Calorie Counter

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Calories in vs out

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  • Khartman6Khartman6 Posts: 27Member Member Posts: 27Member Member
    WinoGelato wrote: »
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.

    Why are carbs to be avoided later in the day? What do you think happens it you consume them? And what’s magical about protein before bed if you are lifting?
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.

    I don't often reply here often but this just sort of needed addressed.

    I do agree that a food scale is an invaluable tool if you are trying to as accurate as possible with CI. For example when I started out I was eating 3/4 cup of fruitloops as that is what the side panel said a serving was...then I purchased my food scale...and guess what 125grams (serving size in weight) is a lot more than 3/4 of a cup...same with cottage cheese...however 1tbsp of peanut butter is a lot more than the gram servings...

    The type of exercise you are doing is irrelevant because gaining muscle mass is not that simple...sure that are cases where this might be true but they are not the general rule.

    When you weigh yourself is a purely subjective thing. Some people like to see the trending...so they do it everyday.

    As for the scale, it has to rule when dieting as the facts are this...if you are trying to lose 10lbs that is how you know you are losing and when you are done...

    People can look in the mirror all they want and see what they see but it doesn't mean it's reality. I at 215lbs looked in the mirror and didn't think it was that bad...it was. The scale is the reality of life as far as weight goes for "dieting".

    Eating late is irrelevant for CI/CO, carbs after 6 or protein before bed is irrelevant. Seems like the a lot of fitness industry not so true things have filtered into your thinking....most of which don't matter and have been proven time and time again not to matter.

    Have a read:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6415027/

    As far as late night carbs, I should have been more specific. There may not be a problem with complex carbs later in the day when trying to lose weight. Problem is nobody really knows for sure, there's a lot of opinions, but not enough research has been done on the subject. A Google search will result in support either way. I wouldn't touch higher glycemic foods close to bed time on a cut though.

    The point I was trying to make with the scale is, a lot of people starting out get obsessed with weighing themselves. Often times this leads to frustration and giving up. Weight changes all day long, and from day to day based on so many different variables. By checking your weight once a week, on the same day and same time, you get a more accurate gauge of true weight gain or loss, as opposed to checking it when ever is convenient. At 215 you may not have thought you looked that big, but at 195 I'm betting you noticed visible changes in your body.
    edited January 22
  • magnusthenerdmagnusthenerd Posts: 1,106Member Member Posts: 1,106Member Member
    Interesting, I was just listening to Iron Culture podcast's most recent with Danny Lennon, discussing chrononutrition.
    None of it violates CICO. There might be benefits to avoiding anything besides protein a few hours before bed. More so in how it will impact appetite and glucose regulation.
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    WinoGelato wrote: »
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.

    Why are carbs to be avoided later in the day? What do you think happens it you consume them? And what’s magical about protein before bed if you are lifting?
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.

    I don't often reply here often but this just sort of needed addressed.

    I do agree that a food scale is an invaluable tool if you are trying to as accurate as possible with CI. For example when I started out I was eating 3/4 cup of fruitloops as that is what the side panel said a serving was...then I purchased my food scale...and guess what 125grams (serving size in weight) is a lot more than 3/4 of a cup...same with cottage cheese...however 1tbsp of peanut butter is a lot more than the gram servings...

    The type of exercise you are doing is irrelevant because gaining muscle mass is not that simple...sure that are cases where this might be true but they are not the general rule.

    When you weigh yourself is a purely subjective thing. Some people like to see the trending...so they do it everyday.

    As for the scale, it has to rule when dieting as the facts are this...if you are trying to lose 10lbs that is how you know you are losing and when you are done...

    People can look in the mirror all they want and see what they see but it doesn't mean it's reality. I at 215lbs looked in the mirror and didn't think it was that bad...it was. The scale is the reality of life as far as weight goes for "dieting".

    Eating late is irrelevant for CI/CO, carbs after 6 or protein before bed is irrelevant. Seems like the a lot of fitness industry not so true things have filtered into your thinking....most of which don't matter and have been proven time and time again not to matter.

    The point I was trying to make with the scale is, a lot of people starting out get obsessed with weighing themselves. Often times this leads to frustration and giving up. Weight changes all day long, and from day to day based on so many different variables. By checking your weight once a week, on the same day and same time, you get a more accurate gauge of true weight gain or loss, as opposed to checking it when ever is convenient. At 215 you may not have thought you looked that big, but at 195 I'm betting you noticed visible changes in your body.

    Or... it is possible to use a rolling average by logging daily with an app and weighing oneself under the same conditions, time of day wise.
  • wmd1979wmd1979 Posts: 442Member Member Posts: 442Member Member
    Interesting, I was just listening to Iron Culture podcast's most recent with Danny Lennon, discussing chrononutrition.
    None of it violates CICO. There might be benefits to avoiding anything besides protein a few hours before bed. More so in how it will impact appetite and glucose regulation.
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    WinoGelato wrote: »
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.

    Why are carbs to be avoided later in the day? What do you think happens it you consume them? And what’s magical about protein before bed if you are lifting?
    SezxyStef wrote: »
    Khartman6 wrote: »
    No tracker is a hundred percent. It can't be, it doesn't know your body composition, or true fitness level. I'd start by making sure the portions you are entering are what you're actually eating. A food scale is a must if you're just starting out. 2nd, what type of exercises are you doing? Could it be you're gaining muscle mass? When do you weigh yourself? It should always be the same day and time, and only once a week. Also, don't allow the scale to rule your decision on dieting, use it to track progress, but base your decisions by what you see in the mirror. If after a month you don't see any progress on the scale, and in the mirror then change something. As far as eating late, it depends on your goals. Carbs, other then vegetables, should always be avoided later in the day. If your lifting and looking to gain muscle mass, you should always have protein before bed.

    I don't often reply here often but this just sort of needed addressed.

    I do agree that a food scale is an invaluable tool if you are trying to as accurate as possible with CI. For example when I started out I was eating 3/4 cup of fruitloops as that is what the side panel said a serving was...then I purchased my food scale...and guess what 125grams (serving size in weight) is a lot more than 3/4 of a cup...same with cottage cheese...however 1tbsp of peanut butter is a lot more than the gram servings...

    The type of exercise you are doing is irrelevant because gaining muscle mass is not that simple...sure that are cases where this might be true but they are not the general rule.

    When you weigh yourself is a purely subjective thing. Some people like to see the trending...so they do it everyday.

    As for the scale, it has to rule when dieting as the facts are this...if you are trying to lose 10lbs that is how you know you are losing and when you are done...

    People can look in the mirror all they want and see what they see but it doesn't mean it's reality. I at 215lbs looked in the mirror and didn't think it was that bad...it was. The scale is the reality of life as far as weight goes for "dieting".

    Eating late is irrelevant for CI/CO, carbs after 6 or protein before bed is irrelevant. Seems like the a lot of fitness industry not so true things have filtered into your thinking....most of which don't matter and have been proven time and time again not to matter.

    The point I was trying to make with the scale is, a lot of people starting out get obsessed with weighing themselves. Often times this leads to frustration and giving up. Weight changes all day long, and from day to day based on so many different variables. By checking your weight once a week, on the same day and same time, you get a more accurate gauge of true weight gain or loss, as opposed to checking it when ever is convenient. At 215 you may not have thought you looked that big, but at 195 I'm betting you noticed visible changes in your body.

    Or... it is possible to use a rolling average by logging daily with an app and weighing oneself under the same conditions, time of day wise.

    Exactly. Having more data points to compare is going to paint the most accurate picture. I could very easily weigh the same thing today as I do the same day next week, but because of fluctuations, its the trend that matters and not a single data point(or two).
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Posts: 6,534Member Member Posts: 6,534Member Member
    Now that just ruins my day :( And they don't list that calorie information on the bag - I had never noticed the fine print until you told me this, but there is a small statement at the very bottom that says "free food up to 8 teaspoons" and "in some recipes, Splenda no calorie sweetener may contribute minimal calories"

    When I'm trying to make every calorie count, that is not news I want to hear!

    I wish Swerve wasn't so darned expensive; it baked well like Splenda does. I don't like using the stevia alternatives as they just don't seem to sweeten well in baked goods, and my luck, they'd be like splenda and add unknown and unwanted calories, too, in large quantities.

    Sorry <hug>!

    There is almost nothing that is truly zero calories in sufficient quantities.

    Even fiber often counted as zero calories in nutritional information, if you dig deeper you discover that sometimes the type of fiber in question does get partially absorbed on the way out and might still be contributing 0.5 to 2.5 Cal per gram.

    Due to how little you need to use for the sweetness level it imparts (and due to the bulking medium being water) liquid Splenda (which I found once at my local Safeway and have been looking for it since) probably has the least amount of actual calories. But you would have to substitute the sugar "bulk" with something else which would still have some calories :smile: When you solve the problem of WHAT.... let me know... I am still failing to find a way after trying apple sauce, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, carrots, unsweetened cocoa... and who knows what else! :wink:

    UK/European entries often have 100g values where you see the true(er) calories once you go beyond the magical less than 5 Calories for a 0.33 of a microsecond spray... therefore it has no calories! Or USDA entries... looking at you yellow mustard and baking powder :angry:
  • PAV8888PAV8888 Posts: 6,534Member Member Posts: 6,534Member Member
    as to people trying to figure out their weight trend, assuming that they can mentally deal with it, there is little doubt that having more similar condition daily observations will lead to a more accurate mapping of a trend.

    week to week fluctuations can still be caused by the same issues that cause day to day fluctuations and so can month to month ones.
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