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The Great Fitness Scam

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  • SmallMimiSmallMimi Member Posts: 540 Member Member Posts: 540 Member
    I think that too many people are looking for the "quick and easy" fix. Even when you find something you enjoy, doing it is not going to make the extra pounds of fat disappear overnight or build those extra muscles immediately.
    edited February 29
  • RGILLESP1RGILLESP1 Member, Premium Posts: 8 Member Member, Premium Posts: 8 Member
    I think when people say they want a workout that's fun, what they really mean is that they want a workout that is varied and interesting. I prefer doing a variety of different things like battle ropes and medicine balls for cardio time, for example, rather than walking on a treadmill. I think there are a lot of people out there who don't know that there are more interesting ways to exercise besides the traditional repetitive tasks that so many people seem to default to. No one expects the gym to feel like a roller coaster at Disney World but it's pretty awesome to be able to workout in a way that doesn't become monotonous and boring. People are stuck in offices all day doing redundant crap and they need to be able to move around and shake things up with workouts in their free time to let off some steam.
  • Tack1747Tack1747 Member Posts: 7 Member Member Posts: 7 Member
    "Find an exercise that you love" ... yeah I'd go for that... I like lifting weights and playing rugby.. hitting people (legally !!) on a rugby field and being part of a team or lifting that last rep makes me feel good... you can never discount the release of endorphins, dopamine and serotonin to lift your mood.

    Every year, the great New Year fitness regime begins for thousands of people here in the UK and within weeks, it tapers off again to the long game gym users, the ones that put in the hard yards and are educated about fitness. The problem we have is that, as stated above in numerous posts, there is no "silver bullet" to getting that perfect beach body or whatever you're striving for... you HAVE to put the effort in and that's where the education comes into play. Im not sure how much the UK spends on fitness and fitness related activities but just buying a pair of trainers and going for a run or buying an elliptical machine for your spare room isn't going to cut it for the majority of people.
  • tbright1965tbright1965 Member, Premium Posts: 845 Member Member, Premium Posts: 845 Member
    Well, it was barely sub 200# and it was in the 1980s, but I was running 2 miles in 13:00 flat for the Army. At the time, my time for a 100% on the 2 mile run was 13:02.

    I hovered between 190 and 195# and they were always on me to lose weight. But I was built like a 5'11" linebacker, and I'd max my APFT doing 70+ pushups 80+ situps and run my mile in about 13 flat.

    I threw up almost every run, but I got a 300, which was the max you could get.

    And no, it wasn't fun.
    Not sure how well one can get a buy in if people never find a way to actually enjoy the workout. Extrinsic motivation seems to be a rather weak motivator.

    If I'm overgeneralizing and it is just we need to have people realistically accept some workouts are going to suck, but you might need to get through them anyway, sure.

    I think part of the problem for fitness routines is with weight being such a problem, exercise and weight loss are interlinked, but weight loss adds a big component to the suck of any exercise. In a deficit, jogging for a mile can be a grinding chore. At maintenance, it can quickly become surprising how doable 10k, then 10mi becomes, with a certain bit of that runner's euphoria at the end - that part never seems to show up in deficits.

    Not to mention that many forms of exercise feel easier or are more enjoyable when one is within a healthy weight range and at a decent level of fitness, at least in my experience.

    Running at 155 pounds feels a lot different to me than running at 115.

    When you're new to fitness, it's sometimes hard to understand that the specific way that it's hard won't be that way forever. When your body isn't used to moving a lot, it feels so awkward to move. Now that my body is used to moving, I still have hard workouts but they're not hard in the same way that getting basic fitness is hard.

    I wouldn't know, if I ever ran at 155, it was before I was a teenager.

    I do remember the worst run of my life was trying to get under a 10 minute mile and I was still around or over 200. I think I was 5-15 seconds off. I was sure I was going to puke in the bathroom at the store I went to after, and just barely kept it in.
    In the 160s I didn't feel anything like that running a faster pace for 13 miles.

  • NorthCascadesNorthCascades Member Posts: 9,783 Member Member Posts: 9,783 Member
    RGILLESP1 wrote: »
    I think when people say they want a workout that's fun, what they really mean is that they want a workout that is varied and interesting. I prefer doing a variety of different things like battle ropes and medicine balls for cardio time, for example, rather than walking on a treadmill. I think there are a lot of people out there who don't know that there are more interesting ways to exercise besides the traditional repetitive tasks that so many people seem to default to. No one expects the gym to feel like a roller coaster at Disney World but it's pretty awesome to be able to workout in a way that doesn't become monotonous and boring. People are stuck in offices all day doing redundant crap and they need to be able to move around and shake things up with workouts in their free time to let off some steam.

    I finally got around to writing up my New Year resolutions. All but one are exercise related, all cardio: a bunch of hikes I want to do, some peaks to climb, mountain bike trails, etc. 😁
  • rhtexasgalrhtexasgal Member Posts: 548 Member Member Posts: 548 Member
    RGILLESP1 wrote: »
    I think when people say they want a workout that's fun, what they really mean is that they want a workout that is varied and interesting. I prefer doing a variety of different things like battle ropes and medicine balls for cardio time, for example, rather than walking on a treadmill. I think there are a lot of people out there who don't know that there are more interesting ways to exercise besides the traditional repetitive tasks that so many people seem to default to. No one expects the gym to feel like a roller coaster at Disney World but it's pretty awesome to be able to workout in a way that doesn't become monotonous and boring. People are stuck in offices all day doing redundant crap and they need to be able to move around and shake things up with workouts in their free time to let off some steam.

    This right here! I get bored easily and will slack off if I don't mix things up. Over the last 5 years, I have created exercise cards outlining exercises for each body part as well as compound movements, cardio options, etc. The day before my workouts, I will do a "mix and match" and plan my workout out in advance! That way, there is no hesitation in the gym trying to figure out what I am going to do. These cards were created due to investing in myself - spending money on a trainer for a while so I now know that there could be dozens of ways to work out my biceps, thighs, etc. I like trying new things so I am always on the lookout for variations.
  • gothchiqgothchiq Member Posts: 4,536 Member Member Posts: 4,536 Member
    My crummy perspective: People don't want to suffer. They look for "hacks" and "cheats" to get around it. Sorry, man. Life is pain. If it's worth it to take charge of your health, accept that some parts are gonna hurt and suck it up.
  • Bry_Fitness70Bry_Fitness70 Member Posts: 2,484 Member Member Posts: 2,484 Member
    gothchiq wrote: »
    My crummy perspective: People don't want to suffer. They look for "hacks" and "cheats" to get around it. Sorry, man. Life is pain. If it's worth it to take charge of your health, accept that some parts are gonna hurt and suck it up.

    I totally agree.

    People have to realize that they are not escaping pain by avoiding exercise, but are just delaying it. They can get usually get away with being sedentary into their late 30s and early 40s, but beyond that, they will start to feel a variety of pain that is far worse. Most middle-aged people who do not exercise and watch what they eat are experiencing all kinds of pain, mobility issues, energy issues, and need medical procedures and prescription drugs to get by. The pain of consistent exercise is trivial in comparison.
  • Bari_ToneBari_Tone Member Posts: 44 Member Member Posts: 44 Member
    My favorite line in the article - Eat food, not too much...

    Thanks for posting OP!

  • Bry_Fitness70Bry_Fitness70 Member Posts: 2,484 Member Member Posts: 2,484 Member
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    gothchiq wrote: »
    My crummy perspective: People don't want to suffer. They look for "hacks" and "cheats" to get around it. Sorry, man. Life is pain. If it's worth it to take charge of your health, accept that some parts are gonna hurt and suck it up.

    I totally agree.

    People have to realize that they are not escaping pain by avoiding exercise, but are just delaying it. They can get usually get away with being sedentary into their late 30s and early 40s, but beyond that, they will start to feel a variety of pain that is far worse. Most middle-aged people who do not exercise and watch what they eat are experiencing all kinds of pain, mobility issues, energy issues, and need medical procedures and prescription drugs to get by. The pain of consistent exercise is trivial in comparison.

    Once again, I agree but disagree. :flowerforyou:

    100%, 1000%, the price that my most inactive real-life age-mate (I'm 64) friends are paying for inactivity is a high price. There is physical pain, life limitations (limited walking/stairs-requiring entertainment like art fairs, music festivals, museums, stadiums for concerts or sports), expensive meds/doctors, needing to hire more services or depend on children/neighbors, poorer recovery from more frequent/common surgery, less hearty immune systems, more medications mean more side effects and unexpected consequences from combining, limitations on what they can eat/drink because of health conditions and meds, and more.

    I still think that most people can get enough exercise to avoid that - or at least delay it significantly - without much suffering or actual pain, if they're smart about it.

    I feel like some fitness enthusiasts find some motivation or reward in being tough enough to tolerate pain when they push themselves to their limits. That can be a fine thing, I don't oppose it; I get it, even. If nothing else, endorphins are fun; but I think there's more to that enjoyment of the extreme, psychologically, than just endorphins or other known neuro-chemical rewards. Repeating: That's not a personal criticism, it's just saying that I think there are individually different orientations to the question.

    But I don't get the "people need to suffer" or what looks (to the casual observer) like pride about tolerating or even celebrating pain in the interests of fitness. I get that athletes, when we gather, have one-up conversations about the toughness of workouts and tests, how much we can tolerate, etc. Cool.

    Feeling that pride and talking it up with workout buddies is one thing, celebrating it in general-population conversation is potentially adding discouragements to people who might consider being more active if we focused on the enjoyable aspects . . . especially in that, IMO, the true pain and suffereing is utterly optional.

    To be more pointed: I also have age-mate friends who are routinely active, but frankly don't work all that hard. They're getting the overwhelming majority of the benefits that I see in active age-mate friends who do really push themselves to physically challenging and even painful points. Futher, there are friends my age who are long-term excellent athletes (former Div I NCAA athletes who stayed very active, for example) who are having negative consequences from all that lifelong hard-push working out. Are they better off than the inactive? Sure, absolutely. Better off than the sub-pain-threshold long-term active but not super hard-pushing group? I'm not too sure about that.

    I don't define "pain" as necessarily "OMG, I am suffering immensely every time I work out!", but more the discomfort of exertion from exercising. I would lump fatigue and boredom in with that. The grind of consistently exercising is painful/uncomfortable on a lot of levels.

    And yeah, there is a whole class of people who are former athletes who sacrificed their future health to perform at a high level in their youth. A lot of high school and college athletes I know ended up with bad knees, backs, and shoulders and have limited their mobility permanently.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 21,895 Member Member Posts: 21,895 Member
    I have a bad knee, so when I overdo activity, there is often discomfort. (It's only overdoing due to my knee. I'm no Cheryl Strayed in "Wild," lol.) But I tolerate the discomfort due to the exhilaration I get from hiking in the woods.
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