Myfitnesspal

Message Boards Debate: Health and Fitness
You are currently viewing the message boards in:

Vaccine Passports: Public Health Tool, Or Invasion Of Civil Liberties?

kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,739 Member Member Posts: 23,739 Member
I heard part of an interesting story about vaccine passports in Israel:

https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2021/03/09/vaccine-passports-public-health-tool-or-invasion-of-civil-liberties
Vaccine passports. They give those vaccinated against COVID-19 access to places the unvaccinated can't get into — gyms, bars, schools. But is it a reasonable public health tool, or an erosion of civil liberties?

I don't think the text summaries really do the benefits justice, so that is a little one sided.

This NY Times article about vaccine passports in Israel is almost a month old, so dated:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/18/world/middleeast/israel-covid-vaccine-reopen.html

Here's an article from 12 days ago:

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/02/world/europe/passports-covid-vaccine.html
A world divided between the vaccinated and unvaccinated promises relief for economies and families, but the ethical and practical risks are high.
Vaccine skepticism, already high in many communities, shows signs of spiking if shots become seen as government-mandated.
Some countries require proof of vaccination — for example, against yellow fever — to enter. So do schools and day-care facilities in many American states.

Special privileges for the vaccinated would, by definition, favor demographics that are inoculated at higher rates. In Western countries, those communities tend to be white and well-off.

This evokes an uncomfortable image: professional-class white people disproportionately allowed into shops, baseball games and restaurants, with people of color and members of the working classes disproportionately kept out. If workplaces require proof of vaccination, it could tilt employment as well.

“If vaccines become a passport to doing different things, we’re going to see the communities that have been already hardest hit by Covid being left behind,” said Nicole A. Errett, a University of Washington public health expert.

I see vaccine passports as a great public health tool that has enormous potential for abuse and don't see it getting implemented in many or perhaps not any states in the US.
«13456

Replies

  • ythannahythannah Member Posts: 3,660 Member Member Posts: 3,660 Member
    I would ask what will happen to people that cannot vaccinate through no fault of their own.

    This. Although I imagine there would be some sort of medical certificate issued confirming this.

    I remember, as a child, needing certain vaccinations for travel because they were required by the destination country.
  • 33gail3333gail33 Member Posts: 571 Member Member Posts: 571 Member
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I heard part of an interesting story about vaccine passports in Israel:

    https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2021/03/09/vaccine-passports-public-health-tool-or-invasion-of-civil-liberties
    Vaccine passports. They give those vaccinated against COVID-19 access to places the unvaccinated can't get into — gyms, bars, schools. But is it a reasonable public health tool, or an erosion of civil liberties?

    I don't think the text summaries really do the benefits justice, so that is a little one sided.

    This NY Times article about vaccine passports in Israel is almost a month old, so dated:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/18/world/middleeast/israel-covid-vaccine-reopen.html

    Here's an article from 12 days ago:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/02/world/europe/passports-covid-vaccine.html
    A world divided between the vaccinated and unvaccinated promises relief for economies and families, but the ethical and practical risks are high.
    Vaccine skepticism, already high in many communities, shows signs of spiking if shots become seen as government-mandated.
    Some countries require proof of vaccination — for example, against yellow fever — to enter. So do schools and day-care facilities in many American states.

    Special privileges for the vaccinated would, by definition, favor demographics that are inoculated at higher rates. In Western countries, those communities tend to be white and well-off.

    This evokes an uncomfortable image: professional-class white people disproportionately allowed into shops, baseball games and restaurants, with people of color and members of the working classes disproportionately kept out. If workplaces require proof of vaccination, it could tilt employment as well.

    “If vaccines become a passport to doing different things, we’re going to see the communities that have been already hardest hit by Covid being left behind,” said Nicole A. Errett, a University of Washington public health expert.

    I see vaccine passports as a great public health tool that has enormous potential for abuse and don't see it getting implemented in many or perhaps not any states in the US.

    I'm curious about the statement that in western countries it would favour those who are white and well off. We are just beginning here in Canada, but the vaccine will be available free to anyone who wants it, and in fact we are prioritizing First Nations communities because they are higher risk (I assume). I have heard that the uptake might be lower in marginalized communities due to more vaccine hesitancy so maybe that is what they are implying.

    I am old enough to remember having to get vaccinated for small pox to travel to the UK when I was a kid so when I heard about "vaccine passports" that is what came to mind, international travel. I never thought about it for other things like entering businesses locally and such. I mean if we achieve herd immunity and the virus dies out then it's kind of a moot point I guess, but if it becomes endemic I can see it happening for school and perhaps some occupations but stores and restaurants seems a stretch.
  • siobhanaoifesiobhanaoife Member, Premium Posts: 131 Member Member, Premium Posts: 131 Member
    I third the idea that there needs to be an exemption on medical grounds where justified.

    In California, it's required that children have a certain set of vaccinations in order to go to public or private schools or any kind of group childcare outside the home (daycare, preschool). But there is a process for obtaining a medical exemption (say for children with cancer). Those kids shouldn't get vaccinated and shouldn't be penalized. That's why everyone else is supposed to get vaccinated - to surround the kids who can't get the measles vaccine with herd immunity to measles, so that everyone is (reasonably) safe.

    If an adult has a medical reason to avoid vaccination, any restrictions placed on them for not being vaccinated should be as narrow as possible (perhaps, to protect others, they cannot volunteer at a school, or work as a medical professional in a covid ward) - not, they can't shop or go see a show or the like.
  • freda78freda78 Member Posts: 301 Member Member Posts: 301 Member
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    freda78 wrote: »
    ninerbuff wrote: »
    What I've noticed is that for those who are against vaccination, it's all about civil liberties.....................till they get sick with what they were supposed to be vaccinated against. And if that happens, they shouldn't have an issue being quarantined like anyone else that gets a disease that's transmittable through contact.

    I am for vaccination (just had my AZ - yay!) but still think people would have the absolute right to refuse to be vaccinated.

    But I do not believe not being vaccinated should be consequence free and see no reason why non-essential services and even employment in some circumstances should not be denied you if you choose to decline vaccine without a medical reason.

    Civil liberties work both ways.
    I agree with you. Anyone SHOULD be able to refuse if they want. They just can't believe that just because they did, that they have the ability to be in public areas that might be susceptible to whatever ailment that vaccination helps to protect against.

    I meant "should" not "would". Not a typo exactly, my fingers just not typing what was in my head. :D
  • kshama2001kshama2001 Member Posts: 23,739 Member Member Posts: 23,739 Member
    33gail33 wrote: »
    kshama2001 wrote: »
    I heard part of an interesting story about vaccine passports in Israel:

    https://www.wbur.org/onpoint/2021/03/09/vaccine-passports-public-health-tool-or-invasion-of-civil-liberties
    Vaccine passports. They give those vaccinated against COVID-19 access to places the unvaccinated can't get into — gyms, bars, schools. But is it a reasonable public health tool, or an erosion of civil liberties?

    I don't think the text summaries really do the benefits justice, so that is a little one sided.

    This NY Times article about vaccine passports in Israel is almost a month old, so dated:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/18/world/middleeast/israel-covid-vaccine-reopen.html

    Here's an article from 12 days ago:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/02/world/europe/passports-covid-vaccine.html
    A world divided between the vaccinated and unvaccinated promises relief for economies and families, but the ethical and practical risks are high.
    Vaccine skepticism, already high in many communities, shows signs of spiking if shots become seen as government-mandated.
    Some countries require proof of vaccination — for example, against yellow fever — to enter. So do schools and day-care facilities in many American states.

    Special privileges for the vaccinated would, by definition, favor demographics that are inoculated at higher rates. In Western countries, those communities tend to be white and well-off.

    This evokes an uncomfortable image: professional-class white people disproportionately allowed into shops, baseball games and restaurants, with people of color and members of the working classes disproportionately kept out. If workplaces require proof of vaccination, it could tilt employment as well.

    “If vaccines become a passport to doing different things, we’re going to see the communities that have been already hardest hit by Covid being left behind,” said Nicole A. Errett, a University of Washington public health expert.

    I see vaccine passports as a great public health tool that has enormous potential for abuse and don't see it getting implemented in many or perhaps not any states in the US.

    I'm curious about the statement that in western countries it would favour those who are white and well off. We are just beginning here in Canada, but the vaccine will be available free to anyone who wants it, and in fact we are prioritizing First Nations communities because they are higher risk (I assume). I have heard that the uptake might be lower in marginalized communities due to more vaccine hesitancy so maybe that is what they are implying.

    I am old enough to remember having to get vaccinated for small pox to travel to the UK when I was a kid so when I heard about "vaccine passports" that is what came to mind, international travel. I never thought about it for other things like entering businesses locally and such. I mean if we achieve herd immunity and the virus dies out then it's kind of a moot point I guess, but if it becomes endemic I can see it happening for school and perhaps some occupations but stores and restaurants seems a stretch.

    There is more vaccine hesitancy in marginalized communities, so I am sure that is part of it. But also in my circle we have the resources to spend a lot of time hunting for appointments and then driving to appointments. In my state (Massachusetts) some locations are reserving appointment for people who live in the community, and prioritizing vaccine distribution for some communities harder hit by COVID.
  • SnifterPugSnifterPug Member Posts: 590 Member Member Posts: 590 Member
    I've no problem with vaccine passports.
Sign In or Register to comment.