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Low carb and PCOS?

HaleCryHaleCry Posts: 341Member Member Posts: 341Member Member
I'm sure there have been quite a few posts on this, but I'm kind of new to MFP and wanted up to date opinions and advice. I've heard a lot of controversy about low carb but this isn't strictly for weight loss (though ideally, this would be great too!!).

I have PCOS, and was advised by my doctor to go low carb as apparently that would help my symptoms. However, I'm finding it extremely difficult to find eat both low carb and meet my calorie goal! I feel like I'm eating the same thing all the time and need some variation.

Is anyone else in the same boat or can give me any advice? I'd love to hear success stories from people who have gone low carb too.

Any help is appreciated, thank you!
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Replies

  • HaleCryHaleCry Posts: 341Member Member Posts: 341Member Member
    I thought PCOS was a life long condition and people just worked on maintaining the symptoms? I didn't think it could be cured?
  • aeb09aeb09 Posts: 427Member Member Posts: 427Member Member
    I have severe PCOS and lost 100lbs in 2014 living a ketogenic (low carb, high fat, moderate protein) lifestyle. Your calories come from the fats you are supposed to eat when you decide to go low carb. Eating low carb and low fat is not the right way to do it. Please PM if you'd like, I can give you numerous wonderful sources of information. Keto is awesome to help with PCOS and I'm not the only one who thinks so.

    Also @DancingDarl, eating low carb is correcting the underlying causes in most cases. It reduces the insulin resistance, it stabilizes blood sugar, it gives you sustainable energy. I'm really happy to hear you were "cured," but for many of us it is not that easy.
  • MelaniaTrumpMelaniaTrump Posts: 2,700Member Member Posts: 2,700Member Member
    Eat lots of veggies for fiber.
    If you can eat beans, go for them. They have potassium, magnesium, zinc. Good for you food.
  • kelseyraehill9kelseyraehill9 Posts: 2Member Member Posts: 2Member Member
    Hey there! I have PCOS too, and have been on keto/LCHF for just over three weeks (down 12lbs).

    The tough thing about keto is that it requires a lot of meal prep if that's not your thing, or not what you're used to.

    I highly recommend checking out ruled.me for some great recipes, with varying levels of prep required.

    Experiment with variations on simple meals, too. I eat two eggs almost every morning, cooked in coconut oil. Sometimes I put cheese on, sometimes sriracha, sometimes peanut butter (you heard right - it's seriously delicious).

    Salads also leave a lot of room for variation. Try ranch, blue cheese, or olive oil with rosemary or a little bit of balsamic vinegar (watch the sugar in that though). Top it with cheese, cucumbers, broccoli, ham, or my favorite - tuna salad :)

    PM me if you want some more ideas!
  • RodaRoseRodaRose Posts: 9,551Member Member Posts: 9,551Member Member
    HaleCry wrote: »
    I'm sure there have been quite a few posts on this, but I'm kind of new to MFP and wanted up to date opinions and advice. I've heard a lot of controversy about low carb but this isn't strictly for weight loss (though ideally, this would be great too!!).

    I have PCOS, and was advised by my doctor to go low carb as apparently that would help my symptoms. However, I'm finding it extremely difficult to find eat both low carb and meet my calorie goal! I feel like I'm eating the same thing all the time and need some variation.

    Is anyone else in the same boat or can give me any advice? I'd love to hear success stories from people who have gone low carb too.

    Any help is appreciated, thank you!

    When you go low carb, you increase your fats and oils: dark meat chicken, beef, butter, eggs, cheese, salmon, half and half, sour cream, butter, sausages, bacon, avocados, walnuts, coconut oil, full fat yogurt, full fat ranch dressing,

  • Christine_72Christine_72 Posts: 16,074Member Member Posts: 16,074Member Member
    PCOS can not be cured. It can be treated and managed, but doctors have yet not found a "cure".
  • kitterz83kitterz83 Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
    PCOS is a hormonal imbalance and affects different people in various ways. There is not a "cure". Like others stated it can be managed though.

    With that said, what works for me, may not work for others. But I did very well with "clean eating" and some minor exercise. My Endo suggested low carb to help get rid of my IR (which is seriously low and almost non-exhistant). So now I am trying LCHF.

    I saw someone mentioned Ruled.me - that is an awesome resource with tons of recipes. I also like Carbe Diem, Ketobetic Aline (she's adorable) and various youtubers like Michelle Rock and Keto Karma. Make Google your best friend. Try recipes.

    With keto you cannot think calories more so than meeting your macros. You need to make meeting your fats, while keeping your carbs the lowest possible to stay in ketosis. Don't forget your supplements too.

    Good luck! :-)
  • LKArghLKArgh Posts: 5,085Member Member Posts: 5,085Member Member
    You can cure it I have several friends and have seen a multitude of women who has reversed it.

    If you like I can tell you all what worked for me and it was really cheap too. But as always everyone is sadly misinformed about these things and assume they have to suffer alone.
    It can be genetic or lifestyle factors as the cause but you can also develop it like I did.
    Research if you like but there has been proven studies on what is inside these cysts when they are removed. There are also people who will tell you it is caused by nutritional deficiencies and you can see why if you research it.

    If anyone wants to know more you can ask me in private messages. But for now I am totally fed up with stubborn close mindedness. I am willing to share and help others.

    So, is there a reason you are not sharing? I cannot find anything new by googling. I have an appointment with my endocrinologist next month. If there is something new on the topic, I would want to discuss it.
    Also, what do you mean by removing cysts? I have heard of ovarian drilling, but I am guessign this is nto what you are talking about?
  • AshtoretetAshtoretet Posts: 378Member Member Posts: 378Member Member
    "Cured" is not the right word because if it recurs even once in your lifetime, it's not true anymore. Managed to the point of being asymptomatic is probably better phrasing.

    I had lots of cysts, more body hair, acne, irregular periods, and probably some other random symptoms I'm forgetting at my highest weight. Now that I'm a healthy weight, as of my last ultrasound, I no longer have any PCOS symptoms and functionally consider myself "cured."

    I did not worry about low carb to lose that weight and I lost weight at an expected rate.
  • Rockchick09Rockchick09 Posts: 200Member Member Posts: 200Member Member
    I have PCOS as well but I did a low GI index diet to start with. Turns out it works out great and it's very similar to the low garb one
  • Sued0nimSued0nim Posts: 17,504Member Member Posts: 17,504Member Member
    aggelikik wrote: »
    aggelikik wrote: »
    PCOS is not caused by an infection. Maybe you are confusing ovarian cysts with PCOS.

    There are many different underlying causes that lead to a diagnosis of pcos. Not everyone has the same symtoms and there are heaps of women that have it without having insulin resitance.

    As far as I know, there are many different symptoms, not many different causes. And there is no cure. Has an endocrinologist told you otherwise? If yes, this is very interesting, so could you please share? It is something I most certainly would want to discuss with my dr at my next appointment.

    PCOS =/= cystic ovaries

    Absolutely agree with @aggelikik - I would be fascinated to find out how a hormonal imbalance can be caused by an infection - please source this

    Current thinking regarding PCOS causes, as far as I am aware, is a hormonal imbalance: testosterone, luteinising hormone, binding globulin and prolactin (in some)

    Pregnancy may help reverse hormonal imbalances .. certainly did for me
  • EvgeniZyntxEvgeniZyntx Posts: 24,424Member Member Posts: 24,424Member Member
    rabbitjb wrote: »
    aggelikik wrote: »
    aggelikik wrote: »
    PCOS is not caused by an infection. Maybe you are confusing ovarian cysts with PCOS.

    There are many different underlying causes that lead to a diagnosis of pcos. Not everyone has the same symtoms and there are heaps of women that have it without having insulin resitance.

    As far as I know, there are many different symptoms, not many different causes. And there is no cure. Has an endocrinologist told you otherwise? If yes, this is very interesting, so could you please share? It is something I most certainly would want to discuss with my dr at my next appointment.

    PCOS =/= cystic ovaries

    Absolutely agree with @aggelikik - I would be fascinated to find out how a hormonal imbalance can be caused by an infection - please source this

    Current thinking regarding PCOS causes, as far as I am aware, is a hormonal imbalance: testosterone, luteinising hormone, binding globulin and prolactin (in some)

    Pregnancy may help reverse hormonal imbalances .. certainly did for me
    It certainly did not reverse it for me!lol
    The infection my doctor said likely caused nutritional deficits and led to overeating. The precence of the infection he said causes inflammation as there waste is toxic so that explained the inflamation of my ovaries and they cysts themselves vanished after treatment.

    Hormones were normal, periods went back to 30 days. I was lucky to find an endocrinologist with a understanding of what these infections can do. So like I said befire I am lucky that I realised this sooner rather than later.

    So what kind of infection did you have?

    Edit: If you are saying that pinworm/roundworm/etc gave you PCOS like symptoms - that is perhaps possible. However, you didn't have PCOS.

    However parasite testing is also a field full of quackery.
    edited April 2016
  • amusedmonkeyamusedmonkey Posts: 9,677Member Member Posts: 9,677Member Member
    I have PCOS and I have found weight loss alone helps tremendously with the symptoms. I'm also no longer pre-diabetic. I tried to go the low carb route, but it was too stressful for me. As my personal symptoms are more affected by stress than carbs, I opted for a normal carb eat what you want kind of diet. What I found really helpful is exercise, since it both activates muscles (lowers insulin resistance) and reduces stress.

    If you still wish to give low carb dieting a try, this website includes plenty of interesting low carb recipes.
    edited April 2016
  • HaleCryHaleCry Posts: 341Member Member Posts: 341Member Member
    Thank you everyone for your help!! I didn't expect this to turn into a bit of a debate lol. Anyone is welcome to add me by the way if you wish.

    @DancingDarl - I'm not saying you're wrong, bloods don't lie and if your hormone levels are normal then congratulations, but I think you're the first person this has ever happens to as as far as I was concerned once you had PCOS, you had it for life and it was just about managing the symptoms. Congrats though ☺️
  • Sued0nimSued0nim Posts: 17,504Member Member Posts: 17,504Member Member
    :D what a lovely way of putting it @halecry
  • flranchoflrancho Posts: 266Member Member Posts: 266Member Member
    I find it strange that your doctor suggested low carb for PCOS.

    I have endometriosis, which I understand is a completely different condition. However, they are both hormone based and exclusively a female condition. I regulate the amount of meat/dairy I consume that has been raised with or has hormones added to it. This has greatly lessened the amount of pain I am in each month.

    Seeing as how they are both hormonal/women's issues, I would think buying organic meats or considering going vegetarian, would be more effective than cutting or eliminating carbs.
  • HaleCryHaleCry Posts: 341Member Member Posts: 341Member Member
    flrancho wrote: »
    I find it strange that your doctor suggested low carb for PCOS.

    I have endometriosis, which I understand is a completely different condition. However, they are both hormone based and exclusively a female condition. I regulate the amount of meat/dairy I consume that has been raised with or has hormones added to it. This has greatly lessened the amount of pain I am in each month.

    Seeing as how they are both hormonal/women's issues, I would think buying organic meats or considering going vegetarian, would be more effective than cutting or eliminating carbs.

    I think it has something to do with the insulin resistance? I'm not too sure how it works, I just know that that is what my doctor advised and apparently many women with PCOS have found success with low carb ☺️

  • LKArghLKArgh Posts: 5,085Member Member Posts: 5,085Member Member
    flrancho wrote: »
    I find it strange that your doctor suggested low carb for PCOS.

    I have endometriosis, which I understand is a completely different condition. However, they are both hormone based and exclusively a female condition. I regulate the amount of meat/dairy I consume that has been raised with or has hormones added to it. This has greatly lessened the amount of pain I am in each month.

    Seeing as how they are both hormonal/women's issues, I would think buying organic meats or considering going vegetarian, would be more effective than cutting or eliminating carbs.

    The mechanism is not the same (I suffer from both). PCOS is sometimes accompanied by insulin resistance, in which case monitoring carbs will help and also prevent diabetes.
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