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Any overcoming mental health illnesses success stories?

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  • try2againtry2again Posts: 3,409Member Member Posts: 3,409Member Member
    I like seeing posts like this where mental health needs are acknowledged and their role in our overall health and fitness are addressed. :)

    A close family member has recently been diagnosed with anxiety and social issues. I wonder if any of you would be willing to share how, specifically, therapy benefited you and what, if any, impact age had on your ability to address your issues? (Do you have to have a certain level of maturity to benefit from therapy?) Thank you in advance if any are willing to share. :)
  • RelCanonicalRelCanonical Posts: 3,036Member Member Posts: 3,036Member Member
    try2again wrote: »
    I like seeing posts like this where mental health needs are acknowledged and their role in our overall health and fitness are addressed. :)

    A close family member has recently been diagnosed with anxiety and social issues. I wonder if any of you would be willing to share how, specifically, therapy benefited you and what, if any, impact age had on your ability to address your issues? (Do you have to have a certain level of maturity to benefit from therapy?) Thank you in advance if any are willing to share. :)
    try2again wrote: »
    I like seeing posts like this where mental health needs are acknowledged and their role in our overall health and fitness are addressed. :)

    A close family member has recently been diagnosed with anxiety and social issues. I wonder if any of you would be willing to share how, specifically, therapy benefited you and what, if any, impact age had on your ability to address your issues? (Do you have to have a certain level of maturity to benefit from therapy?) Thank you in advance if any are willing to share. :)

    Therapy, for me, was an outlet to share all of stressors with my therapist that I felt embarrassed to talk about with others, and to get feedback on it. The important part about therapy was that it was NOT about whether the stress was warranted, or whether I was in the right or not, or whether my therapist could "relate" or not. Those kinds of things almost get in the way with normal conversation with a family member. Instead, we talked about why it made me upset, and what I could do to either realize that it wasn't worth stressing about, or minimize it by filling my life with healthy coping mechanisms. This is kind of the basis of cognitive behavioral therapy.

    I think the major important thing for therapy to work is that the person has to trust that the therapist is there to help them, they reflect on the conversation in therapy and try to apply it in real life, and that they can believe that it COULD work. They don't even have to think that it will, but give it enough of a chance that they believe it could.

    It took me a long, long time to start seeing the benefits from therapy, so having faith in the process is what got me to this point. Most times I would just spend venting and crying, and leaving feeling like nothing was accomplished. But in reality, I was putting all of these worries into words, and that really helped to put them in order in my brain, which made them much easier to deal with.

    I think the toughest thing with maturity level is I don't think therapy works if you MAKE someone go. I think making them go the first time is alright, so they get a feel for it, but after that, making someone go if they don't want to is just throwing effort away. Also, finding the right therapist is so important. They are not just administering a treatment, so their "bedside manner" and how they "click" with the patient is super important. I got lucky, I found a therapist through a referral from a friend who I clicked with, so the therapist and I were kind of on the same wavelength because he had worked so well for my friend as well. It's not always this easy. I had tried a different therapist when my current one was on vacation, and it turned out HORRIBLY.

    I guess, in short, tl;dr, I don't think maturity level is necessarily a barrier to it working, but a less mature person may be less likely to be willing to let it work, and that's an important component to it actually working. Also, switch therapists immediately if not happy - my therapist only made me promise one thing, and that was if I wasn't happy with him, to find a new therapist, but to not quit therapy.
  • 1234Yuki1234Yuki Posts: 18Member Member Posts: 18Member Member
    try2again wrote: »
    I like seeing posts like this where mental health needs are acknowledged and their role in our overall health and fitness are addressed. :)

    A close family member has recently been diagnosed with anxiety and social issues. I wonder if any of you would be willing to share how, specifically, therapy benefited you and what, if any, impact age had on your ability to address your issues? (Do you have to have a certain level of maturity to benefit from therapy?) Thank you in advance if any are willing to share. :)
    try2again wrote: »
    I like seeing posts like this where mental health needs are acknowledged and their role in our overall health and fitness are addressed. :)

    A close family member has recently been diagnosed with anxiety and social issues. I wonder if any of you would be willing to share how, specifically, therapy benefited you and what, if any, impact age had on your ability to address your issues? (Do you have to have a certain level of maturity to benefit from therapy?) Thank you in advance if any are willing to share. :)

    Therapy, for me, was an outlet to share all of stressors with my therapist that I felt embarrassed to talk about with others, and to get feedback on it. The important part about therapy was that it was NOT about whether the stress was warranted, or whether I was in the right or not, or whether my therapist could "relate" or not. Those kinds of things almost get in the way with normal conversation with a family member. Instead, we talked about why it made me upset, and what I could do to either realize that it wasn't worth stressing about, or minimize it by filling my life with healthy coping mechanisms. This is kind of the basis of cognitive behavioral therapy.

    I think the major important thing for therapy to work is that the person has to trust that the therapist is there to help them, they reflect on the conversation in therapy and try to apply it in real life, and that they can believe that it COULD work. They don't even have to think that it will, but give it enough of a chance that they believe it could.

    It took me a long, long time to start seeing the benefits from therapy, so having faith in the process is what got me to this point. Most times I would just spend venting and crying, and leaving feeling like nothing was accomplished. But in reality, I was putting all of these worries into words, and that really helped to put them in order in my brain, which made them much easier to deal with.

    I think the toughest thing with maturity level is I don't think therapy works if you MAKE someone go. I think making them go the first time is alright, so they get a feel for it, but after that, making someone go if they don't want to is just throwing effort away. Also, finding the right therapist is so important. They are not just administering a treatment, so their "bedside manner" and how they "click" with the patient is super important. I got lucky, I found a therapist through a referral from a friend who I clicked with, so the therapist and I were kind of on the same wavelength because he had worked so well for my friend as well. It's not always this easy. I had tried a different therapist when my current one was on vacation, and it turned out HORRIBLY.

    I guess, in short, tl;dr, I don't think maturity level is necessarily a barrier to it working, but a less mature person may be less likely to be willing to let it work, and that's an important component to it actually working. Also, switch therapists immediately if not happy - my therapist only made me promise one thing, and that was if I wasn't happy with him, to find a new therapist, but to not quit therapy.
    try2again wrote: »
    I like seeing posts like this where mental health needs are acknowledged and their role in our overall health and fitness are addressed. :)

    A close family member has recently been diagnosed with anxiety and social issues. I wonder if any of you would be willing to share how, specifically, therapy benefited you and what, if any, impact age had on your ability to address your issues? (Do you have to have a certain level of maturity to benefit from therapy?) Thank you in advance if any are willing to share. :)

    Try2Again- as I get older, the more I appreciate therapy and am able to understand my needs with my social anxiety. Therapy has been a real God send for me. I agree with RelCanonical, though. It’s sooo crucial to find a therapist that you click with. I’ve had countless therapists that I didn’t mesh with but I am so aware of how important my mental health is that I kept searching until I found one that worked. I’ve been in group therapies such as DBT and intensive outpatient therapy and both were sooo absolutely wonderful & have helped me tremendously. I definitely still struggle but therapy has helped me in some of my darkest times know that I’m not alone and that there is hope.
  • 1234Yuki1234Yuki Posts: 18Member Member Posts: 18Member Member
    This is one of my most passionate topics as it's has affected my life in a deep way. Genetics and druggie parents and poverty make a real interesting dynamic to one's life. Abuse of all accounts also in the mix make for several attempts at ending my life, not being able to connect with proper people only the undesirables who see you as a ploy to use, and racism that plagues as I was never really heard by doctors or teachers or anyone willing to save me or help me truly. So now at 33 going 34 being on 9 years from my last attempt at ending my life I can say you may never overcome such as you are prone so that is always there like addiction, but you can find ways to cope and make the best of your existence.

    The older I get the more I look into the maladaptive ways I have developed and some were purely as a way to survive ie being overly generous, trying to be a save a ho, not allowing myself to heal and need to be validated and saved. I look over my life right now and I'm mad, sad and disgusted. I look back to the girl who at 9 was sexually assaulted by a family member, abused at home by her parents and belittled and bullied by kids and school administrators because of my acting out and fat/dark skin existence. I constantly am consuming content on how to become wealthy, how to start a business and actually live a good life. I feel dumb and out of place most of the time and soo basic because of how I allowed the issues of depression/anxiety and possibly being on the spectrum which they didn't test back in the day on girls or people of color for a host of reasons. My brother has that and more but I felt so ill-equipped to deal with the world. I'm single have been for 10+ years and feel old and underdeveloped. I have done a lot of things to survive that would make most gasp.

    One thing I know those who have some sort of mental illness or disorder if used properly can help them flourish and be great. It's fascinating to see how the mind's perception shapes the world and causes issues from another perception aren't there. All one can do is be aware and know what ways in a healthy manner to cope.

    You are an absolute warrior and hero in my eyes. I am amazed, truly. You’ve dealt with so much & my heart aches for the pain you’ve been through. Thank you sooo much for sharing. I am sooo sorry for the bad experiences you’ve had. I definitely agree that you never really overcome mental illnesses, you just learn to cope with them. “All one can do is be aware and know what ways in a healthy manner to cope.” - I agree with what you said there completely. Learning how to cope & ride the waves of life is sooo crucial. Thank you again for sharing 💖💖💖💕
  • NewLIFEstyle4MENewLIFEstyle4ME Posts: 4,028Member Member Posts: 4,028Member Member
    Dearest:
    zyxst wrote: »
    In short, I was finally diagnosed in Canada with major depressive disorder and social anxiety. Was able to get on a cover-all medication (Venlafaxine).

    Trying to get help is a major PITA, especially in a country with socialized medicine. Oh, you have suicidal thoughts and self-harm? Since you're functional (aka not sterotypical depressed/suicidal person), you get to wait 10 months. The 10 month wait was that "short" because I called the mental health clinic I was referred to and told them to take me off the waiting list since they don't believe that I'm in "danger". A couple days later, oh shock and surprise we've got a cancellation and can fit you in (yeah, in late December near Xmas, the height of depression season) :roll eyes:

    The medication merely dulls my depressive and anxious thoughts. I still have MDD and SA. They will never go aaway or be fixed. My brain chemistry is broken and the Venlafaxine is the duct tape.

    AND
    This is one of my most passionate topics as it's has affected my life in a deep way. Genetics and druggie parents and poverty make a real interesting dynamic to one's life. Abuse of all accounts also in the mix make for several attempts at ending my life, not being able to connect with proper people only the undesirables who see you as a ploy to use, and racism that plagues as I was never really heard by doctors or teachers or anyone willing to save me or help me truly. So now at 33 going 34 being on 9 years from my last attempt at ending my life I can say you may never overcome such as you are prone so that is always there like addiction, but you can find ways to cope and make the best of your existence.

    The older I get the more I look into the maladaptive ways I have developed and some were purely as a way to survive ie being overly generous, trying to be a save a ho, not allowing myself to heal and need to be validated and saved. I look over my life right now and I'm mad, sad and disgusted. I look back to the girl who at 9 was sexually assaulted by a family member, abused at home by her parents and belittled and bullied by kids and school administrators because of my acting out and fat/dark skin existence. I constantly am consuming content on how to become wealthy, how to start a business and actually live a good life. I feel dumb and out of place most of the time and soo basic because of how I allowed the issues of depression/anxiety and possibly being on the spectrum which they didn't test back in the day on girls or people of color for a host of reasons. My brother has that and more but I felt so ill-equipped to deal with the world. I'm single have been for 10+ years and feel old and underdeveloped. I have done a lot of things to survive that would make most gasp.

    One thing I know those who have some sort of mental illness or disorder if used properly can help them flourish and be great. It's fascinating to see how the mind's perception shapes the world and causes issues from another perception aren't there. All one can do is be aware and know what ways in a healthy manner to cope.


    tumblr_pgnsi2iMb81uxie7m_540.gif
    edited September 8
  • middlehaitchmiddlehaitch Posts: 8,141Member Member Posts: 8,141Member Member
    @zyxst, I know there is nothing I can say or do to change your life, and the world doesn’t revolve around MFP, but I am so happy to see that you are still here.

    I think of you frequently, we have both been here so long, and care.

    Cheers, h.
  • NewLIFEstyle4MENewLIFEstyle4ME Posts: 4,028Member Member Posts: 4,028Member Member
    I'm not ready to post but I will. Meanwhile....thank you...I'm typing through tears knowing maybe I can express my issues finally.

    {{{{ <3 HUGS <3 }}}}}} Thank you so much for posting...no matter how much it feels like no one understands and/or you're alone--you're NOT! There are more people than we can ever dare count (right here on Mfp and all over the world) that are DAILY suffering with all kinds of mental issues and major serious troubles and woe and so VERY many--YOU ARE NOT ALONE.
    tenor.gif
  • 1234Yuki1234Yuki Posts: 18Member Member Posts: 18Member Member
    I'm not ready to post but I will. Meanwhile....thank you...I'm typing through tears knowing maybe I can express my issues finally.

    {{{{ <3 HUGS <3 }}}}}} Thank you so much for posting...no matter how much it feels like no one understands and/or you're alone--you're NOT! There are more people than we can ever dare count (right here on Mfp and all over the world) that are DAILY suffering with all kinds of mental issues and major serious troubles and woe and so VERY many--YOU ARE NOT ALONE.
    tenor.gif

    This 🙌🙌🙌💖💖💖💫💫💫
  • 1234Yuki1234Yuki Posts: 18Member Member Posts: 18Member Member
    huddleup wrote: »
    Reading all of these posts touched me. I do realize I'm not alone in this, but mental health issues still have such a stigma attached to them. I was diagnosed with bi-polar about 23 years ago. It started in my teens and went undiagnosed until I was 30, even after seeing many therapists. I agree with others, finding the right therapist is essential.

    Life was hard for me and everyone around me before I was diagnosed. I went from suicidal depression to fits of rage to bouncing off the walls in happiness. After seeing a doctor that recognized what was going on, I was able to get on medication. It has made a world of difference. I'm at a even keel now. The only downfall is I don't have a range of emotions. I don't feel happy or sad in any extreme. I miss the happy times. Now when I should be really happy I just feel a sense of Joy, but it beats dealing with uncontrollable emotions. My creativity and spontaneity is also gone. It is something I have to work on with focus. But again it is worth it.

    I don't do therapy now. I rely a lot on my faith and those around me that understand and encourage me. If I didn't have Jesus Christ in my life, even with the medication, I would be a lost cause. He's my strength.

    I pray that someone is as encouraged by my words and I have been by others.

    I’m sooo glad you were able to find the help you needed. I totally understand the limitations medications can give you. I’m also glad to hear your faith has helped you sooo much!! Finding the right coping mechanisms can be life changing!! 💖🌟✨💕💝💝💝
  • iguttigutt Posts: 57Member Member Posts: 57Member Member
    Buddy you seem like you need to learn the art of not giving a f***. Usually it’s bad to be so carefree that you don’t give a f*** but in your case it seems necessary to do that for a bit so i challenge you to go outside alone and go buy something from the store and go back home without overthinking. I would like to hear back from you honestly

    @1234Yuki
    edited September 9
  • Emmapatterson1729Emmapatterson1729 Posts: 1,302Member Member Posts: 1,302Member Member
    Too late to edit.... But at one point, I used to bawl if I was forced to go out.

    I felt too hideous to leave the house. Even to go to the grocery store, which was a necessity... Internet back then was nothing like today, I would literally cry and have to be coaxed out of the house.

    I overcame most of my fears and insecurities. I get more intimidated on here than at the store now.

  • NewLIFEstyle4MENewLIFEstyle4ME Posts: 4,028Member Member Posts: 4,028Member Member
    huddleup wrote: »
    Reading all of these posts touched me. I do realize I'm not alone in this, but mental health issues still have such a stigma attached to them. I was diagnosed with bi-polar about 23 years ago. It started in my teens and went undiagnosed until I was 30, even after seeing many therapists. I agree with others, finding the right therapist is essential.

    Life was hard for me and everyone around me before I was diagnosed. I went from suicidal depression to fits of rage to bouncing off the walls in happiness. After seeing a doctor that recognized what was going on, I was able to get on medication. It has made a world of difference. I'm at a even keel now. The only downfall is I don't have a range of emotions. I don't feel happy or sad in any extreme. I miss the happy times. Now when I should be really happy I just feel a sense of Joy, but it beats dealing with uncontrollable emotions. My creativity and spontaneity is also gone. It is something I have to work on with focus. But again it is worth it.

    I don't do therapy now. I rely a lot on my faith and those around me that understand and encourage me. If I didn't have Jesus Christ in my life, even with the medication, I would be a lost cause. He's my strength.

    I pray that someone is as encouraged by my words and I have been by others.

    Wow...your post blessed me tremendously--THANK YOU ever so very much!!! o:) <3 o:)

    I can relate to OP.

    I wasn't just bullied by peers, but also by teacher's and would go home (a place where most kids found to be a safe sanctuary) just to be bullied by parents.

    People would always say, "Get over it!"

    I read a book called "Feeling Good" by Dr Burns.

    It changed the way I thought when out or dealing with people. I still have trust issues, but I feel strong and not like a victim any longer. I can now recognize toxicity and can now surround myself with positive, supportive people who build me up and know my worth.

    I read a couple of other cognitive behavioral therapy books.

    They all really helped. I can go out shopping anywhere, and not feel like everyone is watching me, mocking me, or out to get me.

    I know right?!?, "get over it"--that's nothing less than "interesting/thought provoking-curious/indifferent to me... I read that book many years ago and it is a super terrific book!
    edited September 10
  • 1234Yuki1234Yuki Posts: 18Member Member Posts: 18Member Member
    Too late to edit.... But at one point, I used to bawl if I was forced to go out.

    I felt too hideous to leave the house. Even to go to the grocery store, which was a necessity... Internet back then was nothing like today, I would literally cry and have to be coaxed out of the house.

    I overcame most of my fears and insecurities. I get more intimidated on here than at the store now.


    I am sooo proud of you. Truly. Your story gives me sooo much hope & peace 💖💖💖💖💕
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