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Metric System

randyzweinsteinrandyzweinstein Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
Hey myfitnesspal. The entire planet uses metric. I went to chef school in France, Canada and Morocco, it's all metric. I have no idea what an ounce is, or a cup, or whatever folk measurements you are using. Every home has a scale and every container in the world (except the USA?) has the amount of food measured in metric by weight or volume. If I am trying to measure the yoghurt I'm eating in the morning, I can look and see that i've eaten 1/3 of the 750 ml container, so 250 ml. Or I can throw it on the scale and measure that I ate 270 g. Now when I go to enter the food, I am presented with a million confusing serving types in an array of measurements that make no sense outside of the USA, and metric is often not an option. The serving sizes are not helpful when there is metric, it just adds extra math. I often have to make a bizarro choice like 0.8 servings of 300 ml of yoghurt, or 250 servings of 1 g of yoghurt. Just let me enter 250 g and be done with it. 250 servings of 1 gram is REALLY bad UX. On top of that, for unlisted foods there is a nutritional info box for carbs, protein, vitamin a etc, and it's all in metric as well. No way I am doing the math to enter this in. This app is unusable to me.

Replies

  • cmriversidecmriverside Posts: 28,965Member Member Posts: 28,965Member Member
    There are entries with "your" type measurements, you just have to find them. They were entered by the admin of this site. They will give both imperial and metric measurements in the portion drop-down box. I use mostly metric with my foods.

    Alternately if you don't want to search for them you can enter your own food entries into the database and then they are the way you want them in your MY FOODS list. The main database takes some time to figure out. I did a lot of conversions in the beginning - and I'm in the U.S.

    You could also make your own website...or find one that's easier to use.
    edited November 30
  • maureenkhildemaureenkhilde Posts: 698Member Member Posts: 698Member Member
    Hey myfitnesspal. The entire planet uses metric. I went to chef school in France, Canada and Morocco, it's all metric. I have no idea what an ounce is, or a cup, or whatever folk measurements you are using. Every home has a scale and every container in the world (except the USA?) has the amount of food measured in metric by weight or volume. If I am trying to measure the yoghurt I'm eating in the morning, I can look and see that i've eaten 1/3 of the 750 ml container, so 250 ml. Or I can throw it on the scale and measure that I ate 270 g. Now when I go to enter the food, I am presented with a million confusing serving types in an array of measurements that make no sense outside of the USA, and metric is often not an option. The serving sizes are not helpful when there is metric, it just adds extra math. I often have to make a bizarro choice like 0.8 servings of 300 ml of yoghurt, or 250 servings of 1 g of yoghurt. Just let me enter 250 g and be done with it. 250 servings of 1 gram is REALLY bad UX. On top of that, for unlisted foods there is a nutritional info box for carbs, protein, vitamin a etc, and it's all in metric as well. No way I am doing the math to enter this in. This app is unusable to me.

    I must admit I find it odd to read someone state they cannot figure out what an ounce, or cup is. Yes I am born and raised in the USA. And no I did not go to chef school in three different countries. But I most certainly know how to convert foods to all measurements that are used in weighing and measuring foods, both solids and liquids.
    Realizing that MFP is worldwide, we all have to somewhat compromise and adjust. And if you really cannot do that, then yes you will need to find another site.
  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 3,354Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,354Member, Premium Member
    Hey myfitnesspal. The entire planet uses metric. I went to chef school in France, Canada and Morocco, it's all metric. I have no idea what an ounce is, or a cup, or whatever folk measurements you are using. Every home has a scale and every container in the world (except the USA?) has the amount of food measured in metric by weight or volume. If I am trying to measure the yoghurt I'm eating in the morning, I can look and see that i've eaten 1/3 of the 750 ml container, so 250 ml. Or I can throw it on the scale and measure that I ate 270 g. Now when I go to enter the food, I am presented with a million confusing serving types in an array of measurements that make no sense outside of the USA, and metric is often not an option. The serving sizes are not helpful when there is metric, it just adds extra math. I often have to make a bizarro choice like 0.8 servings of 300 ml of yoghurt, or 250 servings of 1 g of yoghurt. Just let me enter 250 g and be done with it. 250 servings of 1 gram is REALLY bad UX. On top of that, for unlisted foods there is a nutritional info box for carbs, protein, vitamin a etc, and it's all in metric as well. No way I am doing the math to enter this in. This app is unusable to me.

    The nutritional database entries are entered in the measurement method that the person who created the database used. That is normally based off of either the nutritional label or the USDA database. Most of the users are in the US, so most of the entries are US measurements. But there arne plenty in grams and ML and other metric measurements. It's not hard to find them.

    That's cool that you went to chef school in three countries, but it's too bad they didn't include a basic math class in them. It's pretty easy to convert from metric to imperial and vice versa. An ounce is 28 grams. A cup is 240 ml. I live in a country that interchanges metric and imperial, so I am frequently changing between them. If doing math on the fly is not your thing, you can literally thing 152g to ounces in Google and it will give you an automatic conversion. It only takes a second. A lot less time than writing an angry/snarky post.
  • GummiMundiGummiMundi Posts: 89Member Member Posts: 89Member Member
    I, too, am European. I, too, have no idea what cups or ounces are (from a practical point of view). And yet, mysteriously, I have been able to successfully use this website for over a year, every day.
    Go figure. ;)
  • mangrothianmangrothian Posts: 1,351Member Member Posts: 1,351Member Member
    MikePTY wrote: »
    Hey myfitnesspal. The entire planet uses metric. I went to chef school in France, Canada and Morocco, it's all metric. I have no idea what an ounce is, or a cup, or whatever folk measurements you are using. Every home has a scale and every container in the world (except the USA?) has the amount of food measured in metric by weight or volume. If I am trying to measure the yoghurt I'm eating in the morning, I can look and see that i've eaten 1/3 of the 750 ml container, so 250 ml. Or I can throw it on the scale and measure that I ate 270 g. Now when I go to enter the food, I am presented with a million confusing serving types in an array of measurements that make no sense outside of the USA, and metric is often not an option. The serving sizes are not helpful when there is metric, it just adds extra math. I often have to make a bizarro choice like 0.8 servings of 300 ml of yoghurt, or 250 servings of 1 g of yoghurt. Just let me enter 250 g and be done with it. 250 servings of 1 gram is REALLY bad UX. On top of that, for unlisted foods there is a nutritional info box for carbs, protein, vitamin a etc, and it's all in metric as well. No way I am doing the math to enter this in. This app is unusable to me.

    The nutritional database entries are entered in the measurement method that the person who created the database used. That is normally based off of either the nutritional label or the USDA database. Most of the users are in the US, so most of the entries are US measurements. But there arne plenty in grams and ML and other metric measurements. It's not hard to find them.

    That's cool that you went to chef school in three countries, but it's too bad they didn't include a basic math class in them. It's pretty easy to convert from metric to imperial and vice versa. An ounce is 28 grams. A cup is 240 ml. I live in a country that interchanges metric and imperial, so I am frequently changing between them. If doing math on the fly is not your thing, you can literally thing 152g to ounces in Google and it will give you an automatic conversion. It only takes a second. A lot less time than writing an angry/snarky post.

    That's where the other issue lies. There are metric cups (250ml) and US cups (240ml). I believe the tablespoon sizes are different as well (20ml vs 15 ml). Might not mean much over one entry, but if you're using one and logging the other over the long haul I guess it could make a difference.

    To solve weight issues though, I just got myself a digital scale that will convert to all weight types. I guess hard is dependent on the amount of effort one is willing to commit.
  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 3,354Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,354Member, Premium Member
    GummiMundi wrote: »
    I, too, am European. I, too, have no idea what cups or ounces are (from a practical point of view). And yet, mysteriously, I have been able to successfully use this website for over a year, every day.
    Go figure. ;)

    I mean to be fair, almost nobody, American or not, knows what a "cup" really is.
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