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Is adding volume a good substitute to adding more weight?

frankiewintheiserfrankiewintheiser Member Posts: 1 Member Member Posts: 1 Member
I recently started the Fierce 5 full body dumbbell plan after doing a homemade bro split routine, only problem is my limit to weight at home. For example, I do DB press for my chest but the weight isn't nearly enough anymore for 3x8. It feels like one exercise for each body part isnt enough. Could I keep the same program going, but add 1-2 sets to eat exercise to keep my progression going? I initially wanted to replace the workout with something more difficult, like flys, but that would probably ruin the program.

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  • sgt1372sgt1372 Member Posts: 3,595 Member Member Posts: 3,595 Member
    If your goal is increasing strength, unfortunately the answer is no.

    In general, more reps 4 endurance and more wt 4 strength. So, in order to get stronger, you need to continually add more wt. There is a point of diminshing returns but it doesn't seem like you are snyehere near there yet.
    edited July 30
  • sijomialsijomial Member Posts: 16,718 Member Member Posts: 16,718 Member
    Do you mean progression in terms of strength or hypertrophy as your main goal?

    Yes you can achieve hypertrophy over a very wide range of weights/reps/volume.
    Strength (in low rep terms, as opposed to strength endurance) not so much.

    The ideal solution is to get appropropriate weights for your capability of course.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,437 Member Member Posts: 8,437 Member
    I recently started the Fierce 5 full body dumbbell plan after doing a homemade bro split routine, only problem is my limit to weight at home. For example, I do DB press for my chest but the weight isn't nearly enough anymore for 3x8. It feels like one exercise for each body part isnt enough. Could I keep the same program going, but add 1-2 sets to eat exercise to keep my progression going? I initially wanted to replace the workout with something more difficult, like flys, but that would probably ruin the program.

    Absolutely as long as proper load management is in place.

    Increasing volume is a staple of strength gains if done wisely.

    With dumbbells it's a bit trickier, but is only limited by the program or creativness of the individual.

    I encourage you to continue seeking ways to progressive overload.👍.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,437 Member Member Posts: 8,437 Member
    sijomial wrote: »
    Do you mean progression in terms of strength or hypertrophy as your main goal?

    Yes you can achieve hypertrophy over a very wide range of weights/reps/volume.
    Strength (in low rep terms, as opposed to strength endurance) not so much.


    The ideal solution is to get appropropriate weights for your capability of course.

    Yes and no.

    You can achieve hypertrophy in wide variety of rep ranges.

    You can achieve strength in a wide variety as well. It depends on the definition of strength by the individual.

    Some people such as competitive lifters display strength with one rep on a platform.

    Some other people will display strength with higher reps in a gym setting.

    It certainly possible to gain and display strength in any rep scheme. We just have to define strength to our goal.
    edited July 30
  • Justin_7272Justin_7272 Member Posts: 248 Member Member Posts: 248 Member
    I think the question is phrased as - Will lifting 100lbs 8 times or 800lbs once produce different results?

    Results being either hypertrophy and/or strength. Hypertrophy being muscle size, strength being ability to lift more moving forward.

    Hypertrophy is fairly easy to define - literal larger muscle size.

    Strength is a fickler subject, but I'd posit it's 1RM (an easy calculation).

    From my understanding, to maximize both you want to lift within an 8-12 rep range. Outside that, you're looking at either hitting 1RM PRs at the expense of injury, or spinning your wheels at 15+ reps.

    For OP - find a different program that works for you and what you have, or buy more weights.
  • OnedaywriterOnedaywriter Member Posts: 136 Member Member Posts: 136 Member
    I’m not familiar with your program but an imperfect but cheap and easy way to add some resistance and keep what you have- add a resistance band to the dumbells. Works OK for presses,rows, deadlifts etc. - doesn’t work well for some movements though
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Member Posts: 8,437 Member Member Posts: 8,437 Member
    I think the question is phrased as - Will lifting 100lbs 8 times or 800lbs once produce different results?
    No that would be tonnage and the OP is asking specifically about volume increases. Weight is not calculated in volume.

    Tonnage= weight lifted
    100 x 8= 800 tonnage
    1 x 800= 800 tonnage

    Volume= sets x reps
    100 x 8= 1 set of 8 reps= volume 8
    1 x 800= 1 set of 1 reps= volume 1

    We can see that there is 8 times the volume comparing the two sets even though they have the exact same tonnage. So yes increasing volume at the appropriate intensity can and is a very good strategy.
    From my understanding, to maximize both you want to lift within an 8-12 rep range.

    It is highly individualized. If you want optimal results, we look at the individual's response. Some people respond to higher intensity training better than lower intensity and vise versa and there is plenty of middle ground.

    If we are talking in general, I'd argue the current evidence suggests that a wide variety of anywhere between 4-20 reps can produce optimal results if programmed correctly for individuals in either hypertrophy or strength goals.





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