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1980s definatly, and back..Why were people more fit, toned and healthy Looking?

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Replies

  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 40,112 Member
    Motorsheen wrote: »
    I have absolutely nothing of value to contribute to this thread. (or much anywhere else.)

    I was just looking for an excuse to post this gif.

    It somehow makes sense here..... maybe.

    giphy.gif?cid=ecf05e4753fffmgpd8ro23fuc6cqgs5d67ndd3ky40u8rcqe&rid=giphy.gif&ct=g



    .

    My mom was super into Richard Simmons...

    AgonizingTiredFantail-max-1mb.gif
  • NVintage
    NVintage Posts: 1,416 Member
    This one is the best workout video from the 80s!:)

  • wunderkindking
    wunderkindking Posts: 1,516 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    On what planet would Kate Upton be considered obese?

    032b3ea3cc51803fa78e38c09a21b456w-c1026572187xd-w826_h860_q80.jpg

    Planet Hollywood and Distorted Body Image, maybe ED.

    Seriously she apparently gained some weight. She never made it NEAR an overweight BMI, much less an obese one.
  • cymande1961
    cymande1961 Posts: 44 Member
    edited June 2021
    Answering the original question - yes, folks were thinner in the 70's and 80's. But all you have to do is look at a few differences in how people lived: (a) meals prepared by others -- fast food in particular -- were way smaller than they are now; today, a much bigger percentage of people's meals are prepared by others outside the home and we have become accustomed to those larger sizes as "normal" portions at the same time as folks are less physically active in the hours they aren't working; (b) children being expected to go outside to play and be active every day, or having PE at school every day, used to be the default, but that ended as folks started believing in the myth that children have to be constantly "achieving" or "preparing" or "competing" academically and the equally destructive myth that it is far more dangerous for children to be left to their own devices outside; (c) no 24 hour anything, so people both had less access to unhealthy things around the clock AND got more meaningful sleep - which of course is tied to exercise; and (d) the levels of stress and anxiety were far far less in most people than they are now, in which insecurity about everything from job to relationship is a virtual constant for many people and contributes to things like stress eating in a world where getting counseling or therapy to help manage stress and anxiety is completely dependent on having money or good-enough insurance. All of those things factor into the equation, IMO.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,764 Member
    JessD9031 wrote: »
    JessD9031 wrote: »
    Back in the day, actors, actresses, models, etc were forced to work out and bein shape to get and keep their jobs.

    Today, political correctness means that we have to celebrate fat people. You see, there are more fat people to sell to than fit people, and we would certainly not want to "hurt anyone's feelings" by putting someone healthy and fit out into the public eye. Fattie Mae might break down and eat all the donuts.

    Just my 2 cents worth.

    Oh yes, the days of forced anorexia to keep your job was much better! And long gone, too! Nowadays, you never see an underweight model, right? Amirite?

    Are you really suggesting that there is no longer any pressure on actors, models, media personalities, etc, to be thin? Are you being serious when you say that "fat people" are now preferred in these professions?

    Two words.

    Kate

    Upton

    Very beautiful young lady. If you took a measure of her body fat content, she would be considered obese. Nothing whatsoever fit about her. And she is not the only one.

    https://swimsuit.si.com/news/kate-upton-si-swimsuit-2017-cover

    Having lived in the '80s, I think plenty of people would have liked to see her in a swimsuit on SI back then too.
  • lemurcat2
    lemurcat2 Posts: 7,764 Member
    JessD9031 wrote: »
    JessD9031 wrote: »
    I don’t agree at all Jess, people don’t even know what a healthy body looks like even now, people were tearing apart Camila Cabello for being overweight and disgusting recently when she’s almost certainly at a healthy weight (I’m underweight and only a little thinner than her). The “healthy and fit” perfect woman of the moment usually shows up in a documentary a few years later talking about their eating disorder and how miserable they were at the time 😕. Even so, it’s not political correctness gone mad to also show representation for the majority of people instead of pretending thin bodies are the only ones which exist

    I am not talking about a representation, I am talking about "fit shaming". Fat shaming used to be status quo, and it was wrong. But now, it seems like people are shamed for wanting to be fit, because it makes the fat people feel bad about themselves. I have nothing against anyone, regardless of their size. That being said, I am tired of being criticized for being in shape, and wanting to stay that way. If someone loves themselves the way they are, good on them. But don't tell me that I make someone else self conscious because I work my *kitten* off to stay healthy and in shape. If they don't want a reminder of how they look, they can do something about it. Its not my job to make them feel good about themselves. And it is not society's job either. People need to take whatever steps that they need to take in order to feel good about themselves.

    Disclaimer: that is my opinion, and I am fully aware that having an opinion does not necessarily make me right.

    Does "fit shaming" really exist anywhere except on social media? I have never, ever experienced this, but I'm not on Facebook or any of that crap. Where are you being shamed for being fit?

    The reality is that being fit is still preferred in our society. Overweight/obese people are less likely to be hired, earn less money, and are passed over for promotions.

    I'm sorry, but fat shaming still IS the status quo.

    WE will have to agree to disagree.

    I've been slender since 2015. I guess this is the sort of thing that will vary according to your social circle and family structure, but I've never gotten any criticism for being slender or regularly exercising, while I know it's routine for obese people to get all sorts of unwanted criticism and comments on their weight.

    Does it happen? I mean, all sorts of unusual things happen in the world, so I'm not going to say it never happens.

    But it's not like the tables have flipped and slender people are now the victims.

    Yes, this is my experience too.
  • cwolfman13
    cwolfman13 Posts: 40,112 Member
    edited June 2021
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.

    I'm pretty sure my 80s experience...at least most of the 80s is probably pretty skewed relative to many other people.

    There were a lot of things I didn't really get much of like snack type food, sodas, etc and eating out was usually Sunday after church a couple times per month maybe. This is most likely because we were broke AF. I was always jealous of my friends who had pop-tarts and fruit roll-ups and such in their school lunches and I had a bologna sandwich some saltine crackers and an apple, banana, or grapes. I remember in first grade I desperately wanted to have a birthday at McDonalds and my dad just thought that was too expensive so he had a few of my friends over and just grilled burgers in the back yard.

    My parents were also kinda crazy religious for a good chunk of my childhood. We had a t.v., but no cable...my parents though cable television was about as close to hell fire and brimstone as you could possibly get without actually entering Satan's lair. I also was growing up in a very small town in the middle of BFE Nebraska. No video games or gaming consoles until Nintendo came out...and then my dad decided video games were ok, but he bought a friggin' Atari 7800 instead of the NES.

    My parents also figured out early on that both me and my sister were pretty good athletes...track and field for me and gymnastics for my sister. They pushed us really hard and really thought that was going to be our ticket. Sometimes it felt like my life back then was pretty much church, school, study, track...rinse and repeat year after year. I quit after my junior year in high school because I was completely burned out on it...so yeah, no college scholarship for me.
  • Motorsheen
    Motorsheen Posts: 20,243 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Theoldguy1 wrote: »
    MsCzar wrote: »
    I was
    So, so many snacks.

    Having an afternoon snack right after school was a solid tradition. We lived near a Hostess Bakery outlet and boxes of Ho-ho's, Banana Flips, Snowballs and Zingers could be had for 50¢. We kids thought nothing of polishing off half a box in one go. Little Debbie apple cakes didn't last long either.

    Of course the activity after the snack was going outside and playing not sitting on a video game eating more snacks like now.

    Well, sometimes I'd have a snack and read a book or play with paper dolls or draw on the Etch-a-Sketch. Modern kids didn't invent sedentary hobbies. There probably are trends in physical activity that are relevant here, but I feel like this conversation overall is really flattening out differences and assuming an experience of 1980s life that is not necessarily accurate.


    [ in the middle of BFE Nebraska.

    Ha.

    I've been there....

    and I have never felt more alone in my life.


    s8MP3QN32HsEepgNnHJ6U9Bp.jpeg

  • Motorsheen
    Motorsheen Posts: 20,243 Member
    cwolfman13 wrote: »
    Motorsheen wrote: »
    I have absolutely nothing of value to contribute to this thread. (or much anywhere else.)

    I was just looking for an excuse to post this gif.

    It somehow makes sense here..... maybe.

    giphy.gif?cid=ecf05e4753fffmgpd8ro23fuc6cqgs5d67ndd3ky40u8rcqe&rid=giphy.gif&ct=g



    .

    My mom was super into Richard Simmons...

    AgonizingTiredFantail-max-1mb.gif

    And who could blame her ?!?

    He's Simply Fabulous !

    Richard-Simmons.jpg
  • lynn_glenmont
    lynn_glenmont Posts: 9,254 Member
    Saw an article today that reminded me of the discussion in this thread about whether fat-shaming has disappeared. It's from the mainstream press (WashingtonPost -- I know they have a pay wall, but I think you can read X number of articles for free per month), but it's written by a researcher in this area, and has links to actual studies and content by other researchers.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/overweight-discrimination-common-harmful/2021/06/11/2946c538-c88c-11eb-afd0-9726f7ec0ba6_story.html
  • Speakeasy76
    Speakeasy76 Posts: 945 Member
    Saw an article today that reminded me of the discussion in this thread about whether fat-shaming has disappeared. It's from the mainstream press (WashingtonPost -- I know they have a pay wall, but I think you can read X number of articles for free per month), but it's written by a researcher in this area, and has links to actual studies and content by other researchers.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/overweight-discrimination-common-harmful/2021/06/11/2946c538-c88c-11eb-afd0-9726f7ec0ba6_story.html

    Unfortunately, I'm not surprised, especially with the advent/prevalence of social media and online bullying. It actually seems more prominent than ever, despite the body acceptance movement. Shaming rarely, if ever, results in healthy weight loss or maintenance, either.

    What's even more ironic is that we're fatter than ever as a country, yet this continues.