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Food storage methods that surprised you.

senalay788senalay788 Member Posts: 136 Member Member Posts: 136 Member
For me was Tahini for example. Most all jars never mention to store in a fridge once opened. But if you think about what this is, its ground up seeds, think natural peanut butter. So it will go rancid if there are no additives. Only after reading about this more, I now store it in the fridge.

What surprised you?
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Replies

  • LietchiLietchi Member Posts: 1,293 Member Member Posts: 1,293 Member
    That eggs don't need to be stored in the fridge, unless they have been washed (washing destroys a protective layer on the eggs) or unless they have already stored in a fridge.

    So eggs here in Belgium for example don't need to be stored in the fridge, but eggs in the US usually do since eggs are usually washed there.
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 6,131 Member Member Posts: 6,131 Member
    my parents always kept butter in a dish in the pantry and never any problems.

    Interesting trivia - bottles of tomato sauce (ketchup to americans) say on bottle to refridgerate after opening.
    - apparently put on there by manufacturer so it is in your face when you open fridge instead of tucked away on back of your pantry shelf and therefore you use more.


    Maybe that is an urban myth - but, like most people I have never refriderated it and it keeps fine in the pantry
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,389 Member Member Posts: 8,389 Member
    This doesn't surprise me, because we didn't keep it in the fridge when I grew up, but it may surprise some of you: commercial mayonnaise does not need to be refrigerated after opening (but only use clean utensils -- you don't want to get bits of other food that will spoil in it).

    I refrigerate it now because I think it tastes a bit better cold, plus I hardly ever use it because there are only a very few things I like it in, and even the smallest jar will usually last me long enough (I'm talking years) that it will begin to separate even in the refrigerator.
  • ChristopherLimogesChristopherLimoges Member Posts: 284 Member Member Posts: 284 Member
    Pickling. 😯
  • acpgeeacpgee Member Posts: 5,375 Member Member Posts: 5,375 Member
    I finely slice ginger against the grain and then blitz in the food processor and freeze in silicon ice cube trays, transfering into ziplock bags once frozen. I do the same with galangal. I need to label the bags because galangal and ginger look really alike once frozen.

    It surprises me that people could keep duck confit for quite some time before refrigeration. But I guess the salting cures it much like a ham.
  • senalay788senalay788 Member Posts: 136 Member Member Posts: 136 Member
    Pickling. 😯

    Preserving....... whole different topic.
  • springlering62springlering62 Member, Premium Posts: 1,508 Member Member, Premium Posts: 1,508 Member
    Butter bells. Who knew. Brilliant.
  • tracybear86tracybear86 Member Posts: 145 Member Member Posts: 145 Member
    Wrapping celery bunches in tin foil keeps them fresh and crisp for a surprisingly long period of time!
  • girlwithcurls2girlwithcurls2 Member Posts: 1,980 Member Member Posts: 1,980 Member
    Butter bells. Who knew. Brilliant.

    I swear by mine :)

    And being back in the US, I hate taking up fridge real estate with eggs. I'm used to having them on a shelf.
    I have a neighbor with a bay laurel and she let me pick loads of fresh bay leaves. She told me to freeze them in a ZipLoc. I don't know if it's necessary, but I did it.
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 16,809 Member Member, Premium Posts: 16,809 Member
    Storing ginger roots in the freezer and grating while frozen, which is actually easier. I don’t bother peeling, but you can easily scrape the skin away while frozen too.

    Agreed. But - and I know this isn't on point to the thread topic - putting the chunks in dry sherry is also a good thing. Grate or chop the chunks as needed, peel or don't before putting in the sherry . . . then use the sherry in cooking. To me, that's a win all the way around.

    More on topic: People used to keep sauerkraut (just cabbage and salt) in crocks for months, and likewise with fermented pickles of many sorts. The good-keeper Winter squash will hold longer if you dip them in bleach water, let them fully dry, and store them in a cool place. There are lots of traditional tricks associated with root cellars and gardening, that our subsistence-farming forebears found routine, but we've lost: Belgian endive buried in sawdust to blanch, various root crops left in the ground with mulch to keep them diggable long into the Winter, etc. People used to preserve whole eggs in isinglass for *long* periods, and that hasn't stopped working, we've just stopped doing it..
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,389 Member Member Posts: 8,389 Member
    Butter doesn't need to be refrigerated. We keep ours in a butter dish on the counter. Definitely makes it easier to spread.

    Just wanted to say that salted butter will keep better out of the refrigerator than unsalted.
  • senalay788senalay788 Member Posts: 136 Member Member Posts: 136 Member
    Butter doesn't need to be refrigerated. We keep ours in a butter dish on the counter. Definitely makes it easier to spread.

    Just wanted to say that salted butter will keep better out of the refrigerator than unsalted.

    So question, since butter is really NOT worth the calories for me at all, so I dont have much experience. How long can you keep butter out before it goes rancid? And I mean pure butter, but butter products.
    edited October 18
  • wilson10102018wilson10102018 Member Posts: 798 Member Member Posts: 798 Member
    Butter is a great product. Relatively low in calories for its use in saute. A tbsp has 100 calories and is more than enough to saute 2 servings of raw shrimp and the pasta it is served on. And, nothing will carmelize scallops or salmon sauteed like a little butter. 1 pat (.5 tbsp) per salmon steak.
    edited October 18
  • senalay788senalay788 Member Posts: 136 Member Member Posts: 136 Member
    Butter is a great product. Relatively low in calories for its use in saute. A tbsp has 100 calories and is more than enough to saute 2 servings of raw shrimp and the pasta it is served on. And, nothing will carmelize scallops or salmon sauteed like a little butter. 1 pat (.5 tbsp) per salmon steak.

    There is just soooooo much wrong with what you just wrote that....... well........ yea.
    And I see im not the only who disagrees with that.
  • dewd2dewd2 Member Posts: 2,406 Member Member Posts: 2,406 Member
    senalay788 wrote: »
    Butter is a great product. Relatively low in calories for its use in saute. A tbsp has 100 calories and is more than enough to saute 2 servings of raw shrimp and the pasta it is served on. And, nothing will carmelize scallops or salmon sauteed like a little butter. 1 pat (.5 tbsp) per salmon steak.

    There is just soooooo much wrong with what you just wrote that....... well........ yea.
    And I see im not the only who disagrees with that.

    Why?
  • paperpuddingpaperpudding Member Posts: 6,131 Member Member Posts: 6,131 Member
    senalay788 wrote: »
    Butter is a great product. Relatively low in calories for its use in saute. A tbsp has 100 calories and is more than enough to saute 2 servings of raw shrimp and the pasta it is served on. And, nothing will carmelize scallops or salmon sauteed like a little butter. 1 pat (.5 tbsp) per salmon steak.

    There is just soooooo much wrong with what you just wrote that....... well........ yea.
    And I see im not the only who disagrees with that.

    well there is one disagree - but there is one or two disagrees on lots of random posts so that doesn't say much.

    What exactly is wrong with Wilson's post about butter?? (nothing I can see)
  • lynn_glenmontlynn_glenmont Member Posts: 8,389 Member Member Posts: 8,389 Member
    senalay788 wrote: »
    Butter doesn't need to be refrigerated. We keep ours in a butter dish on the counter. Definitely makes it easier to spread.

    Just wanted to say that salted butter will keep better out of the refrigerator than unsalted.

    So question, since butter is really NOT worth the calories for me at all, so I dont have much experience. How long can you keep butter out before it goes rancid? And I mean pure butter, but butter products.

    I dunno. I tend to only leave it out when I expect to be using it nearly every day (i.e., in fresh corn season, or when I've made or bought a loaf of bread that I plan to eat as buttered bread or toast until it's gone). I'm sure I've had salted butter out on the counter (in a covered butter dish) for close to two weeks without it going rancid. Of course, if it's just me, I usually leave it in the wrapper as well as the covered butter dish. And I don't leave it on a part of the counter where the sun will shine directly on it.
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