I'm so so stuck

crevtion
crevtion Posts: 72 Member
edited May 2017 in Health and Weight Loss
I began my fitness journey a year ago. I was always a healthy weight and my goal has been to tone up. I've started a regular routine 6 months ago where I do resistance training exercises 5-6 days a week between 30-60min. For certain exercises I use 4kg weights.
I haven't been able to see much physical change though (and I highlight I started a year ago). I mean I have a very very strong core, and I feel muscles in my legs and overall I feel stronger and endurance is so much better too. However... my body looks almost the same?? I don't know what to do to lose more fat because I want the look of thinner leaner legs and have my abs showing.

I know diet is key and I've been eating healthy. Never added sugar or processed foods. I eat a lot of veg with whole grains and fruits. However my macros are at 70+ carbs and the rest fat and protein. My question is, does this ratio make it harder to lose fat? I am a vegetarian who is intolerant to lactose, nuts, avocados, soya, and have stomach ache after too much olive and coconut oil... so what on earth am I to eat that is protein and fat?

Initially I lost weight at a calorie deficit. Then I reverse dieted and my calories went up. I then went to a deficit again but nothing budged yet. In fact I put weight on but perhaps it's muscles idk.

I know you guys are no doctors but often the advice of those in the fitness world are actually more clued in and could offer some good advice!

Help a gal out, I sweat my *kitten* off and wish I could see the results better!!

Replies

  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    If you want to lose body fat (which is what people typically mean by "tone up"), the number of calories you eat is going to be important. You say you're eating "healthy," but how many calories are you eating? How accurate is your logging?
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    I ate at 1200 when I started. And lost weight. But then I went up to around 1600-1700cal. And now I'm trying to go to 1200-1300 again. I used to use a food scale so it was accurate. I no longer do because I now know how many spoons of this or that weighs because I eat the same things.
  • quiksylver296
    quiksylver296 Posts: 28,364 Member
    Lift heavy (for you) weights on a proven progressive lifting program like Stronglifts or Strong Curves. Eat at maintenance calories for now, or a slight calorie deficit (-250 calories per day), using a food scale again. Although you say you know how many calories are in everything, you aren't reaching the goal you desire. Then put your patient pants on. It's going to take awhile. I'm 2.5 years in, and still working.

  • moonstroller
    moonstroller Posts: 210 Member
    Are you doing any cardio?
  • janejellyroll
    janejellyroll Posts: 25,878 Member
    crevtion wrote: »
    I ate at 1200 when I started. And lost weight. But then I went up to around 1600-1700cal. And now I'm trying to go to 1200-1300 again. I used to use a food scale so it was accurate. I no longer do because I now know how many spoons of this or that weighs because I eat the same things.

    It may be worth reintroducing the scale for a bit just to ensure you're logging is accurate. Measuring spoons/cups can be filled unevenly, even when people are doing their best to make it accurate.

    As far as protein sources, are you eating beans and seitan? They're two excellent plant-based protein sources.
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    I have no access to a gym because i moved so far I'd need a car which I don't have. I can do cardio like jogging and cycling though. Would this help anything? And I assume jogging would be better?
  • jemhh
    jemhh Posts: 14,273 Member
    If you were already at a healthy weight and your goal was only to "tone up" I would have suggested continuing to eat as is and getting on a progressive resistance routine. That way you could take advantage of your newbie gains while being fully fueled. Too often people jump immediately to dieting and too many women, especially, jump immediately to very low calories when it's not warranted.
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    crevtion wrote: »
    I ate at 1200 when I started. And lost weight. But then I went up to around 1600-1700cal. And now I'm trying to go to 1200-1300 again. I used to use a food scale so it was accurate. I no longer do because I now know how many spoons of this or that weighs because I eat the same things.

    As far as protein sources, are you eating beans and seitan? They're two excellent plant-based protein sources.

    I eat red kidney beans, green peas and chickpeas but I can't have much due to stomach pains :((((
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    jemhh wrote: »
    If you were already at a healthy weight and your goal was only to "tone up" I would have suggested continuing to eat as is and getting on a progressive resistance routine. That way you could take advantage of your newbie gains while being fully fueled. Too often people jump immediately to dieting and too many women, especially, jump immediately to very low calories when it's not warranted.

    So should my main focus be exercise then? I guess if I'm burning hundreds of calories I can't be at 1200 at the same time. I mean i can be very full at that amount from veg but I guess energy wise not enough
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    Cardio for heart and lung health and more to eat.

    Food scale to check calorie creep, we humans are sneaky little blighters in the brain department.

    And you have to train to meet your goals. Throwing around some small weights in an unstructured way is just going to have you spinning your wheels.

    You can do something like You Are Your Own Gym, Convict Conditioning, I believe Strong Curves has bodyweight and dumbbell options? Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

    And personally I use Fitness Blender but don't wing it, I use their programs, they're cheap, there's a lot of options and lots of variety.
  • moonstroller
    moonstroller Posts: 210 Member
    crevtion wrote: »
    I have no access to a gym because i moved so far I'd need a car which I don't have. I can do cardio like jogging and cycling though. Would this help anything? And I assume jogging would be better?

    Jogging and cycling will help burn extra calories, for sure, and that should help use some of that extra fat.
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    I've been doing the Kayla Itsines BBG guide 1 and then some other things on off days. But hers are more squats, burpees, lunges, that kind of thing. Not the typical weighted exercises. Perhaps need a change in that department
  • Theo166
    Theo166 Posts: 2,564 Member
    The basic math says that when you gained weight but thought you were in calorie deficit, you were actually in a surplus. Add some step type activity to increase your daily burn and double down on your tracking skills.
  • b0l3k
    b0l3k Posts: 1 Member
    edited May 2017
    Go back to your maintenance calories and create deficit by training (you may slowly cut calories later - not more then 200-250 every 2-3 weeks). Do some type of FBW (plenty to choose from) max 3 times a week and don't over exercise (cardio on rest days, go easy an walk or cycle - help your central nervous system recover). Don't hate on carbs they regulate your hormones and they're important for your thyroid. If your macros are tracked correctly you will see slight progress. Once things start to move but too slow you may add 4th training day maybe some form of circuit training or introduce HIIT on rest day.
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    b0l3k wrote: »
    Go back to your maintenance calories and create deficit by training (you may slowly cut calories later - not more then 200-250 every 2-3 weeks). Do some type of FBW (plenty to choose from) max 3 times a week and don't over exercise (cardio on rest days, go easy an walk or cycle - help your central nervous system recover). Don't hate on carbs they regulate your hormones and they're important for your thyroid. If your macros are tracked correctly you will see slight progress. Once things start to move but too slow you may add 4th training day maybe some form of circuit training or introduce HIIT on rest day.

    You said about macros but how exactly does that work with weight loss? Is it the ratio of macros that matters or is it merely about sticking to the same split every day? I ask because no one can tell me what a good amount of carbs would be so if I'm comfortable eating 70-80% and stuck to this daily would it have the same effect as me eating 50%? I mean how am I to know how much I need
  • VintageFeline
    VintageFeline Posts: 6,771 Member
    crevtion wrote: »
    b0l3k wrote: »
    Go back to your maintenance calories and create deficit by training (you may slowly cut calories later - not more then 200-250 every 2-3 weeks). Do some type of FBW (plenty to choose from) max 3 times a week and don't over exercise (cardio on rest days, go easy an walk or cycle - help your central nervous system recover). Don't hate on carbs they regulate your hormones and they're important for your thyroid. If your macros are tracked correctly you will see slight progress. Once things start to move but too slow you may add 4th training day maybe some form of circuit training or introduce HIIT on rest day.

    You said about macros but how exactly does that work with weight loss? Is it the ratio of macros that matters or is it merely about sticking to the same split every day? I ask because no one can tell me what a good amount of carbs would be so if I'm comfortable eating 70-80% and stuck to this daily would it have the same effect as me eating 50%? I mean how am I to know how much I need

    Focus on hitting your protein first, the default on MFP is fine, wouldn't hurt to have a bit more. Next fat because it's essential for a bunch of bodily processes. Then carbs. As long as you get enough protein and fat then let the numbers fall where they fall, it's the calories that matter at that point.

    And it's fat that regulates hormones and is essential for nutrient absorption. Carbs are good for building muscle.

    Honestly a lot of the above is overcomplicating it. Get on a structured strength training program. Eat at or a little below maintenance. Be consistent and patient. Take before pictures and measurements and compare maybe 6 months down the line.

    I think you missed it in the flurry of replies but I gave you a couple of strength training options to look into above. They will all tell you what to do and when.
  • crevtion
    crevtion Posts: 72 Member
    crevtion wrote: »
    b0l3k wrote: »
    Go back to your maintenance calories and create deficit by training (you may slowly cut calories later - not more then 200-250 every 2-3 weeks). Do some type of FBW (plenty to choose from) max 3 times a week and don't over exercise (cardio on rest days, go easy an walk or cycle - help your central nervous system recover). Don't hate on carbs they regulate your hormones and they're important for your thyroid. If your macros are tracked correctly you will see slight progress. Once things start to move but too slow you may add 4th training day maybe some form of circuit training or introduce HIIT on rest day.

    You said about macros but how exactly does that work with weight loss? Is it the ratio of macros that matters or is it merely about sticking to the same split every day? I ask because no one can tell me what a good amount of carbs would be so if I'm comfortable eating 70-80% and stuck to this daily would it have the same effect as me eating 50%? I mean how am I to know how much I need


    I think you missed it in the flurry of replies but I gave you a couple of strength training options to look into above. They will all tell you what to do and when.

    Thanks! I'll have a look at those!