Coronavirus prep

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Replies

  • kshama2001
    kshama2001 Posts: 25,563 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Re air circulation on planes: I am very sensitive to air quality. While it is true that there is great air circulation while the plane is *moving,* when last I flew regularly, 11 years ago, while the plane was on the ground there was a distinct decrease in air quality. Looks like that was still true in 2020:

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/how-clean-is-the-air-on-your-airplane-coronavirus-cvd

    ...That’s why, in addition to good filters, airline cabins also need good passengers. This means everyone onboard should wear a mask.

    That’s both because of masks’ proven protective qualities and the fact that HEPA filters and rapid-air circulation don’t work at max effectiveness until the plane is airborne. This means that the sometimes-interminable period between grabbing your seat and takeoff (or between landing and disembarking) is when you’re most likely to inhale a cloud of air from a person infected with COVID-19.

    That stale, warm air you occasionally notice when a plane is on the ground sitting at the gate or idling might mean there’s little circulation through those filters.

    Your discussion is causing me to remember something from early on in the pandemic. Back in the beginning, weren't they "idling" the plane to keep those filters going? If so, I am not noticing that now.

    I haven't been on a plane since I left FL for good to move back to MA :smiley:
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,053 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    SModa61 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Re air circulation on planes: I am very sensitive to air quality. While it is true that there is great air circulation while the plane is *moving,* when last I flew regularly, 11 years ago, while the plane was on the ground there was a distinct decrease in air quality. Looks like that was still true in 2020:

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/how-clean-is-the-air-on-your-airplane-coronavirus-cvd

    ...That’s why, in addition to good filters, airline cabins also need good passengers. This means everyone onboard should wear a mask.

    That’s both because of masks’ proven protective qualities and the fact that HEPA filters and rapid-air circulation don’t work at max effectiveness until the plane is airborne. This means that the sometimes-interminable period between grabbing your seat and takeoff (or between landing and disembarking) is when you’re most likely to inhale a cloud of air from a person infected with COVID-19.

    That stale, warm air you occasionally notice when a plane is on the ground sitting at the gate or idling might mean there’s little circulation through those filters.

    Your discussion is causing me to remember something from early on in the pandemic. Back in the beginning, weren't they "idling" the plane to keep those filters going? If so, I am not noticing that now.

    I haven't been on a plane since I left FL for good to move back to MA :smiley:

    We're at that age that we are thinking estate planning and Florida is friendlier in that regard. Plus, hubby would fish 365 days a year if he could. :)
  • paperpudding
    paperpudding Posts: 7,525 Member
    I think our Australian rule of 7 days isolation is about right - recently reduced from 10.

    If you are asymptomatic on day 6.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,053 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    SModa61 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    SModa61 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    Re air circulation on planes: I am very sensitive to air quality. While it is true that there is great air circulation while the plane is *moving,* when last I flew regularly, 11 years ago, while the plane was on the ground there was a distinct decrease in air quality. Looks like that was still true in 2020:

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/travel/article/how-clean-is-the-air-on-your-airplane-coronavirus-cvd

    ...That’s why, in addition to good filters, airline cabins also need good passengers. This means everyone onboard should wear a mask.

    That’s both because of masks’ proven protective qualities and the fact that HEPA filters and rapid-air circulation don’t work at max effectiveness until the plane is airborne. This means that the sometimes-interminable period between grabbing your seat and takeoff (or between landing and disembarking) is when you’re most likely to inhale a cloud of air from a person infected with COVID-19.

    That stale, warm air you occasionally notice when a plane is on the ground sitting at the gate or idling might mean there’s little circulation through those filters.

    Your discussion is causing me to remember something from early on in the pandemic. Back in the beginning, weren't they "idling" the plane to keep those filters going? If so, I am not noticing that now.

    I haven't been on a plane since I left FL for good to move back to MA :smiley:

    We're at that age that we are thinking estate planning and Florida is friendlier in that regard. Plus, hubby would fish 365 days a year if he could. :)

    My partner would go to the golf driving range 365 days a year if he could :)

    During lockdown, he bought a net to hit balls in the backyard, and is trying to figure out how heat the barn enough to be able to hit balls into the net out there when it is too cold for the range.

    During the nutty year, we downsized into a townhouse on a golf course. We are on the ninth hole, next to the putting green and driving range. Neither of us golf.......

    good luck with the barn :)
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,356 Member
    SModa61 wrote: »

    During the nutty year, we downsized into a townhouse on a golf course. We are on the ninth hole, next to the putting green and driving range. Neither of us golf.......

    good luck with the barn :)

    My brother lives in Arizona in a beautiful house overlooking a golf course. He and his wife both play golf, but they can't afford to play on the course where they live. Still, it's fun to watch others play.
  • RetiredAndLovingIt
    RetiredAndLovingIt Posts: 1,285 Member
    When our kids were young we lived along the golf course, along one of the longest driving holes. Of course, we had broken windows & got lots of unclaimed golf balls. They had a golf ball stand instead of lemonade, lol.
  • SModa61
    SModa61 Posts: 2,053 Member
    @spiriteagle99 @retiredandlovingit Our unit is an interior unit and behind our cluster is a berm topped with white pines that separates us from the putting green. As for the ninth hole, there is another long group of pines which are trimmed at the bottom to see under, but full at top for rogue balls. Since august when we bought, our unit has not been hit by one ball, but the end unit next to us has as it is not fully behind the pines and exposed to the tee off. As for the driving range, since the driving is not used off season, the cats are loving being harness walked up that hill . There is brush along the sides with lots of exciting critters.
  • AnnPT77
    AnnPT77 Posts: 24,360 Member
    edited January 20
    I posted this link on another thread, but I'm going to repost it here in case it may be helpful to some.

    It's a paper written by medical doctors (with cardiology and sports med credentials), with this aim:
    The primary purpose of this topic is to provide guidance about individual return to play or strenuous activity following infection with COVID-19, with a focus on older adolescent (eg, high school) athletes, recreational and elite adult athletes, tactical personnel, and heavy occupational laborers.

    I was interested primarily because some of my past coaching education still makes me curious about things like that, but I think active people who've recently had Covid (or have active family members who have) might get some usefulness from it.

    https://www.uptodate.com/contents/covid-19-return-to-play-or-strenuous-activity-following-infection#H135764167

    It's written in a dry research study kind of way, not like a lively journalistic report, but it's not super-technical IMO beyond that, so should be accessible.
  • ahoy_m8
    ahoy_m8 Posts: 2,774 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    oocdc2 wrote: »
    After almost three years of being *so* gods-damn careful, I've got Omnicron. I'm vaxxed and boosted; I have mild symptoms and just tired all the time. My workplace mandates isolation for five days, complete masking for five when reporting to work; no negative test required. I hope my kids (also vaxxed, one boosted) can manage to avoid this.

    Nobody is going to avoid Omicron unless they literally do absolutely nothing and have no contact with anyone. My whole family had it earlier this month and I'm still in quarantine for work due to their very strict protocols. We're all vaxed and my wife and I are boosted. We have indoor mask mandates here and always comply and we all still got it.

    Sorry if you already answered this, but having been so conscientious, can you narrow down your/your kids' possible exposures?
  • SuzySunshine99
    SuzySunshine99 Posts: 2,709 Member
    For those in the U.S., have you ordered your free test kits from the government yet?
    We'll see how long they take to arrive...it is through the U.S. Postal Service, after all...
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,116 Member
    edited January 20

    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    oocdc2 wrote: »
    After almost three years of being *so* gods-damn careful, I've got Omnicron. I'm vaxxed and boosted; I have mild symptoms and just tired all the time. My workplace mandates isolation for five days, complete masking for five when reporting to work; no negative test required. I hope my kids (also vaxxed, one boosted) can manage to avoid this.

    Nobody is going to avoid Omicron unless they literally do absolutely nothing and have no contact with anyone. My whole family had it earlier this month and I'm still in quarantine for work due to their very strict protocols. We're all vaxed and my wife and I are boosted. We have indoor mask mandates here and always comply and we all still got it.

    I thought that too but somehow managed to avoid getting it when my family had it. I wish I did test positive, at this point I just want to get it over with. Given my extensive exposures I am assuming that I am immune due to either previous exposure or vaccine response. I just wish I had that confirmation of being post infection so I can get on with normal life and go on a freaking vacation without worrying about getting stuck there with a positive test.
  • 33gail33
    33gail33 Posts: 1,116 Member
    I'm going to a wake tomorrow, and find myself pretty anxious about it. I'm going to double-mask and not stay very long, but funerals/wakes tend to be super-spreader events.

    My husband and I are vaxxed/boosted, but we still do not want even a mild case.

    If I test positive, I'm out of work for a minimum of 5 days. This is an extremely busy time at my job, and what I can do from home is limited. It would be a burden on my co-workers if I were not there.

    My husband is a freelancer/contractor. If he tests positive, he is also out of work, but he would not get paid for his lost time, so it's a financial burden for us if he doesn't work.

    Honestly at this point given how obiquitous it is I would just not test and keep on doing what I needed to do.
  • ReenieHJ
    ReenieHJ Posts: 9,357 Member
    For those in the U.S., have you ordered your free test kits from the government yet?
    We'll see how long they take to arrive...it is through the U.S. Postal Service, after all...

    My sister got hers and it only took a few days. Plus she said it has a years expiration date. I picked some up from the state police a few weeks ago; they'll get us through until April then they expire so will have to look into getting more then.