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WOMEN AGES 50+ FOR MAY 2020

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  • JaxsgmaJaxsgma Member Posts: 51 Member Member Posts: 51 Member
    kevrit wrote: »
    ny7d5zwxw8l0.jpeg
    c1dk3pixf7gc.jpeg

    This hat is adorable, you do such a great job.

  • JaxsgmaJaxsgma Member Posts: 51 Member Member Posts: 51 Member
    Good Morning ladies, Day of 11 on my journey to weight loss, doing great, weighing myself on Tuesdays so not to get discouraged, but Ive been doing really well, and I am anxious for Tuesday to get here.

    I am trying liquid egg whites today, not bad, so I am having two today along with my herbal tea as I sit out on my patio. Beautiful day, going into the high 70's, so I get out today and do some walking.

    Everyone have a great day. :)
  • Katla49Katla49 Member Posts: 6,641 Member Member Posts: 6,641 Member
    Machka: I had acrylic nails for several years. I wouldn’t recommend it. My own nails underneath got thinner and thinner. I quit having manicures and stopped the acrylic nails when I realized how thin my own underlying nails had become. It has taken a long time, but my nails have improved. I have one flawed nail. I damaged it as a young child and it can split. That situation has improved but will never be perfect. I have been cutting my own bangs since the Covid 19 lockdown and letting the rest grow. At the moment, I’m happy with my hair. I retired after 20 years of teaching. My last assignment was 8th grade Social Studies. The curriculum was US history from prehistory through the Civil War plus a unit on economics. :star:

    Kate UK: I hope that things work out in your daughter’s favor. Keeping my fingers crossed for her. :flowerforyou:

    Lisa: You seem happier. Your paintings are gorgeous! :flowerforyou:

    BeUncommon: Things do seem to be loosening up somewhat. Each state does its own decision making. Our governor has allowed hair salons to open but only so many people at a time can go in and they have to wait at the door to be let in. DH will be going in for a trim this week. I saw a line a block long to go into a bar. A maximum of 5 people inside was allowed at a time. :ohwell:

    Pip: I hope your retirement plans eventually work out. :star:


    My son would like us to visit him in VA. At this point I’ve said no, but I’m trying to think up reasonable possibilities. DH & I will need to talk things over. He refuses to fly & didn’t do well home alone when I went to see my daughter last fall. Perhaps he could stay at his sister’s place in our RV while I travel. She has offered in the past. I think changes in the Covid 19 situation will gradually reveal what is doable and what isn’t.

    Katla in Beautiful NW Oregon
  • JRsLateInLifeMomJRsLateInLifeMom Member Posts: 2,102 Member Member Posts: 2,102 Member
    Tracey- Glad to hear that! I’ve never kept hand sanitizer in the car grew up in hot areas even the desert 🌵 so we didn’t even leave water in the car or foods cause you can cook in your car. Wonder why the fire department lied 🤥? That puts others in danger of not carrying the sanitizer who’s most vulnerable.
    Luckily my fire department has been in the very front lines caring for Covid patients they are yelling wear masks to be careful with the Doctors y nurses here. One nurse hangs a sign in her balcony that says GO Home I’m tired lol She’s a very young mean nurse to begin with but finally I can agree with miss crab Apple.

    Amber Tx

    Exercising lightly today. Eating right amount of calories. Watching Hulu
  • pipcd34pipcd34 Member Posts: 10,742 Member Member Posts: 10,742 Member
  • TerriRichardson112TerriRichardson112 Member Posts: 9,096 Member Member Posts: 9,096 Member
  • KetoneKarenKetoneKaren Member Posts: 4,583 Member Member Posts: 4,583 Member


    About habitual bingeing:
    I've been doing a lot of introspection and self-analysis of my eating after supper, often bordering on binging. I ran across Marc Lewis, PhD, who wrote "The Biology of Desire" about how and why our brains function with addiction which includes eating disorders. He has several good presentations on YouTube.

    I watched this twice: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=aOSD9rTVuWc&t=1106s and even took notes.

    I thought it was fascinating. He explains how the different parts of the brain interact with habit formation. So the addicted brain acts the same during drug/alcohol abuse or binging on food, the internet, sex, porn, even falling in love. It sets up a cycle which pumps out dopamine despite harm to the person and their health and relationships.

    While I don't consider this night time binging true addiction, there are many aspects that fit.

    I could write pages, and will post more this week. I have ordered his book from the library - I checked it out on Amazon and the "take a look" feature actually gives a lot of information if anyone is interested.

    Lanette
    SW WA State

    >>>

    Lanette, I am very interested in this topic.
    This is the limbic system:
    6gvzgv36ydrc.png

    I am particularly interested in the pharmacology of the limbic system.

    In particular, a prescription medication called naltrexone blocks opiate receptors on the brain. This action reduces or eliminates pleasure from taking opiates, but it also reduces pleasure from drinking alcohol, smoking cigarettes, and eating. It is effective in doses as low as 6.25mg/day, and either alone or in combination with other medications (Wellbutrin, for example), it can make a phenomenal difference in the "food thinking" and bingeing compulsion that many overweight people struggle with on a daily basis.

    It is nearly impossible for people with this biologically-governed drive or compulsion to resist food's siren song…sooner or later, people just get worn down by the obsessions and engage in the compulsive (binge) behavior. I have this problem, and so do some other women on this thread.

    I think I may start taking naltrexone at a very low dosage; I took it several years ago, and it did reduce "food thinking". I felt that it gave me distance from the eating compulsion, allowing me to see it more objectively and less in the "emotionally-deprived/I don't give a *kitten* I'm going to eat" mindset. There are other factors (HALT) that factor in to the inability to redirect one's thoughts when faced with an urge to eat, but most people, with practice and good strategies, can minimize those traps. Unfortunately, for people with addictive limbic systems, strategizing is simply not enough.

    There is a judgmental mindset that exists that says that those of us who have this problem are weak-willed, lazy, noncompliant, or poor strategizers. To add insult to injury, many of us who have this type of brain buy in, as if people who do not have this hard-wiring somehow know us better than we know ourselves. It is a form of abuse. Unfortunately, many doctors still have this mindset, unconscionable in this day and age.
    edited May 23
  • KetoneKarenKetoneKaren Member Posts: 4,583 Member Member Posts: 4,583 Member
    PIP Will you and Kirby live in the Airstream?
    .
  • BeUncommonBeUncommon Member, Premium Posts: 98 Member Member, Premium Posts: 98 Member
    Barbie > Thank you hun xx

    Jaxsgma > Enjoy your day and I hear you with feeling anxious, I do as well and I weigh in on Sundays :) You are doing great!! Keep up the good work!!

    Katla > I don't think it will ever go back to the normal we are used to. I think Covid has changed alot of things and I think we will have to get into a new type of normal.

    Tried these barenaked noodles yesterday that I got at muscle foods. They were a bit rubbery and not much flavour but filling. I think I need to prepare them differently next time to add more flavour.. maybe some chicken stalk or some soy sauce or something. Good as a filler and there is next to no calories or carbs in it!! lol.. it is kind of like chewing on a rubber band but with some flavouring it could at least be a flavourful rubber band!! lol

    love Tonya UK xx
  • Katla49Katla49 Member Posts: 6,641 Member Member Posts: 6,641 Member
    Tonya UK: Things are in flux, and I have no idea how long it will take to reach a new normal. I am confident we’ll eventually get there but I wonder what will be new and what will be life as we knew it before the pandemic.
  • lilliangonzalez45lilliangonzalez45 Member Posts: 4 Member Member Posts: 4 Member
    Hello there. Thank you I do have lots of stress looking for healthy new lifestyle habits. To stay focus on my goal better version of my self. Good luck to you!!
  • Snowflake1968Snowflake1968 Member Posts: 4,323 Member Member Posts: 4,323 Member
    Amber - from what I read it was one of those posts that started somehow got spread as fast as the disease. Snopes has a whole article on it.
  • 1948Peachy1948Peachy Member Posts: 1,328 Member Member Posts: 1,328 Member
  • KetoneKarenKetoneKaren Member Posts: 4,583 Member Member Posts: 4,583 Member
    BeUncommon wrote: »
    Barbie > Thank you hun xx

    Jaxsgma > Enjoy your day and I hear you with feeling anxious, I do as well and I weigh in on Sundays :) You are doing great!! Keep up the good work!!

    Katla > I don't think it will ever go back to the normal we are used to. I think Covid has changed alot of things and I think we will have to get into a new type of normal.

    Tried these barenaked noodles yesterday that I got at muscle foods. They were a bit rubbery and not much flavour but filling. I think I need to prepare them differently next time to add more flavour.. maybe some chicken stalk or some soy sauce or something. Good as a filler and there is next to no calories or carbs in it!! lol.. it is kind of like chewing on a rubber band but with some flavouring it could at least be a flavourful rubber band!! lol

    love Tonya UK xx

    Tonya, I think, for people who use Shirataki noodles, that Miracle Noodles and Zero Noodles are more palatable than Barenaked Noodles, but they are all somewhat rubbery. They are best well-rinsed (really well-rinsed), panfried to an almost dry consistency, and spiced up with ginger, garlic, chili powder, soy sauce, sesame oil, etc. I don't care for them, and much prefer zoodles or other vegetable noodles as a pasta substitute. If I recall correctly, Rebecca is a Shirataki noodle expert.

    Karen in Virginia
  • BeUncommonBeUncommon Member, Premium Posts: 98 Member Member, Premium Posts: 98 Member
    Katla > I am curious as well what it will be like.

    Karen > Thank you for the information, I have 3 more packs of these barenaked noodles I will finish but definitely will try the shirataki noodles.. I have never tried the zoodles either. I think I might give that a try as well.. There are ones made out of butternut squash right? I do like squash...

    Tonya UK
    8dizrmjn0l5k.jpg
  • kevritkevrit Member, Premium Posts: 1,697 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,697 Member
    Thanks for all the comments on the hat! I learned how to sew at a very early age. First thing I learned was how to rip seams without tearing the cloth. My uncle who is 12 years older than me was doing tailoring as a teen and went on to become a full fledged tailor who retired two years ago at 72 years old. Between him and my grandmothers, sewing, knitting, crocheting and became second nature to me. Never could get the hand of braiding rugs though. My paternal grandmother and uncle would give fabric scraps to my maternal grandmother who made quilts or braided rugs with the scraps. In high school home ec, every year the class would make doll clothes to be displayed in a store front. I was chosen to make the wedding dress for the doll. With my uncle’s guidance and professional sewing machine, I made it and remember it came out beautifully. The store would then donate the dolls.

    Long story short, I have seen off and on all my life but been a while since I made something complicated like the hat!

    RV Rita
  • pipcd34pipcd34 Member Posts: 10,742 Member Member Posts: 10,742 Member
    PIP Will you and Kirby live in the Airstream?
    .

    The ORIGINAL INTENT was a yurt. then we got the airstream, NOW it's an apartment. there were road blocks on the 1st two thoughts.
  • SophieRosieMomSophieRosieMom Member, Premium Posts: 1,930 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,930 Member


    About habitual bingeing:
    I've been doing a lot of introspection and self-analysis of my eating after supper, often bordering on binging. I ran across Marc Lewis, PhD, who wrote "The Biology of Desire" about how and why our brains function with addiction which includes eating disorders. He has several good presentations on YouTube.

    I watched this twice: https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=aOSD9rTVuWc&t=1106s and even took notes.

    I thought it was fascinating. He explains how the different parts of the brain interact with habit formation. So the addicted brain acts the same during drug/alcohol abuse or binging on food, the internet, sex, porn, even falling in love. It sets up a cycle which pumps out dopamine despite harm to the person and their health and relationships.

    While I don't consider this night time binging true addiction, there are many aspects that fit.

    I could write pages, and will post more this week. I have ordered his book from the library - I checked it out on Amazon and the "take a look" feature actually gives a lot of information if anyone is interested.

    Lanette
    SW WA State

    >>>

    Lanette, I am very interested in this topic.
    This is the limbic system:
    6gvzgv36ydrc.png

    I am particularly interested in the pharmacology of the limbic system.

    In particular, a prescription medication called naltrexone blocks opiate receptors on the brain. This action reduces or eliminates pleasure from taking opiates, but it also reduces pleasure from drinking alcohol, smoking cigarettes, and eating. It is effective in doses as low as 6.25mg/day, and either alone or in combination with other medications (Wellbutrin, for example), it can make a phenomenal difference in the "food thinking" and bingeing compulsion that many overweight people struggle with on a daily basis.

    It is nearly impossible for people with this biologically-governed drive or compulsion to resist food's siren song…sooner or later, people just get worn down by the obsessions and engage in the compulsive (binge) behavior. I have this problem, and so do some other women on this thread.

    I think I may start taking naltrexone at a very low dosage; I took it several years ago, and it did reduce "food thinking". I felt that it gave me distance from the eating compulsion, allowing me to see it more objectively and less in the "emotionally-deprived/I don't give a *kitten* I'm going to eat" mindset. There are other factors (HALT) that factor in to the inability to redirect one's thoughts when faced with an urge to eat, but most people, with practice and good strategies, can minimize those traps. Unfortunately, for people with addictive limbic systems, strategizing is simply not enough.

    There is a judgmental mindset that exists that says that those of us who have this problem are weak-willed, lazy, noncompliant, or poor strategizers. To add insult to injury, many of us who have this type of brain buy in, as if people who do not have this hard-wiring somehow know us better than we know ourselves. It is a form of abuse. Unfortunately, many doctors still have this mindset, unconscionable in this day and age.

    Karen - I was hoping you'd weigh in on this.
    I understand what you just wrote about the opiate receptors. From what I can tell, Lewis uses a different brain model involving the prefrontal cortex, the hippocampus and the striatum.

    These might just be different names for parts of the brain in your illustration.

    I was able to copy and paste a couple of his Powerpoints but cannot get them to convert from a Word document into a JPG format to post here. (Machka or anyone...tips? I can convert to PDF but MFP won't take it.) If I can get them posted, it will illustrate his theory.

    Anyhow, back to binging. Why binge and why now and what to do about it, right?

    Would naltrexone help a person overcome the urge to binge specifically at night? With eating throughout the day normal portions, well balanced. 6:00 pm is the witching hour and here she comes with Twinkies, chips, and candy bars.

    What really sparked my interest in this was how addictive behavior is characterized by going for the immediate reward instead of the future reward, and how it relates to binging and intermittent fasting which is just that - delay eating now, with the reward of eating what I want later. Delay, don't deny.

    IF works for me until too many stressors take hold - fear, loss of control (thanks to the virus stuff 24/7) everywhere we look. UGH!!

    So the challenge is to come up with some achievable, real future rewards that maybe don't involve eating. Gardening helps - thanks Barbara!

    More to ponder. Thanks again for your feedback.

    Lanette
    SW WA State





  • cityjaneLondoncityjaneLondon Member Posts: 7,464 Member Member Posts: 7,464 Member
    Lanette - I've noticed before that you eat your last meal of the day really early. I'd be hungry if I did that. We eat the main course at 6.15, dessert at 7.45, cheese st 8.15 and a small piece of dark chocolate around 8.45. That way I don't go to bed hungry and I've got something to look forward to most of the evening. It feels as if I am having 4 courses! :D
    I've also noticed you mentioning the snack cupboard. Why do you have one of those? We don't keep chips, chocolate bars, candies, ice cream, in the house. I do buy dark chocolate and ration it out. If you don't buy it, you can't eat it.
    Plus I have to pay for my food with my exercise.
    I am just as much of a food addict as you, but I have worked my way round it.
    As I understand it, you are not overweight, so it's more a question of you feeling in control. Eat well, eat better. Always have real meals that satisfy you. And keep that stuff away! It's poison.

    Love Heather UK xxxxxxxx
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