Life after C25K?

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So, I'm set to graduate Couch 2 5K next week and I plan to keep running after I finish the program. I'm really motivated by increasing my distance over time and always have been. However, I'm having a hard time figuring out where I should go from here?

I've been using the ZenLabs Couch210K app, but I don't like that it goes back to walk intervals after Week 8, so I don't really want to do that or Bridge 2 10K. I've heard mixed things about Hal Higdon's novice marathon plans. Some people seem to love them and some people think they ramp up the distance too quickly, especially near the end. I haven't really heard anything about his half marathon plan.

Would it be crazy to just start out running 30 minutes 2x a week + 1 35 minute run for the first week and increase my times by five minutes each week? I'm probably over thinking things- I just do really well with structure and want to run more.

Replies

  • girlinahat
    girlinahat Posts: 2,956 Member
    edited May 2017
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    General rule of thumb is not to increase your long run more than 10% a week, and to keep your long run around 30% of your weekly total.

    Definitely work in consolidating your runs and start gradually increasing your time spent running. You could try increasing your long run, then the next week slightly increasing your short runs but keep the long run time the same as the previous week then repeat as a cycle.

    Welcome to running. I did c25k and got hooked. I didn't do any structured plan after that, apart from a gradual but inconsistent increase in time. My first half on Sunday.
  • yellingkimber
    yellingkimber Posts: 229 Member
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    Thanks guys. I'm glad to be back into it. In high school, I would sometimes run 6 miles and sometimes 3 miles 3x a week, but I just kind of yolo'd it and got lucky because I was younger. C25K definitely reminded me of that addict feeling.

    Good luck on your half!
  • Jthanmyfitnesspal
    Jthanmyfitnesspal Posts: 3,522 Member
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    Intervals are a great way to improve overall fitness and speed. It's easy for running, just set a timer and push the pace for a minute every few minutes, going back to a jog or walk to recover. I like monitoring my heart rate, but it isn't essential.

    Lately, I've been adding length by tacking on a slow jog at the end. I find I can add an additional mile fairly easily.
  • Hoshiko
    Hoshiko Posts: 179 Member
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    In the past I've used Hal Higdon's Spring Training Novice after CT5K. From there it progressed to his 10K Novice and then to his half, and finally to a full marathon training. I didn't feel that his programs ramped up the mileage too much at all, but I'm a pretty slow runner and tend to recover pretty fast.

    Like girlinahat said, if you want to add in distance yourself the 10% rule is key, as well as spreading out your weekly mileage and having regular cutback weeks.

    @girlinahat, good luck Sunday!
  • spiriteagle99
    spiriteagle99 Posts: 3,686 Member
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    There is a program called the One Hour Runner that does exactly what you said: it adds 5 minutes to your long run every week. I did my own version of that, because I didn't want to go back to run/walk intervals. If you do it on your own, take a cut back week every three or four where you cut your mileage a bit.

    I wouldn't do a marathon plan at this point. You could do Higdon's Winter or Spring Training or one of his 10k programs. I wouldn't even recommend a HM training yet either, simply because that is what I did and I ended up injured from doing too much too soon. Spend a few months building your miles, safely, then maybe think about training for a HM in the fall. You might also want to do some short races this summer. They are a lot of fun.
  • heiliskrimsli
    heiliskrimsli Posts: 735 Member
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    I did Hal Higdon's half marathon training and really liked it. I didn't find that it ramped up too quickly at all, but the rest days are super important in training. Over training is a thing, and it is not good. Another thing that I like about Higdon is that there are options to choose from. I looked at a couple, assessed my level of ability, and picked one that seemed to match up with me. It did work out really well for me, too.
  • yellingkimber
    yellingkimber Posts: 229 Member
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    You might also want to do some short races this summer. They are a lot of fun.

    There aren't any races where I live right now, but I'm moving in two weeks and my first 5K is scheduled for July 4th. Can't wait!
  • ABabilonia
    ABabilonia Posts: 622 Member
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    You might also want to do some short races this summer. They are a lot of fun.

    There aren't any races where I live right now, but I'm moving in two weeks and my first 5K is scheduled for July 4th. Can't wait!

    Congrats on finishing the program. I'm set to finish the program in two weeks and my first 5K is also scheduled for July 4th. I have an official 3.5 miles in May 25th, but that's more fun at work than an actual race.
  • curlsintherack
    curlsintherack Posts: 465 Member
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    runkeeper.com has some very basic half marathon plans which start you out running 3 times a week with 3 mile runs and slowly builds you up from there. I think they end with 5 miles per short day and maybe 11 for long runs. you could just do each week twice or something if you don't actually have a dedicated race in mind. I went from c25k last May to half marathon in October. I decided to run the half in September so I didn't give myself quite enough timer and the race although I finished in a decent beginners time just wasn't the awesome experience it could have been.
  • yellingkimber
    yellingkimber Posts: 229 Member
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    lsutton484 wrote: »
    runkeeper.com has some very basic half marathon plans which start you out running 3 times a week with 3 mile runs and slowly builds you up from there. I think they end with 5 miles per short day and maybe 11 for long runs. you could just do each week twice or something if you don't actually have a dedicated race in mind. I went from c25k last May to half marathon in October. I decided to run the half in September so I didn't give myself quite enough timer and the race although I finished in a decent beginners time just wasn't the awesome experience it could have been.

    @lsutton484 I was looking at their app last night and it looks like their best features are locked behind a pay wall. Is that true of their website, too?
  • curlsintherack
    curlsintherack Posts: 465 Member
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    I used it for about 6 months before I got a gps watch and took advantage of their holiday discounts to pick up the pay version for I think $10 a year. I won't bother to be spending that money again.

    Honestly though most of everything you actually need is available in their free version. Well you don't actually need any of it but you can get your time distance heart rate monitoring in the free version. They have some things that aren't available in the free app like goal insights but thats a complete joke. They also note the weather in your particular area when you workout but thats not really anything I pay attention to.

    I've moved onto my second gps watch now which happens to be my first Garmin and I'll just use the garmin connect running plans for now.
  • Philtex
    Philtex Posts: 947 Member
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    My new first is going to be on May 21st :D

    Good luck....have fun!
  • joanna_82
    joanna_82 Posts: 151 Member
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    I would suggest just getting used to regularly running your 5k and then once a week just add on another 5-10 minutes if running- building up to 10k if that's your goal. You might find it easier just to stick at 5k for a little while until it feels comfortable before increasing the distance. Just enjoy it- running is awesome!
  • RuNaRoUnDaFiEld
    RuNaRoUnDaFiEld Posts: 5,864 Member
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    girlinahat wrote: »
    General rule of thumb is not to increase your long run more than 10% a week, and to keep your long run around 30% of your weekly total.

    Definitely work in consolidating your runs and start gradually increasing your time spent running. You could try increasing your long run, then the next week slightly increasing your short runs but keep the long run time the same as the previous week then repeat as a cycle.

    Welcome to running. I did c25k and got hooked. I didn't do any structured plan after that, apart from a gradual but inconsistent increase in time. My first half on Sunday.

    Off topic I realise but very best of luck for today :)
  • MeanderingMammal
    MeanderingMammal Posts: 7,866 Member
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    girlinahat wrote: »
    General rule of thumb is not to increase your long run more than 10% a week, and to keep your long run around 30% of your weekly total.

    Definitely work in consolidating your runs and start gradually increasing your time spent running. You could try increasing your long run, then the next week slightly increasing your short runs but keep the long run time the same as the previous week then repeat as a cycle.

    Welcome to running. I did c25k and got hooked. I didn't do any structured plan after that, apart from a gradual but inconsistent increase in time. My first half on Sunday.

    Off topic I realise but very best of luck for today :)

    It's a cracking route. I did the 12 hour yesterday and loved it.