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Anti-inflammatory foods

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  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.

    @rainbowbow from my personal experience I think very few things applies to everyone when it comes to diet. In my case when I cut all carbs to less than 50 grams daily and held protein down to 70-90 grams daily and made up the rest of my calories from fats (avoiding any from grains like soybeans/sunflower/etc) my joint and muscle pain of 40 year duration dropped from a subjective 7-8 level to 2-3 in just 30 days. 1.5 years later the pain is still low, I am down 50 pounds and my IBS left after the 1st six month of eating this way and so far has not returned.

    A food that is bad for me may be good for another and the other way around.

    I am heavy into fried bacon, eggs, sausages, dairy (as in Heavy Whipping Cream, cheeses and the like but not so much in high lactose forms) plus a lot of cocoa and regular coffee along with nuts like almonds, cashews, macadamia. 80% of my 2200-2500 calories daily come from fats hence this example list of foods.

    At age 65 currently my health and health markers are better then when I was 45. I do not know why carbs do such a number on my health and others can seem to eat them just fine.

    You have your health records from 20 years ago?
  • ForecasterJasonForecasterJason Posts: 2,582Member Member Posts: 2,582Member Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.
    I am down 50 pounds and my IBS left after the 1st six month of eating this way and so far has not returned.
    Out of curiosity, IBS-C or IBS-D? I ask because there's a big difference between the two, and I would think fixing one type using a given method may not work for the other type.
  • jgnatcajgnatca Posts: 14,495Member Member Posts: 14,495Member Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    jgnatca wrote: »
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.

    Yes, I think inflammation could be related to an allergic reaction, and that can be highly individual. Migraine sufferers also may be triggered by some known foods and not others. I see the current wisdom is to NOT try and avoid all possible triggers, but if a food is a known culprit, avoid that.

    One way to figure out what is a problem for you is to start with a very bland FODMAP diet and then slowly incorporate foods week by week back in to your diet. If you have a bad reaction one week, you have a clue what food you may need to avoid.

    I figured out I had an allergy to almonds (but no other nuts) by meticulously logging and reviewing my diet. My (family doctor) sister warned me that a food allergy (hives, for me) can show up a couple days after ingestion. So I would have to review everything I ate over the last couple days to see if there was anything new or different I was eating.

    ....This is mostly because I am a lifelong vegetarian, and i feel like it cuts out a huge part of my already restrictive diet. I guess really, I should plan accordingly and see what happens. ... You'd think this would be enough of a motivator. :expressionless:

    Keep in mind that an experiment like this would be for a short period of time, and will reap answers. I suggest also that you start putting together a list of foods that do work well. So you can focus on all the things you can eat instead of the ones you can't.
  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    stealthq wrote: »
    stealthq wrote: »
    A PI in my department studies the effects of curcurmin (active component) in turmeric in the context of a couple of different cancers, colorectal is his main focus. He's branching out to other diseases.

    Unfortunately, while curcurmin definitely has an anti-inflammatory effect both in vivo and in vitro (shown via microarray as a down-regulation of inflammatory pathway transcripts in blood and the tissue cultures tested), you don't get enough curcurmin from the amounts of turmeric eaten in food to do much of anything. Not even if you eat it at almost every meal.

    If you take turmeric capsules as supplements, there is a real risk of toxicity from overdose of other components of turmeric. You can get curcurmin supplements. Those would be the better choice, but keep in mind that an anti-inflammatory response is not in all cases a good thing. Anti-inflammatories can also impede the body's ability to fight off disease - inflammation is part of that process.

    I know the importance of inflammation but as I said earlier I have Crohn's disease so inflammation is a big problem for me. I will try curcurmin supplements.

    I wasn't addressing anyone in particular, there were several posts that mentioned turmeric so I was providing general info.

    Just FYI - I do know someone who has very severe Crohn's (son of a friend) and he has not had any luck with any anti-inflammatory he tried. He is doing pretty well on a biologic - can't remember the name of it off the top of my head.

    Remicade, humira or entyvio? I'm on Remicade. I have had no luck but twillimg to try

    Definitely not entyvio. I can't remember if he started off on humira and when it didn't help switched to remicade, or vice versa. I think the former.

    I remember sending some research to them on thalidomide as a potential treatment, but once the biologic started working well enough that the son can hold a job, they quit looking to improve matters. They had so many things fail, I'm not surprised.
  • FunkyTobiasFunkyTobias Posts: 1,776Member Member Posts: 1,776Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    I'm impressed that you took the time to review. A lot of the discussion points to a 1950's study that I'm having trouble finding the text of: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14776685

    What surprises (and disappoints) me is that researchers often cite the anti inflammatory properties of cherries without even providing links, as though it is a known fact, no evidence required.

    When clinicians and researchers sound like Dothraki, there's a problem
    53532811.jpg

    Argumentum ad Dothrakium
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    I have inflammatory disorder triggered by medical injuries. Definitely relate to a lot of these posts because my symptoms are also food related. Seems like there is so much conflicting information. And can be influenced by the individual. For example if a person has celiac disease, other food intolerance disorders, etc. Ultimately I have learned I need to watch my own reactions. But, I have two conflicting medical issues because I was injured by two different types of medications. Sorry I haven't been able to add to the debate in the way you were asking. I just find the information to be contradictory and dependant upon the disorders the person has. After my initial antibiotic injury I was recovering fine for six months. But, then I was wrongly prescribed a vasoconstrictor that caused a nerve disorder in my face that reacts to food. And that diet caused the condition from the antibiotics to become problematic.
  • GaleHawkinsGaleHawkins Posts: 7,623Member Member Posts: 7,623Member Member
    rainbowbow wrote: »
    i'd be curious to know if this is something that applies to everyone across the board or if anti inflammatory foods come down to an individual basis.

    I am only questioning this because i want a few tests done (like the ALCAT) as i've seen that some foods may be perfectly fine and others may be poorly tolerated on a case by case basis.

    I have an auto immune disease (sjorgen's syndrome) as well as rosacea both of which can be worsened or even triggered with certain foods. Typically i see things such as curcumin (turmeric) and ginger be recommended and avoiding things that may be inflammatory such as: spicy foods, fried foods, tomatoes, dairy, and chocolate/caffiene. Are these foods simply more likely to cause inflammation in humans in general?

    I haven't found my specific food triggers and i suspect that i likely have many food intolerances going on that i'm eating unawaredly.
    I am down 50 pounds and my IBS left after the 1st six month of eating this way and so far has not returned.
    Out of curiosity, IBS-C or IBS-D? I ask because there's a big difference between the two, and I would think fixing one type using a given method may not work for the other type.

    @ForecasterJason I was never to IBS was C or D in my case. Others in the family have be told IBS-C.

    Actually I did not cut out sugars and all forms of grains to cure my IBS but to manage my joint and muscle pain. The IBS resolving and staying that way after 6 months was just a side effect of very LCHF Way Of Eating in my case.
  • arditarosearditarose Posts: 15,610Member Member Posts: 15,610Member Member
    Sorry to be dense...but is inflammation only associated with joints/muscles?
    Would puffing/bloating/skin tenderness and pain be considered inflammation?
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    arditarose wrote: »
    Sorry to be dense...but is inflammation only associated with joints/muscles?
    Would puffing/bloating/skin tenderness and pain be considered inflammation?

    No, inflammation can involve a myriad of bodily areas and conditions. Some go so far as to say depression and mental health issues might be forms of inflammation.
    Some forms of puffing, bloating, and tenderness could be an inflammatory response.
  • arditarosearditarose Posts: 15,610Member Member Posts: 15,610Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    arditarose wrote: »
    Sorry to be dense...but is inflammation only associated with joints/muscles?
    Would puffing/bloating/skin tenderness and pain be considered inflammation?

    No, inflammation can involve a myriad of bodily areas and conditions. Some go so far as to say depression and mental health issues might be forms of inflammation.
    Some forms of puffing, bloating, and tenderness could be an inflammatory response.

    Hmm..I'll look into this more. Thank you.
  • stealthqstealthq Posts: 4,307Member Member Posts: 4,307Member Member
    senecarr wrote: »
    arditarose wrote: »
    Sorry to be dense...but is inflammation only associated with joints/muscles?
    Would puffing/bloating/skin tenderness and pain be considered inflammation?

    No, inflammation can involve a myriad of bodily areas and conditions. Some go so far as to say depression and mental health issues might be forms of inflammation.
    Some forms of puffing, bloating, and tenderness could be an inflammatory response.

    Just to add, if the skin tenderness is accompanied by heat or redness it's pretty likely to be inflammation.
  • BinaryPulsarBinaryPulsar Posts: 9,068Member Member Posts: 9,068Member Member
    You can definitely have inflammation in the skin or inflammatory skin disorders. Acne and rosacea are inflammatory skin disorders for example. But, there are more auto-immune diseases that impact skin as well.
  • arditarosearditarose Posts: 15,610Member Member Posts: 15,610Member Member
    You can definitely have inflammation in the skin or inflammatory skin disorders. Acne and rosacea are inflammatory skin disorders for example. But, there are more auto-immune diseases that impact skin as well.

    I'm thinking more of a skin "soreness". It's a bruised feeling I get when I eat above a certain amount of sugar. I don't want to derail this thread with it but some people on here have seen my personal thread about it.
  • senecarrsenecarr Posts: 5,377Member Member Posts: 5,377Member Member
    arditarose wrote: »
    You can definitely have inflammation in the skin or inflammatory skin disorders. Acne and rosacea are inflammatory skin disorders for example. But, there are more auto-immune diseases that impact skin as well.

    I'm thinking more of a skin "soreness". It's a bruised feeling I get when I eat above a certain amount of sugar. I don't want to derail this thread with it but some people on here have seen my personal thread about it.

    Actually, some anti-inflammatory foods increase, not decrease, bruising, if you have actual bruises - I've personally observed this in people for fish oil supplementation for a person already eating seafood regularly. There is some mild evidence that it reduces muscle soreness.
  • Ws2016Ws2016 Posts: 428Member Member Posts: 428Member Member
    Nightshades are inflammatory to some. That's tomatoes, peopers, eggplant.
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