually advise it. This is a huge problem in the medical field.

    Case example when I was dx'd with a joint disease my doctor advised me to stop lifting heavy which put me in a wheel chair and/or cane in only a few months. My doctor was a runner, not a lifter. I returned to lifting heavy and I was back walking unassisted in a relatively short time.
    edited August 1
  • comptonelizabethcomptonelizabeth Posts: 1,679Member Member Posts: 1,679Member Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    Not sure why everyone is advising you to keep lifting when you specifically said you are looking for other things to do. I also have various issues including arthritis and personally would advise sticking to the medical advise of people who know your full history on that ( I work with my physio on what I can/can't do).
    Walking on an incline can help to tone glutes, as does running (if you can do that).

    Thank you, that's really helpful.
    To be fair I think the idea of not lifting is unthinkable for a lot of people. But yeah, it's currently off the agenda for me, at least for a while. By the way I also have arthritis, mainly in my hands, it does hinder progress!
  • comptonelizabethcomptonelizabeth Posts: 1,679Member Member Posts: 1,679Member Member
    Chieflrg wrote: »
    Hey, thank you, I really appreciate your thoughts. I'm in the UK so that probably isn't possible - I'm assuming that's a US thing?
    I started the SL programme because it looked so simple. I did start to see good results but the pain wasn't worth it and, as I say, I now feel less mobile and strong than before I started lifting!

    You can contact them via internet at the website I mentioned and at the very least be put on the waiting list. They are very smart doctors and are very knowledgeable on training. As a person who suffers with pain 24/7 I assure you that it is worth the time if you can continue to train in some compacity.

    SL is fine for a person who is untrained and just starting out(2-5 months). It isn't very good for long term training though being a LP and the volume is inappropriate with hardly any load management for optimal results.

    I wish you the best.

    Thank you :) Sorry to hear you also suffer pain - I wish you all the best, too!
    edited August 1
  • DancingMoosieDancingMoosie Posts: 4,387Member Member Posts: 4,387Member Member
    Maybe look into Miranda Esmonde-White? She has a show on PBS/klrn and does exercises for pain management, mobility, and strength in the form of what looks like a cross between ballet, pilates, and Tai chi.
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