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Coronavirus prep

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  • hiparihipari Member, Premium Posts: 1,236 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,236 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    amart4224 wrote: »
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    amart4224 wrote: »
    ReenieHJ wrote: »
    An article in today's small town newspaper told about a couple who contracted Covid, after having been fully vaccinated. The wife had head cold symptoms and felt better in a couple days. The husband, however, is immune compromised and was very sick with it; a month in and he still feels very fatigued. I can only imagine if he hadn't been vaccinated, he might very well have died contracting Covid. :( However, the part of the article that left me scratching my head was it wasn't until his 4th test that he received a positive result??? I can see first or maybe even second test with positive not showing up. But he was clearly sick and had clearly been exposed. How many people are going to be persistent enough to test 4x, especially if a person is lucky enough to not feel very sick??

    There is so much that is still unknown in all of this. :(

    This kind of thing makes me wonder how many other illnesses he was tested for. If he was already vaccinated for COVID and had 3 negative COVID tests... maybe consider the possibility that he has flu, pneumonia, any other variety of illness with similar symptoms? Other diseases don't just disappear, and it seems irresponsible to only be testing for the "popular" one.

    I'm not sure I understand why he wouldn't be tested for Covid? And he did end up testing positive the 4th time. His wife had it and had tested positive so he knew he'd been in contact. I know of another case where one of the family members tested positive, was having symptoms then 2 more family members started having symptoms yet tested negative even after being tested more than once each. They never showed a positive test despite living with the infected person and having very similar symptoms.
    IOW I don't believe the tests to be so accurate that we should base all our answers/reactions on them. :)

    I guess I don't understand the purpose of testing for COVID if you're completely sure you have it and no amount of negative test results will convince you otherwise. Why waste resources and time running test after test, if you will only trust a positive result?

    I can't imagine going to a doctor with a sore throat, being tested for strep, getting a negative result, and having the doctor say "well we'll just keep testing for strep until we get a positive." They would probably move on to other possible causes of my sore throat.

    Despite getting your point, I have to share my experience with the last time I was tested for strep.

    She did the rapid test, which is known to be less accurate. It was negative. She simultaneously did the test that takes longer to get results. It was positive.

    I have been tested for just Lyme disease in the past. But now that I am aware that there is another tick-borne disease endemic to my mother's neighborhood, I know to insist on the "complete tick panel" rather than just Lyme disease. Last month, the testing turned up positive for a third tick-borne illness. OMG, I can't imagine if I had only been tested for Lyme and thus not treated!

    Perhaps with the "4 tests before a positive" guy it went something like this:
    1. Too soon for antibodies to show
    2. Still too soon
    3. Less accurate test
    4. Accurate test

    To add to step 1 ”too soon for antibodies to show”. Last autumn a colleague’s son (aged 10-ish) got covid from his sports team, and they would never have tested him if the team didn’t inform them of known exposure, as the son’s only symptom was a 3-hour headache. After the son was a confirmed case, the parents were tested on day 1 and day 4 of quarantine, I think, and the dad (my colleague) didn’t get any symptoms until probably a week after his son’s infection was confirmed. He tested a third time when he got symptoms, and that was his first positive. Nobody can know when exactly he was infected. We have strict quarantine rules and he’s a sensible dude so he stayed isolated from day 1, but in a different case he might have gone on to infect a bunch of people and, without the third test, contact tracing never might have happened.

    Having been in contact with him the day before they found out about the son’s infection (but he was already infected and could have passed it on to his dad), I for one was very happy that he got tested so many times so a) I got double confirmation that he likely didn’t have it when we met b) he openly shared that he got a positive, so I was able to pay extra attention to possible symptoms and stay home just to make extra sure I don’t spread it if I had happened to catch it anyway.

    In terms of quarantine orders and contact tracing, not to mention research, testing and tracking cases as accurately as possible is in my opinion very important. Even if it means getting tested multiple times.
  • jenilla1jenilla1 Member Posts: 10,990 Member Member Posts: 10,990 Member
    It is wild to me to be out and about today and it is like a switch has flipped… (almost) like nothing ever happened. Very very few masks seen, plexiglass barriers down, festivals and things starting up… we are still wearing masks indoors, I was a teetering germaphobe before all this happened and admittedly I like not breathing other peoples stuff as I go shopping… whether it is perfume, body odor, or germs.

    LOL, my husband says he has a few stinky co-workers, and the best thing about the masks is not smelling other people's odors. Apparently, the people with the worst breath like to get right up in your face for conversations... :p
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 6,847 Member Member Posts: 6,847 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Interesting change in vaccine advice - for Australia anyway.

    Interval between Covid vaccine and any other vaccine was 14 days either side.

    Has now been reduced to 7 and in exceptional circumstances can be given in under this.

    I don't know if the official advice has changed in the US yet, but I remember on TWiV recently they said that the original 2 week buffer was out of an abundance of caution as there was no data, and at this point they don't see any need. Someone had written in because they were leaving the country, had to get one vaccine before they left, but also wanted to get the covid shot because wherever they were going was having supply issues if I'm remembering correctly. And they advised him to load up.

    I don't know if it applies to covid vaccines, but when I was reading up on vaccine intervals for my shingles shots (which do, or at least did at the time, have an interval recommendation with respect to other vaccines), and wanting to figure out when I could get my seasonal flu shot and a tetanus booster that I needed, I discovered that you could get all on the same day and not have to worry about interval spacing. My recollection was that this was a general recommendation (I believe I was on the CDC site) for any vaccinations that require an interval before getting a different vaccine (not all vaccines require an interval -- my recollection is that it wouldn't have been an issue if it had just been the flu shot and the tetanus booster).

    Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor and all of the above is based on stuff I read nearly a year ago, so my memory could be off on details, although I'm confident on my main point about same-day vaccination being an option in lieu of interval spacing.


    That's because shingles vaccine is a live vaccine

    Our standard recomendation in Australia is that live vaccines can be given on same day - but if not, have a 4 week interval.

    Since flu and tetanus are not live vaccines this does not apply to them
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 6,847 Member Member Posts: 6,847 Member
    You're assuming he wasn't also being continually tested for other conditions as wel

    Surely he would of been.

    Here in Australia we have rapid turnaround around covid tests - people who are contacts of cases,or mild symptoms to rule out covid, that sort of thing

    But people who are ill would get full PCR range which includes influenza, whooping cough etc.
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,869 Member Member Posts: 8,869 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Interesting change in vaccine advice - for Australia anyway.

    Interval between Covid vaccine and any other vaccine was 14 days either side.

    Has now been reduced to 7 and in exceptional circumstances can be given in under this.

    I don't know if the official advice has changed in the US yet, but I remember on TWiV recently they said that the original 2 week buffer was out of an abundance of caution as there was no data, and at this point they don't see any need. Someone had written in because they were leaving the country, had to get one vaccine before they left, but also wanted to get the covid shot because wherever they were going was having supply issues if I'm remembering correctly. And they advised him to load up.

    I don't know if it applies to covid vaccines, but when I was reading up on vaccine intervals for my shingles shots (which do, or at least did at the time, have an interval recommendation with respect to other vaccines), and wanting to figure out when I could get my seasonal flu shot and a tetanus booster that I needed, I discovered that you could get all on the same day and not have to worry about interval spacing. My recollection was that this was a general recommendation (I believe I was on the CDC site) for any vaccinations that require an interval before getting a different vaccine (not all vaccines require an interval -- my recollection is that it wouldn't have been an issue if it had just been the flu shot and the tetanus booster).

    Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor and all of the above is based on stuff I read nearly a year ago, so my memory could be off on details, although I'm confident on my main point about same-day vaccination being an option in lieu of interval spacing.


    That's because shingles vaccine is a live vaccine

    Our standard recomendation in Australia is that live vaccines can be given on same day - but if not, have a 4 week interval.

    Since flu and tetanus are not live vaccines this does not apply to them

    Thanks.
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 24,277 Member Member Posts: 24,277 Member
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Interesting change in vaccine advice - for Australia anyway.

    Interval between Covid vaccine and any other vaccine was 14 days either side.

    Has now been reduced to 7 and in exceptional circumstances can be given in under this.

    I don't know if the official advice has changed in the US yet, but I remember on TWiV recently they said that the original 2 week buffer was out of an abundance of caution as there was no data, and at this point they don't see any need. Someone had written in because they were leaving the country, had to get one vaccine before they left, but also wanted to get the covid shot because wherever they were going was having supply issues if I'm remembering correctly. And they advised him to load up.

    I don't know if it applies to covid vaccines, but when I was reading up on vaccine intervals for my shingles shots (which do, or at least did at the time, have an interval recommendation with respect to other vaccines), and wanting to figure out when I could get my seasonal flu shot and a tetanus booster that I needed, I discovered that you could get all on the same day and not have to worry about interval spacing. My recollection was that this was a general recommendation (I believe I was on the CDC site) for any vaccinations that require an interval before getting a different vaccine (not all vaccines require an interval -- my recollection is that it wouldn't have been an issue if it had just been the flu shot and the tetanus booster).

    Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor and all of the above is based on stuff I read nearly a year ago, so my memory could be off on details, although I'm confident on my main point about same-day vaccination being an option in lieu of interval spacing.


    That's because shingles vaccine is a live vaccine

    Our standard recomendation in Australia is that live vaccines can be given on same day - but if not, have a 4 week interval.

    Since flu and tetanus are not live vaccines this does not apply to them

    While Zostavax, which you use in Australia, is a live vaccine, Shingrix, what I received in the US, is not.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 6,847 Member Member Posts: 6,847 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    kimny72 wrote: »
    Interesting change in vaccine advice - for Australia anyway.

    Interval between Covid vaccine and any other vaccine was 14 days either side.

    Has now been reduced to 7 and in exceptional circumstances can be given in under this.

    I don't know if the official advice has changed in the US yet, but I remember on TWiV recently they said that the original 2 week buffer was out of an abundance of caution as there was no data, and at this point they don't see any need. Someone had written in because they were leaving the country, had to get one vaccine before they left, but also wanted to get the covid shot because wherever they were going was having supply issues if I'm remembering correctly. And they advised him to load up.

    I don't know if it applies to covid vaccines, but when I was reading up on vaccine intervals for my shingles shots (which do, or at least did at the time, have an interval recommendation with respect to other vaccines), and wanting to figure out when I could get my seasonal flu shot and a tetanus booster that I needed, I discovered that you could get all on the same day and not have to worry about interval spacing. My recollection was that this was a general recommendation (I believe I was on the CDC site) for any vaccinations that require an interval before getting a different vaccine (not all vaccines require an interval -- my recollection is that it wouldn't have been an issue if it had just been the flu shot and the tetanus booster).

    Disclaimer: I'm not a doctor and all of the above is based on stuff I read nearly a year ago, so my memory could be off on details, although I'm confident on my main point about same-day vaccination being an option in lieu of interval spacing.


    That's because shingles vaccine is a live vaccine

    Our standard recomendation in Australia is that live vaccines can be given on same day - but if not, have a 4 week interval.

    Since flu and tetanus are not live vaccines this does not apply to them

    While Zostavax, which you use in Australia, is a live vaccine, Shingrix, what I received in the US, is not.


    That may be so about Shingrix - but what I said about intervals applies to live vaccines whatever they are.

    And doesn't apply to flu and tetanus ( other vaccines poster mentioned) as they are not live vaccines.
  • SuzySunshine99SuzySunshine99 Member Posts: 2,382 Member Member Posts: 2,382 Member
    It seems "return to work" plans are changing everyday for office-based workers.

    In my workplace, they are currently saying that they will start phasing people back in during July. A "slow roll" with everyone working 2-3 days a week in the office. Some people are pushing to keep at least a partial work from home option, but that's not really fair for a lot of our staff, who HAVE to be on site.

    Our sister company (different company, but same ownership) just announced that they want everyone back 100 percent, no more working remotely at all, as of August 1. When I heard that, I'm wondering if we'll do the same.
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