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Fast Weight Loss

jm_1234jm_1234 Posts: 54Member Member Posts: 54Member Member
Thoughts? Should we reconsider the normal advice to lose 1-2 lbs per week?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3780395/
Conclusion: Collectively, findings indicate both short- and long-term advantages to fast initial weight loss. Fast weight losers obtained greater weight reduction and long-term maintenance, and were not more susceptible to weight regain than gradual weight losers.

https://www.jillianmichaels.com/blog/weight-loss/myth-if-you-lose-weight-too-fast-you-wont-keep-it
A recent study from the University of Florida revealed that losing weight quickly in the early stages of a weight-loss program may be more beneficial, over the long term, both for losing the weight and keeping it off. The researchers found that those who lost weight quickly were five times more likely to achieve clinically significant weight loss in 18 months than those who lost weight at a slower rate.

Replies

  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 5,971Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,971Member, Premium Member
    18 months of results is hardly long term. How many of the participants were even at goal and really maintaining in that amount of time?

    It is not a big surprise that people who are trying to lose faster actually lose faster than those that don't. It is also not a big surprise that people who lose faster may have greater motivation. The question is what happens when you just have to live a normal life and there is no scale motivating you to eat the right amount and move more?

    In my opinion managing my weight for the next 30 years without any motivation is what I need to accomplish. This happens through habit change. I have bad habits I have had for decades to replace with new ones. For me this is not a quick change so I would rather not race to a goal because I am not ready to be there yet. I have seen a few people here state they were able to change instantly so I suppose it is possible but I am not sure how many have maintained for 3 or more years.
  • puffbratpuffbrat Posts: 2,493Member Member Posts: 2,493Member Member
    Method: "Groups were drawn from participants in the TOURS trial, which included a sample of middle-aged (mean =59.3 years) obese women (mean BMI =36.8) who received a 6-month lifestyle intervention followed by a 1-year extended care program. Participants were encouraged to reduce caloric intake to achieve weight losses of 0.45 kg/ week. Groups were categorized as “FAST” (≥0.68 kg/week, n=69), “MODERATE” (≥0.23 and <0.68 kg/week, n= 104), and “SLOW” (<0.23 kg/week, n=89) based on rate of weight loss during first month of treatment."

    Result: "At 18 months, 50.7% of participants in the FAST group, 35.6% of participants in the MODERATE group, and 16.9% of participants in the SLOW group maintained a clinically significant 10% reduction in body weight."

    Discussion: "There were three key findings with regards to weight outcomes. First, women who lost weight at a FAST rate during the first 4 weeks of treatment achieved significantly greater weight reductions at 6 months than those who lost at MODERATE and SLOW rates, and those who lost at a MODERATE rate during the first 4 weeks of treatment lost significantly more weight than those who lost at a SLOW rate. At 18 months, the FAST group maintained a significantly greater weight loss than the SLOW group. These findings are consistent with previous research demonstrating that larger initial weight losses are associated with greater long-term weight loss success [10, 12–15, 21, 30].

    Second, no significant differences between groups were observed in terms of weight regain. Contrary to previous research [15, 17], participants in the present study who lost at a greater initial rate did not experience greater amounts of weight regain post-treatment than those who lost at a slower initial rate.

    Third, the FAST and MODERATE group were 5.1 and 2.7 times, respectively, more likely to achieve successful and beneficial weight loss maintenance of 10% body weight reduction at 18-months follow-up than the SLOW group. Only 16.9% of the SLOW group attained this successful 10% weight loss in the year following active behavioral treatment compared to 35.6% of the MODERATE group and 50.7% of the FAST group."

    Basically, what @NovusDies said. I don't think most of us would consider 0.68kg/week loss for the first month to be overly fast but it makes sense that people who lose faster in the first month lose more in the first 6 months. I also agree with novus that 18 months isn't a long time when talking about weight struggles.

    For me personally - I have been a yo-yo dieter my whole life. I have lost weight quickly and lost it slowly. When I lose it quickly, I don't learn actually learn anything and then go back to my previous eating habits that make me overweight to begin with. Losing slowly allows to me to better learn what does and does not work for me and to change habits and even my tastes in a manner that is beneficial to me in the long term.
  • MikePTYMikePTY Posts: 3,394Member, Premium Member Posts: 3,394Member, Premium Member
    puffbrat wrote: »
    Method: "Groups were drawn from participants in the TOURS trial, which included a sample of middle-aged (mean =59.3 years) obese women (mean BMI =36.8) who received a 6-month lifestyle intervention followed by a 1-year extended care program. Participants were encouraged to reduce caloric intake to achieve weight losses of 0.45 kg/ week. Groups were categorized as “FAST” (≥0.68 kg/week, n=69), “MODERATE” (≥0.23 and <0.68 kg/week, n= 104), and “SLOW” (<0.23 kg/week, n=89) based on rate of weight loss during first month of treatment."

    Result: "At 18 months, 50.7% of participants in the FAST group, 35.6% of participants in the MODERATE group, and 16.9% of participants in the SLOW group maintained a clinically significant 10% reduction in body weight."

    Discussion: "There were three key findings with regards to weight outcomes. First, women who lost weight at a FAST rate during the first 4 weeks of treatment achieved significantly greater weight reductions at 6 months than those who lost at MODERATE and SLOW rates, and those who lost at a MODERATE rate during the first 4 weeks of treatment lost significantly more weight than those who lost at a SLOW rate. At 18 months, the FAST group maintained a significantly greater weight loss than the SLOW group. These findings are consistent with previous research demonstrating that larger initial weight losses are associated with greater long-term weight loss success [10, 12–15, 21, 30].

    Second, no significant differences between groups were observed in terms of weight regain. Contrary to previous research [15, 17], participants in the present study who lost at a greater initial rate did not experience greater amounts of weight regain post-treatment than those who lost at a slower initial rate.

    Third, the FAST and MODERATE group were 5.1 and 2.7 times, respectively, more likely to achieve successful and beneficial weight loss maintenance of 10% body weight reduction at 18-months follow-up than the SLOW group. Only 16.9% of the SLOW group attained this successful 10% weight loss in the year following active behavioral treatment compared to 35.6% of the MODERATE group and 50.7% of the FAST group."

    Basically, what @NovusDies said. I don't think most of us would consider 0.68kg/week loss for the first month to be overly fast but it makes sense that people who lose faster in the first month lose more in the first 6 months. I also agree with novus that 18 months isn't a long time when talking about weight struggles.

    For me personally - I have been a yo-yo dieter my whole life. I have lost weight quickly and lost it slowly. When I lose it quickly, I don't learn actually learn anything and then go back to my previous eating habits that make me overweight to begin with. Losing slowly allows to me to better learn what does and does not work for me and to change habits and even my tastes in a manner that is beneficial to me in the long term.

    The first bolded is a pretty important qualifier. The "fast" loss falls squarely within the recommendations here. Especially in the first month, where there is a lot of water weight loss. That doesn't strike me as very fast. It's not a study on choosing faster than the recommendations here.
  • NovusDiesNovusDies Posts: 5,971Member, Premium Member Posts: 5,971Member, Premium Member
    puffbrat wrote: »
    Method: "Groups were drawn from participants in the TOURS trial, which included a sample of middle-aged (mean =59.3 years) obese women (mean BMI =36.8) who received a 6-month lifestyle intervention followed by a 1-year extended care program. Participants were encouraged to reduce caloric intake to achieve weight losses of 0.45 kg/ week. Groups were categorized as “FAST” (≥0.68 kg/week, n=69), “MODERATE” (≥0.23 and <0.68 kg/week, n= 104), and “SLOW” (<0.23 kg/week, n=89) based on rate of weight loss during first month of treatment."

    Result: "At 18 months, 50.7% of participants in the FAST group, 35.6% of participants in the MODERATE group, and 16.9% of participants in the SLOW group maintained a clinically significant 10% reduction in body weight."

    Discussion: "There were three key findings with regards to weight outcomes. First, women who lost weight at a FAST rate during the first 4 weeks of treatment achieved significantly greater weight reductions at 6 months than those who lost at MODERATE and SLOW rates, and those who lost at a MODERATE rate during the first 4 weeks of treatment lost significantly more weight than those who lost at a SLOW rate. At 18 months, the FAST group maintained a significantly greater weight loss than the SLOW group. These findings are consistent with previous research demonstrating that larger initial weight losses are associated with greater long-term weight loss success [10, 12–15, 21, 30].

    Second, no significant differences between groups were observed in terms of weight regain. Contrary to previous research [15, 17], participants in the present study who lost at a greater initial rate did not experience greater amounts of weight regain post-treatment than those who lost at a slower initial rate.

    Third, the FAST and MODERATE group were 5.1 and 2.7 times, respectively, more likely to achieve successful and beneficial weight loss maintenance of 10% body weight reduction at 18-months follow-up than the SLOW group. Only 16.9% of the SLOW group attained this successful 10% weight loss in the year following active behavioral treatment compared to 35.6% of the MODERATE group and 50.7% of the FAST group."

    Basically, what @NovusDies said. I don't think most of us would consider 0.68kg/week loss for the first month to be overly fast but it makes sense that people who lose faster in the first month lose more in the first 6 months. I also agree with novus that 18 months isn't a long time when talking about weight struggles.

    For me personally - I have been a yo-yo dieter my whole life. I have lost weight quickly and lost it slowly. When I lose it quickly, I don't learn actually learn anything and then go back to my previous eating habits that make me overweight to begin with. Losing slowly allows to me to better learn what does and does not work for me and to change habits and even my tastes in a manner that is beneficial to me in the long term.


    Right and if you took a person who could lose faster in a healthy and sustainable fashion and forced them to lose slower it could have a very negative impact on their initial survivability. At first a higher deficit has advantages. While not impossible it makes it less likely that a person eats so much it puts them back to maintenance each day. It also helps avoid "plateau" thinking. Basically it gives a person time to hopefully learn how to log correctly and learn about scale fluctuations before they become problems.

    I don't recall anyone here telling a person that qualified for losing at a higher rate and could do so comfortably to lose slower.
    edited December 2
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