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How do you stay motivated when you don't see any results?

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  • TishTashSTishTashS Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
    Here, the most common advice you'll get is to weigh everything you eat and log it accurately. This is because it works well for those with a healthy mindset where food and tracking are concerned.

    However, if you find yourself getting obsessive when tracking calories, this indicates a possible disordered eating mindset. You should check in with yourself to see why you start to feel obsessive when you try to track. Do you feel stressed if occasionally you are unable to track something? Are you unkind to yourself if you don't do it perfectly? Do you put pressure on yourself to track, to the point where it is detrimental to your mental wellbeing?

    CICO works, but is not worth causing negative effects on your mental health and wellbeing.
    If you are struggling with unhealthy thoughts and behaviours surrounding food, it would be a good idea to access help from a mental health professional, or a registered dietitian with experience in disordered eating.

    You do not have to have a fully developed eating disorder to engage in disordered eating behaviours. In my job, I have seen many patients who think that the thoughts and behaviours around food are completely normal, even when it causes them to be miserable. If strict CICO makes you miserable, then it's not the method for you.
  • PhdcynPhdcyn Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
    Weightloss is a journey & it's different for everyone. Make good food choices & exercise, but don't feel like a failure if one or both of those parts don't come together in weightloss. Work on small steps & doing better the next day, but don't obsess over it.

    For the last 18 months i have been working out at a gym, in classes that push me hard 3 to 4 days a week. I had expected in a year to have been under 200 lbs, I'm not. i have wanted to give up, but then i notice something small, some improvement that to anyone else might mean nothing. I started out not being able to do a proper squat, then my trainers had me doing them with a ball on the wall... one day in class i was doing them, like everyone else without my ball on the wall, i was doing real squats... it took 18mths to get there. I started & my knees are *kitten*, like need surgery bad, I'm not saying my knees are great now but i can't do box step ups on something higher than a foot now & i can even do box jumps.

    My point is, don't be discouraged by the scale not moving, you may be in the process of your body exchanging fat for muscle, so your clothes might fit looser. You may be more flexible than last week. You may be able to walk 30mins without feeling like you're going to die. Look for the little things to keep you motivated when that scale refuses to budge.

    I hate doing weigh ins at my gym, because i don't see a lot of weightloss like others do. I did my inbody last week (measures muscle, fat, weight & water content), I'd lost a tenth of a pound, but I'd lost 8lbs of fat, gained 4.5lbs of muscle & still have water weight issues...i couldn't see this on the scale, my trainers did in how my body looked.

    You Are Doing Great!
  • ebeever115ebeever115 Member Posts: 42 Member Member Posts: 42 Member
    TishTashS wrote: »
    Here, the most common advice you'll get is to weigh everything you eat and log it accurately. This is because it works well for those with a healthy mindset where food and tracking are concerned.

    However, if you find yourself getting obsessive when tracking calories, this indicates a possible disordered eating mindset. You should check in with yourself to see why you start to feel obsessive when you try to track. Do you feel stressed if occasionally you are unable to track something? Are you unkind to yourself if you don't do it perfectly? Do you put pressure on yourself to track, to the point where it is detrimental to your mental wellbeing?

    CICO works, but is not worth causing negative effects on your mental health and wellbeing.
    If you are struggling with unhealthy thoughts and behaviours surrounding food, it would be a good idea to access help from a mental health professional, or a registered dietitian with experience in disordered eating.

    You do not have to have a fully developed eating disorder to engage in disordered eating behaviours. In my job, I have seen many patients who think that the thoughts and behaviours around food are completely normal, even when it causes them to be miserable. If strict CICO makes you miserable, then it's not the method for you.

    Thankfully, one thing I know for sure is that this isn't the issue! My frustration with logging calories comes from being a perfectionist. For example, I'd prefer to be able to weigh out and measure everything on my plate but sometimes that just isn't practical. Like when eating out! I really appreciate you making that post though because for some people, that could definitely be an issue!

    I've thought about it and I'm going to try a method of tracking that works for me. I have to realize that not every single tiny crumb is able to be tracked! So as long as I'm taking my best guess and estimating on the side of more rather than less, I think that's a good start for me.
    Thanks everyone!
    edited February 17
  • RobAS355RobAS355 Member, Premium Posts: 16 Member Member, Premium Posts: 16 Member
    I think what you are actually looking for is an easier way.

    I was 240lb, I got down to 179lb. I now weigh 190lb by choice.

    The only way I did it was weighing all my food and counting macros, I never wanted to be that obsessive but I had to be if I wanted to reach my goals. It can often seem selfish to others and anti-social, not going out for supper and drinks.

    Find out your BMR, set a macro ratio that has minimal fat intake, and carbs should be half your protein intake. Either eat at maintenance calories and use exercise to implement a deficit or add a 500calorie deficit yourself and skip the gym.

    Stick to a 500calorie deficit, anything more and you will get to the point of diminishing returns and you will just be torturing yourself and put in a cheat meal once a week to keep yourself sane.

    You can think you know what caloric value you are eating everyday but unless you measure it you'll never know exactly and consistency is key. And macros are important, to low on carbs and you'll feel drained and exhausted everyday. Too little protein and you will lose lean body mass, and lean body mass is important because in directly effects your BMR.

    Do lots of research on youtube and set goals to keep yourself accountable.

    You will lose weight but you need to follow a better program. Best of luck to you.

    edited February 17
  • Nony_MouseNony_Mouse Member Posts: 5,355 Member Member Posts: 5,355 Member
    TishTashS wrote: »
    Here, the most common advice you'll get is to weigh everything you eat and log it accurately. This is because it works well for those with a healthy mindset where food and tracking are concerned.

    However, if you find yourself getting obsessive when tracking calories, this indicates a possible disordered eating mindset. You should check in with yourself to see why you start to feel obsessive when you try to track. Do you feel stressed if occasionally you are unable to track something? Are you unkind to yourself if you don't do it perfectly? Do you put pressure on yourself to track, to the point where it is detrimental to your mental wellbeing?

    CICO works, but is not worth causing negative effects on your mental health and wellbeing.
    If you are struggling with unhealthy thoughts and behaviours surrounding food, it would be a good idea to access help from a mental health professional, or a registered dietitian with experience in disordered eating.

    You do not have to have a fully developed eating disorder to engage in disordered eating behaviours. In my job, I have seen many patients who think that the thoughts and behaviours around food are completely normal, even when it causes them to be miserable. If strict CICO makes you miserable, then it's not the method for you.

    You're conflating CICO with calorie counting. They're not the same thing. CICO = calories in vs calories out. It's how weight management works. If CI is less than CO, you lose weight. If it's the same, you maintain. If CI is greater, you gain. Everyone is 'doing' some form of CICO all the time. Calorie counting on the other hand is a method of creating a calorie deficit so that CI is less than CO.
  • meegerzebmeegerzeb Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    It sounds like all of your hard work it is actually paying off - it sounds like you've built a lot of muscle, which means the scale won't change a lot. If you're noticing a change in your clothes, you're on the right track.
  • wwwtheselion11wwwtheselion11 Member Posts: 424 Member Member Posts: 424 Member
    So form my experience with my weight jumping. Its eather what you are eating. Try doing organic protein smoothies. Instead of meals. I can make a smoothie close to 400 calories. I am eating only 1200 calories. Was doing 1500, but wasn't seeing any changes. Now i see big results. Im at 176. Going for 160. Was 235 8 months ago
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