Coronavirus prep

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  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    edited January 7
    There are also a lot of people who are hospitalized with covid but not because of covid. So, someone goes in the hospital because of a kidney infection, is tested and has Covid. Covid didn't put them in the hospital, but they are still listed as a covid patient in the hospital. On the news they said that that was often the case with children in the hospital, they tested postitive but were in the hospital for other reasons.

    That has bothered me as well. Some friend called my husband recently. The wife went to the hospital as she was in labor and needed to deliver her baby. Was tested upon admission, and came out positive for Covid. Husband shared that they told the wife she was being admitted for Covid. This is of course hearsay, but these stories could not exist (fake or real) if the reporting was better defined.

    If you see my post above, I heard good news this morning that starting next week Massachusetts will be changing how Covid hospital admissions are defined.

    Edit: @ahoy_m8 saw your post after my response to @spiriteagle99. This whole situation is so ripe for breeding distrust, which then justifies people deciding whether the "rules" make sense and whether they should be followed.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ythannah wrote: »
    what do you mean you didnt report it?

    Don't you have to report positive RATS tests and/or follow up with official PCR test?

    Here in Ontario, public health testing is becoming overwhelmed and the latest guideline restricts eligibility for PCR tests. Contact tracing and testing is out the window at this point. So, no, a positive rapid antigen test will not be followed up with a PCR for the majority of people.

    I haven't seen or heard of any requirement to report rapid test results, unless there is something to that effect in whatever literature accompanies the test itself (I've never seen one).

    eta I have no idea where Sarah7591 resides, just reporting the current state of testing here

    The instructions on the rapid test tell you to follow up with a PCR test, but there is nothing about reporting it. We did follow up with PCR tests - mostly because my rapid tests kept coming back negative even though I obviously had extensive exposures - I wanted to confirm with a more sensitive test. (Our PCR tests were on December 24 so we were using the guidelines at the time - I know they have changed since then.)

    Of course my PCR test got lost and never was uploaded to the system. The pharmacist checked with the lab and told me verbally it was negative, but he also said it would be uploaded within 24 hours and it never was so who knows.

    well, no, there is nothing about reporting it in patient instructions here in Aust either - patients don't have to report PCR tests, their medical service does so.

    They are meant to follow up any positive RATS tests with PCR test though - which if positive then gets reported to Communicable Disease branch by your medical provider

    Yes our PCR tests are reported by the provider as well. I was talking about the rapid tests you do at home. Unless you follow up with a PCR (which we can't even do now) they do not get reported anywhere.

    will be interesting to see how this plays out in Australia now one does not have to follow up a positive RATS test with a PCR test.

    PCR tests are reported by your medical provider

    You are suppossed to let your medical provider know of positive RATS test so they can report it - whether everyone does so will be another matter.

    I guess quite a lot will because they want to do the right thing and/or will want medical certificates for school, work etc - but I doubt everyone will.

    In Tasmania and Victoria those who have a positive RAT have to register details to the relevant health department not the patient's medical provider, I assume the same in NSW (if not its coming soon). Numbers are quite high and local clinics would be overrun it people had to report their medical provider.

    Tasmania has an online registration page as does Victoria. Not sure what's happening elsewhere.

    Curious what the consequences are if one does not report positive test findings. Depending, could it be that not everyone reports their results?
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,090 Member
    for anyone interested, here is a news article: https://www.nbcboston.com/news/local/mass-to-change-the-way-it-reports-covid-19-hospitalizations/2606930/

    was actually an interesting read. Much more detail on this topic than the two sentences mentioned on the AM news.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,625 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ythannah wrote: »
    what do you mean you didnt report it?

    Don't you have to report positive RATS tests and/or follow up with official PCR test?

    Here in Ontario, public health testing is becoming overwhelmed and the latest guideline restricts eligibility for PCR tests. Contact tracing and testing is out the window at this point. So, no, a positive rapid antigen test will not be followed up with a PCR for the majority of people.

    I haven't seen or heard of any requirement to report rapid test results, unless there is something to that effect in whatever literature accompanies the test itself (I've never seen one).

    eta I have no idea where Sarah7591 resides, just reporting the current state of testing here

    The instructions on the rapid test tell you to follow up with a PCR test, but there is nothing about reporting it. We did follow up with PCR tests - mostly because my rapid tests kept coming back negative even though I obviously had extensive exposures - I wanted to confirm with a more sensitive test. (Our PCR tests were on December 24 so we were using the guidelines at the time - I know they have changed since then.)

    Of course my PCR test got lost and never was uploaded to the system. The pharmacist checked with the lab and told me verbally it was negative, but he also said it would be uploaded within 24 hours and it never was so who knows.

    well, no, there is nothing about reporting it in patient instructions here in Aust either - patients don't have to report PCR tests, their medical service does so.

    They are meant to follow up any positive RATS tests with PCR test though - which if positive then gets reported to Communicable Disease branch by your medical provider

    Yes our PCR tests are reported by the provider as well. I was talking about the rapid tests you do at home. Unless you follow up with a PCR (which we can't even do now) they do not get reported anywhere.

    will be interesting to see how this plays out in Australia now one does not have to follow up a positive RATS test with a PCR test.

    PCR tests are reported by your medical provider

    You are suppossed to let your medical provider know of positive RATS test so they can report it - whether everyone does so will be another matter.

    I guess quite a lot will because they want to do the right thing and/or will want medical certificates for school, work etc - but I doubt everyone will.

    In Tasmania and Victoria those who have a positive RAT have to register details to the relevant health department not the patient's medical provider, I assume the same in NSW (if not its coming soon). Numbers are quite high and local clinics would be overrun it people had to report their medical provider.

    Tasmania has an online registration page as does Victoria. Not sure what's happening elsewhere.


    I wish we had that in SA

    But, no, the system here is your GP clinic does it once you notify them of your result.

    Yes I expect to be over run doing covid notifications.
  • ythannah
    ythannah Posts: 4,187 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    News stated that starting next week, here in Massachusetts the state will change how COVID is reported. They will distinguish between being admitted DUE to Covid vs admitted WITH Covid. I think they are at least a year late as the blurring of that distinction certainly fuels confusion, as well as conspiracy talk.

    Coincidentally I happened to notice a news article today that Ontario will be switching to the same type of reporting with regard to deaths.
  • tiptoethruthetulips
    tiptoethruthetulips Posts: 3,305 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    33gail33 wrote: »
    ythannah wrote: »
    what do you mean you didnt report it?

    Don't you have to report positive RATS tests and/or follow up with official PCR test?

    Here in Ontario, public health testing is becoming overwhelmed and the latest guideline restricts eligibility for PCR tests. Contact tracing and testing is out the window at this point. So, no, a positive rapid antigen test will not be followed up with a PCR for the majority of people.

    I haven't seen or heard of any requirement to report rapid test results, unless there is something to that effect in whatever literature accompanies the test itself (I've never seen one).

    eta I have no idea where Sarah7591 resides, just reporting the current state of testing here

    The instructions on the rapid test tell you to follow up with a PCR test, but there is nothing about reporting it. We did follow up with PCR tests - mostly because my rapid tests kept coming back negative even though I obviously had extensive exposures - I wanted to confirm with a more sensitive test. (Our PCR tests were on December 24 so we were using the guidelines at the time - I know they have changed since then.)

    Of course my PCR test got lost and never was uploaded to the system. The pharmacist checked with the lab and told me verbally it was negative, but he also said it would be uploaded within 24 hours and it never was so who knows.

    well, no, there is nothing about reporting it in patient instructions here in Aust either - patients don't have to report PCR tests, their medical service does so.

    They are meant to follow up any positive RATS tests with PCR test though - which if positive then gets reported to Communicable Disease branch by your medical provider

    Yes our PCR tests are reported by the provider as well. I was talking about the rapid tests you do at home. Unless you follow up with a PCR (which we can't even do now) they do not get reported anywhere.

    will be interesting to see how this plays out in Australia now one does not have to follow up a positive RATS test with a PCR test.

    PCR tests are reported by your medical provider

    You are suppossed to let your medical provider know of positive RATS test so they can report it - whether everyone does so will be another matter.

    I guess quite a lot will because they want to do the right thing and/or will want medical certificates for school, work etc - but I doubt everyone will.

    In Tasmania and Victoria those who have a positive RAT have to register details to the relevant health department not the patient's medical provider, I assume the same in NSW (if not its coming soon). Numbers are quite high and local clinics would be overrun it people had to report their medical provider.

    Tasmania has an online registration page as does Victoria. Not sure what's happening elsewhere.

    Curious what the consequences are if one does not report positive test findings. Depending, could it be that not everyone reports their results?

    I don't believe there are any real consequences, but if someone wants to access the financial support available for not being able to work they need to have registered first plus it allows the health department to offer services, for instance in Tasmania there is the [email protected] kit that has monitoring equipment, daily check in calls from the health department etc.

    Hopefully people will do the right thing and stay home if they have a positive RAT, but I assume the majority will have cared enough to do the test in the first instance and so will stay home and isolate.
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,625 Member
    and further to tiptoe's post.

    Also from Australia - but I am in South Australia not Tasmania.

    RATS tests here are not meant to be done by people with symptoms - they are meant to be done by asymptomatic people for travel clearance reasons, return to work reasons, screening high risk employees, that sort of thing.

    So if people want a refund on their holiday/flights or sick leave from their employer or unemployment benifits whilst sick etc - they will probably also need a letter from their GP hence reporting to GP to get that.
  • ElioraFR
    ElioraFR Posts: 91 Member
    edited January 8
    I read that because it infects the bronchial tubes more than lower in the lungs that that’s why it is more infectious.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,512 Member
    edited January 9
    @nooshi713
    Huge grateful hugs to you for all you do and are still doing.
    I'm a big believer in finding time for yourself so hope you can do that. Somehow.
    Being right there in the thick of it, I can only imagine how frustrating and maddening it must feel to you. :( I hope things turn around soon, maybe after the big holiday after-affects slow down? IDK. IMO, they're doing too little too late. Meaning so many people and the government, certainly not the caregivers and medical professionals who are using every ounce of courage and energy they can muster.
  • Theoldguy1
    Theoldguy1 Posts: 2,270 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    @tiptoethruthetulips @paperpudding Those are very clear incentives for individuals to report their positive tests. Sounds like a motivating system.

    @AnnPT77 My daughter's boss's teen daughter was sick (turns out it was Lyme disease) and the mom took her to the ER. They both contracted COVID from their time at the ER. So yes, it is good advice to save going to the ER for when that level of medical care is truly needed.

    In December when many in my family had that lousy cold, DD was sick enough that her PCP wanted to run some tests (COVID, Flu & Strep). That PCP's office is associated with a parking garage. Guess where the staff tests patients. Yup, in the parking garage, which is an option most doctors are not lucky enough to be able to offer. :)

    Not being a smart *kitten* but unless they were living in a bubble how do they know they got Covid from the ER?

    Hate to say it, but that stuff is everywhere. Hope they have mild cases.
  • allother94
    allother94 Posts: 588 Member
    nooshi713 wrote: »
    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    Heard a report (NPR news) today about a hospital where they test everyone on arrival, no matter what has brought them to the hospital/ER, no matter whether Covid-symptomatic or not. With the Omicron wave, 1 in 7 people coming into the hospital are testing positive. The test report comes back after they've been in the hospital for a while, if only in the ER.

    Those presenting for other conditions, with no Covid symptoms, have by that time encountered various staff members who are not in full Covid-precautions mode. It's leading to an increase in cases among the staff, usually minor because staff are vaccinated. Even so, staff need to isolate for a minimum of 5 days, so even more staffing shortages are resulting.

    There are a lot of moving parts to all of these systems, and new circumstances cause new complications/problems.

    Another reason to stay away from the ER if you don't truly need to be there is the potential to contract Covid from fellow patients in the ER. Obviously, don't stay away if you have a serious medical problem. It's a balance of risks question.

    Very true! If one doesn’t have Covid then there is a high chance of catching it by coming in. Everyone who has had a potential exposure or respiratory symptoms even if not Covid are lumped together in our Covid tent, because we can’t put them with the general population.

    We are short staffed again tomorrow. It sucks. And patients complain so much about the wait times not realizing we get no breaks, bend over backwards for them, and put our health on the line. This pandemic has really made me lose faith in humanity as a whole.

    My current stance is that hospitals should turn away unvaccinated patients and not offer testing. That should solve the CoVid hospital problem.

    Why don’t hospitals have an online checking and waiting system? I know emergencies are just that, but what good does it do sitting in a room for 10 hours when you can stay at home until you can be seen?