Subway - the KNIFE and other disgusting practices

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  • sjohnny
    sjohnny Posts: 56,142 Member
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    ILOVE transmissible dioxylethers !!!!

    Wow. Oh well, can't save em all. It's your funeral.
  • stbrad6896
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    I have been gluten free for 1 year now and I LOVED Subway before. Now you can get salads there and let them know NO wheat etc., use clean knife, change gloves, etc... BUT! One day I was going to order one I watched in horror as they cut the sandwich order in front of mine and watched the crumbs slide down that sandwich paper slide right into the lunch meats & veggies that would've gone into a salald!! That would upset any celiac tummy horribly and I no longer order a salad there. I even took pics of it in progress. O.o

    Also this and I'm sure it's just me but I'm very conscious of cross-contamination BECAUSE of allergies and try not to let any crumbs cheese or rogue veggies get where they're not supposed to be, but honestly it's inevitable with the way the line is set up (which ensures speedy sandwich making!) Sooooo if you have a serious allergy then that's you're duty to watch for things like that. But some people just like to *****. and no offense but my sister has celiac and I don't think a bread crumb would hurt her.
  • penrbrown
    penrbrown Posts: 2,685 Member
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    The song's stuck in your head now.

    And the thought of a crusty knife, plunging into a delicious sammich.

    Nope. I've never heard it so it can't get stuck in my head. :D
  • 76tech
    76tech Posts: 1,455 Member
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    The song's stuck in your head now.

    And the thought of a crusty knife, plunging into a delicious sammich.

    Nope. I've never heard it so it can't get stuck in my head. :D

    Now that's just not right.
  • suumoner
    suumoner Posts: 17 Member
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    everyone that I've been in uses the bottles also.
  • infamousmk
    infamousmk Posts: 6,033 Member
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    I don't know if anyone has suggested this idea... but if you're this worked up over knife use at Subway, it may benefit you to prepare your own foodstuffs at home.
  • butterfli7o
    butterfli7o Posts: 1,319 Member
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    Generally speaking, if you're overly concerned about sanitation I wouldn't suggest fast food.

    Exactly!!

    I remember what put me off McD's for good.... Saw a "20/20" special about this very topic. In one segment, they tested the ice machine for fecal matter at the end of each day.. Disturbing how high the count was. Employees aren't always the greatest at washing hands after using the washroom. Ewwww.
    :sick: Oh man. I seriously think this thread might have sent me off fast food for good.
  • sjohnny
    sjohnny Posts: 56,142 Member
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    I don't know if anyone has suggested this idea... but if you're this worked up over knife use at Subway, it may benefit you to prepare your own foodstuffs at home.

    Or you could bring your own knife to Subway and ask them to use it to cut your sangwidge.
  • ZoeLifts
    ZoeLifts Posts: 10,347 Member
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    The song's stuck in your head now.

    And the thought of a crusty knife, plunging into a delicious sammich.

    Nope. I've never heard it so it can't get stuck in my head. :D

    Now that's just not right.

    We only know Queen and Journey around here...
  • 19audrey71
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    As a vegetarian, I thought I was the only one who was totally grossed out by the knife. And they seem to have different color knives. Can't they just color code the green one for veggies only? I only get 6 inch to avoid the gross dragging the goop cut. And tuna before you in line is the grossest.

    I have asked them to rinse the knife off and they complied but looked at me like I was crazy.
  • infamousmk
    infamousmk Posts: 6,033 Member
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    I don't know if anyone has suggested this idea... but if you're this worked up over knife use at Subway, it may benefit you to prepare your own foodstuffs at home.

    Or you could bring your own knife to Subway and ask them to use it to cut your sangwidge.

    I bet there are some kind of health department rules against using random stranger's knives. Just like how Wendy's won't refill your soda with your straw and lid present...


    Also, high fives for Mephistopheles in your ticker!
  • JanaCanada
    JanaCanada Posts: 917 Member
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    Howwever, it isn't asking too much to hold a restaurant acountable for standards they MUST legally adhere to, and speak up about it if/when you witness infractions. i.e, the Subway knife..


    Where, exactly, is not wiping the knife illegal? I really want to know.



    Here you go...(the section between the smiley faces speaks to the issue of cross-contamination and Subway knives):

    From FDA's website: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/GuidanceDocuments/ProduceandPlanProducts/ucm174200.htm#retail

    IX. Retail and Foodservice
    Specific procedures for storing and displaying food, for excluding or restricting ill employees, for washing hands, date-marking, and for washing and sanitizing equipment can be found in the FDA Food Code15. The FDA Food Code is a model code developed by FDA to assist and promote consistent implementation of national food safety regulatory policy among the local, State, and tribal governmental agencies that have primary responsibility for the regulation or oversight of retail level food operations. Further considerations for leafy greens are found below. In addition, handlers of leafy greens should be aware of and follow all Federal, State, and local requirements. Leafy greens may be handled extensively at retail or in food service operations; therefore, it is of particular importance to wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before cutting or handling leafy greens and to rewash hands as necessary.

    A. Retail and Foodservice Handling
    Leafy greens may be contaminated by numerous means in the field-to-fork supply chain. Important considerations at the retail and foodservice level include excluding or restricting ill food workers, ensuring appropriate employee hygiene/handling, using water of adequate quality, and preventing cross-contamination.

    FDA recommends:

    Considering not using leafy greens with visible signs of decay or damage, due to the increased risk of the presence of human pathogens. Decayed or damaged leafy greens and lesions caused by plant pathogens may act as harborage for human pathogens (Ref. 24 ). When in doubt about the use of decayed or distressed product, either removing the unusable portions or not using the leafy greens.
    Utilizing information in the FDA 2005 Food Code Section 3-302.15 (available in PDF16), which specifies: "Raw fruits and vegetables shall be thoroughly washed in water to remove soil and other contaminants before being cut, combined with other ingredients, cooked, served, or offered for human consumption in ready-to-eat form." Not rewashing packaged produce labeled "ready-to-eat," "washed" or "triple washed."
    Ensuring water used to wash leafy greens is of appropriate microbial quality for its intended use.
    Rewashing, after cutting, the leafy greens in a clean and sanitized sink or container. Immersing and agitating the cut leafy greens, then removing from water while avoiding contact with any dirt or debris that may settle out. Repeating the cleaning process as needed with a clean and sanitized basin, sink, or bowl and fresh water.

    :smile: Cleaning and sanitizing all food-contact equipment and utensils that contact cut leafy greens (e.g., cutting boards and knives) with the following steps: washing thoroughly with hot soapy water, rinsing, sanitizing, and air-drying.
    Washing hands thoroughly with soap and water before cutting or handling leafy greens and rewashing hands as necessary. :smile:

    Using a barrier such as gloves and/or an appropriate utensil changed with sufficient frequency to prevent cross-contamination to touch fresh-cut leafy greens. Note: This does not alleviate the need for proper hand-washing.
    Storing and displaying fresh-cut leafy greens under refrigeration throughout distribution to enhance the safety and quality of the product.
    Storing and displaying fresh-cut leafy greens under refrigeration to minimize bacterial growth and delay deterioration of the product.
    Establishing a policy for fresh-cut leafy greens prepared at retail/foodservice for how long the refrigerated product can be displayed and offered for sale. Marking the product, with "prepared on" or "best if used by" date.
    Following manufacturer instructions for the product such as "keep refrigerated" or "best if used by."
    Developing training programs that will educate all potential handlers of leafy greens in retail and food establishments regarding the importance of food safety and the recommendations in this guidance.
  • Pnknlvr96
    Pnknlvr96 Posts: 104 Member
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    I have asked them to rinse the knife off and they complied but looked at me like I was crazy.

    I no longer eat at Subway, because one morning I decided to try an egg sandwich. The guy proceeded to squeeze about 2 tablespoons of oil into the pan. When I spoke up and said "Oh, no oil please," he said, "I have to put oil in it or else it will stick to the pan." Ok, how is THAT healthy?! You'd think Subway could afford non-stick pans.
  • sjohnny
    sjohnny Posts: 56,142 Member
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    I don't know if anyone has suggested this idea... but if you're this worked up over knife use at Subway, it may benefit you to prepare your own foodstuffs at home.

    Or you could bring your own knife to Subway and ask them to use it to cut your sangwidge.

    I bet there are some kind of health department rules against using random stranger's knives. Just like how Wendy's won't refill your soda with your straw and lid present...
    Damn the man.
    Also, high fives for Mephistopheles in your ticker!
    It was my favorite until I had an Uncle Jacob's last weekend.
  • 1ConcreteGirl
    1ConcreteGirl Posts: 3,677 Member
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    At the end of the line - when they have all the glop on your sandwich (note here - I despise mayonnaise and most dressings) they need to fold the sandwich up so they reach for - the KNIFE. The knife that is dripping with mayo and other dressings from the last 50 sandwiches they've made that day. They lay it on your sandwich to hold the toppings in place, fold over the top, and extract the knife such that those remnants get scraped onto your pristine, veggie patty, pepperjack on wheat sub with everything but cucumbers and carrots and a touch of red salsa sub.

    The other thing that disgusts me - the server standing there, waiting for the next sandwich on the assembly line. They are wearing those plastic gloves - for our protection I presume - and they proceed to wipe the counter and push leftover stuff into the trash hole using just the glove, then turn to you and ask what you'd like on your sandwich.

    I'm sure much worse happens behind the scenes at a McDonalds, Hardees, etc. but it's 1) not where you can see it, and 2) I don't eat at those meat-factories.

    What is more disgusting, the Knife or a " veggie patty, pepperjack on wheat sub with everything but cucumbers and carrots and a touch of red salsa sub"?

    My thoughts, your words.
  • kdiamond
    kdiamond Posts: 3,329 Member
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    You think that's bad, just think of what the gross teenagers are doing behind the scene at any fast food joint. Blech!! This is why I make my own subs at home if I am really craving a sub.
  • Jorra
    Jorra Posts: 3,338 Member
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    You think that's bad, just think of what the gross teenagers are doing behind the scene at any fast food joint. Blech!! This is why I make my own subs at home if I am really craving a sub.

    Because everyone who works in fast food is a gross teenager.
  • animalcrackerz
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    Ugh. This is why I just cook my own stuff. I can't trust restaurants I have to know exactly what goes inside my body. Plus I am a fantastic cook..so..
  • MantisToboggan_MD
    MantisToboggan_MD Posts: 30 Member
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    Friends don't let friends eat at Subway.
  • Brunner26_2
    Brunner26_2 Posts: 1,152
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    Howwever, it isn't asking too much to hold a restaurant acountable for standards they MUST legally adhere to, and speak up about it if/when you witness infractions. i.e, the Subway knife..


    Where, exactly, is not wiping the knife illegal? I really want to know.



    Here you go...(the section between the smiley faces speaks to the issue of cross-contamination and Subway knives):

    From FDA's website: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/GuidanceDocuments/ProduceandPlanProducts/ucm174200.htm#retail

    IX. Retail and Foodservice
    Specific procedures for storing and displaying food, for excluding or restricting ill employees, for washing hands, date-marking, and for washing and sanitizing equipment can be found in the FDA Food Code15. The FDA Food Code is a model code developed by FDA to assist and promote consistent implementation of national food safety regulatory policy among the local, State, and tribal governmental agencies that have primary responsibility for the regulation or oversight of retail level food operations. Further considerations for leafy greens are found below. In addition, handlers of leafy greens should be aware of and follow all Federal, State, and local requirements. Leafy greens may be handled extensively at retail or in food service operations; therefore, it is of particular importance to wash hands thoroughly with soap and water before cutting or handling leafy greens and to rewash hands as necessary.

    A. Retail and Foodservice Handling
    Leafy greens may be contaminated by numerous means in the field-to-fork supply chain. Important considerations at the retail and foodservice level include excluding or restricting ill food workers, ensuring appropriate employee hygiene/handling, using water of adequate quality, and preventing cross-contamination.

    FDA recommends:

    Considering not using leafy greens with visible signs of decay or damage, due to the increased risk of the presence of human pathogens. Decayed or damaged leafy greens and lesions caused by plant pathogens may act as harborage for human pathogens (Ref. 24 ). When in doubt about the use of decayed or distressed product, either removing the unusable portions or not using the leafy greens.
    Utilizing information in the FDA 2005 Food Code Section 3-302.15 (available in PDF16), which specifies: "Raw fruits and vegetables shall be thoroughly washed in water to remove soil and other contaminants before being cut, combined with other ingredients, cooked, served, or offered for human consumption in ready-to-eat form." Not rewashing packaged produce labeled "ready-to-eat," "washed" or "triple washed."
    Ensuring water used to wash leafy greens is of appropriate microbial quality for its intended use.
    Rewashing, after cutting, the leafy greens in a clean and sanitized sink or container. Immersing and agitating the cut leafy greens, then removing from water while avoiding contact with any dirt or debris that may settle out. Repeating the cleaning process as needed with a clean and sanitized basin, sink, or bowl and fresh water.

    :smile: Cleaning and sanitizing all food-contact equipment and utensils that contact cut leafy greens (e.g., cutting boards and knives) with the following steps: washing thoroughly with hot soapy water, rinsing, sanitizing, and air-drying.
    Washing hands thoroughly with soap and water before cutting or handling leafy greens and rewashing hands as necessary. :smile:

    Using a barrier such as gloves and/or an appropriate utensil changed with sufficient frequency to prevent cross-contamination to touch fresh-cut leafy greens. Note: This does not alleviate the need for proper hand-washing.
    Storing and displaying fresh-cut leafy greens under refrigeration throughout distribution to enhance the safety and quality of the product.
    Storing and displaying fresh-cut leafy greens under refrigeration to minimize bacterial growth and delay deterioration of the product.
    Establishing a policy for fresh-cut leafy greens prepared at retail/foodservice for how long the refrigerated product can be displayed and offered for sale. Marking the product, with "prepared on" or "best if used by" date.
    Following manufacturer instructions for the product such as "keep refrigerated" or "best if used by."
    Developing training programs that will educate all potential handlers of leafy greens in retail and food establishments regarding the importance of food safety and the recommendations in this guidance.

    Yeah, they wash and sanitize their dishes every day, not between every sandwich! And I'm going to preemptively argue the stuff about fresh-cut leafy greens doesn't apply anyway because their veggies arrive at the stores in a bag cut and cleaned already.