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Bone broth reviews?

JennyHsavageJennyHsavage Posts: 123Member Member Posts: 123Member Member
in Recipes
I'm on month 4 of home made bone broth and honestly my skin, hair and nails haven't looked this good in years. I used to suffer with injuries quite frequently from running and my bones have been much stronger.

I make a portion about five times a week as I eat eat a chicken around five nights of the week and I boil up the remains.

I just add a little salt, pepper and Cheyenne pepper while it boils, then I strain it into a container and leave it in the fridge over night and the next day I scrape the fat from the top then reheat and eat.... it's very tasty and soooooo nutritious
edited June 2017
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Replies

  • RenaTXRenaTX Posts: 340Member Member Posts: 340Member Member
    I've been making bone broth / stock for years. The nutrition from "bone broth" is from the connective tissues ( ligaments, cartilage etc ) which is collagen , and amino acids such as hyaluronic acid. Collage and hyaluronic acid is helpful, especially for skin, bones and hair etc. I add egg shells to mine when I make it to increase the hyaluronic acid. There is some calcium and other minerals from the bones but the data I have read shows it's not as high as I often seen claimed.

    Personally I actually enjoy beef tendon which is high in hyaluronic acid and collagen which I know isn't favored in western diets but it's frequently enjoyed in Asian countries. It's given credit for why many Asians look younger than they are.

    I'm half Taiwanese and I believe it LOL. I'm 40 and frequently mistaken for being around 30 , 35 etc. plus. My hair and fingernails grows fast and both are very healthy and strong. I know genetics plays a part in this as well there is something to be said regarding our diets , health and outward appearance.
  • Tried30UserNamesTried30UserNames Posts: 564Member Member Posts: 564Member Member
    I made some bone broth the past couple days. I just put bones, vegetable scraps, a tablespoon or so of ACV and some peppercorns in a crockpot. I cover the whole thing with water and let it cook for 24 hours (sometimes I cook for several days). Sometimes I add chicken feet, backs or necks, but I didn't have any this time.

    Then I strain it, boil to reduce it down to a fairly small amount, stir in some salt and gelatin. When it's gelled, I cut it into cubes (If I had 20 cups of broth before reducing, I cut it into 20 cubes) and keep it in the freezer and in ziploc bags. To use it, I add about a cup of hot water to each cube.
  • JennyHsavageJennyHsavage Posts: 123Member Member Posts: 123Member Member
    RenaTX wrote: »
    I've been making bone broth / stock for years. The nutrition from "bone broth" is from the connective tissues ( ligaments, cartilage etc ) which is collagen , and amino acids such as hyaluronic acid. Collage and hyaluronic acid is helpful, especially for skin, bones and hair etc. I add egg shells to mine when I make it to increase the hyaluronic acid. There is some calcium and other minerals from the bones but the data I have read shows it's not as high as I often seen claimed.

    Personally I actually enjoy beef tendon which is high in hyaluronic acid and collagen which I know isn't favored in western diets but it's frequently enjoyed in Asian countries. It's given credit for why many Asians look younger than they are.

    I'm half Taiwanese and I believe it LOL. I'm 40 and frequently mistaken for being around 30 , 35 etc. plus. My hair and fingernails grows fast and both are very healthy and strong. I know genetics plays a part in this as well there is something to be said regarding our diets , health and outward appearance.

    Yeah iv made some beef/lamb broth too and it's absolutely beautiful.

    Iv been complemented on my skin everywhere I go for the last few months and it's has to be down to the broth.

    I some times put some rice noodles and some crunchy veg when I get bored.

    Thanks for the reply
  • JennyHsavageJennyHsavage Posts: 123Member Member Posts: 123Member Member
    I made some bone broth the past couple days. I just put bones, vegetable scraps, a tablespoon or so of ACV and some peppercorns in a crockpot. I cover the whole thing with water and let it cook for 24 hours (sometimes I cook for several days). Sometimes I add chicken feet, backs or necks, but I didn't have any this time.

    Then I strain it, boil to reduce it down to a fairly small amount, stir in some salt and gelatin. When it's gelled, I cut it into cubes (If I had 20 cups of broth before reducing, I cut it into 20 cubes) and keep it in the freezer and in ziploc bags. To use it, I add about a cup of hot water to each cube.

    That's a fab idea thank you.

    As a chef I always make my own stock for soup and sauces and only discovered the benefits for healing injuries so I kept on making it.

    Thanks for your feedback ;-)
  • JennyHsavageJennyHsavage Posts: 123Member Member Posts: 123Member Member
    crazyravr wrote: »
    You are not making bone broth here. You are making a chicken soup lol :) which is delish on its own.

    Well as a chef I am aware of that thank you, but i do a small chicken every other day to make a good gelatinous broth in a pressure cooker. With the beef bones we usually simmer in the pressure cooker a second time as they have so much more to give!
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,419Member Member Posts: 8,419Member Member
    crazyravr wrote: »
    You are not making bone broth here. You are making a chicken soup lol :) which is delish on its own.

    Well as a chef I am aware of that thank you, but i do a small chicken every other day to make a good gelatinous broth in a pressure cooker. With the beef bones we usually simmer in the pressure cooker a second time as they have so much more to give!

    Well if you are a chef then why are you calling a chicken soup, bone broth lol :)
    I only make my bone broth in the instant pot now. There is no other way.
  • rdevolrdevol Posts: 290Member Member Posts: 290Member Member
    @crazyravr: Care to share your "real" bone broth recipe?
  • RenaTXRenaTX Posts: 340Member Member Posts: 340Member Member
    crazyravr wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    You are not making bone broth here. You are making a chicken soup lol :) which is delish on its own.

    Well as a chef I am aware of that thank you, but i do a small chicken every other day to make a good gelatinous broth in a pressure cooker. With the beef bones we usually simmer in the pressure cooker a second time as they have so much more to give!

    Well if you are a chef then why are you calling a chicken soup, bone broth lol :)
    I only make my bone broth in the instant pot now. There is no other way.

    Your "chicken soup" consists of left over chicken carcass? I wouldn't call that "chicken soup". Chicken soup as I know it is made from whole chicken , not left over carcasses. LOL


  • susanp57susanp57 Posts: 414Member Member Posts: 414Member Member
    I'm a canner. So I make a huge stock pot at a time and can it in pint jars. Need to do some more very soon.

    It's harder these days to get the bits and pieces for beef broth. So many cuts are now sold boneless. I can buy 'soup bones,' and have done so. But I seem to enjoy making stuff, like broth, from bits and pieces that others trash.
  • RenaTXRenaTX Posts: 340Member Member Posts: 340Member Member
    susanp57 wrote: »
    I'm a canner. So I make a huge stock pot at a time and can it in pint jars. Need to do some more very soon.

    It's harder these days to get the bits and pieces for beef broth. So many cuts are now sold boneless. I can buy 'soup bones,' and have done so. But I seem to enjoy making stuff, like broth, from bits and pieces that others trash.

    Many butchers will sell you the bones. It's getting expensive though now that it seems bones are getting more poplar so of course the price has increased. I buy beef bones from my meat market's butcher all the time for my dog, bone broth or marrow .
  • just_Tomekjust_Tomek Posts: 8,419Member Member Posts: 8,419Member Member
    RenaTX wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    You are not making bone broth here. You are making a chicken soup lol :) which is delish on its own.

    Well as a chef I am aware of that thank you, but i do a small chicken every other day to make a good gelatinous broth in a pressure cooker. With the beef bones we usually simmer in the pressure cooker a second time as they have so much more to give!

    Well if you are a chef then why are you calling a chicken soup, bone broth lol :)
    I only make my bone broth in the instant pot now. There is no other way.

    Your "chicken soup" consists of left over chicken carcass? I wouldn't call that "chicken soup". Chicken soup as I know it is made from whole chicken , not left over carcasses. LOL


    Boiling chicken meat is a waste. There is enough fat, collagen and meat left over on the chicken carcass for a soup.
    Either way, nitpicking.
  • RenaTXRenaTX Posts: 340Member Member Posts: 340Member Member
    crazyravr wrote: »
    RenaTX wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    crazyravr wrote: »
    You are not making bone broth here. You are making a chicken soup lol :) which is delish on its own.

    Well as a chef I am aware of that thank you, but i do a small chicken every other day to make a good gelatinous broth in a pressure cooker. With the beef bones we usually simmer in the pressure cooker a second time as they have so much more to give!

    Well if you are a chef then why are you calling a chicken soup, bone broth lol :)
    I only make my bone broth in the instant pot now. There is no other way.

    Your "chicken soup" consists of left over chicken carcass? I wouldn't call that "chicken soup". Chicken soup as I know it is made from whole chicken , not left over carcasses. LOL


    Boiling chicken meat is a waste. There is enough fat, collagen and meat left over on the chicken carcass for a soup.
    Either way, nitpicking.

    LOL Personally I have never seen chicken soup recipes use left overs but to each their own I guess. I would call soup made out of chicken carcass, "stock". That's what I use as the soup base for my chicken soup, but that's not "chicken soup". This "bone broth" idea is just a new term IMO for what my grandmother taught me is "stock" .

    My chicken soup recipe uses fresh chicken and there definitely isn't anything that gets wasted. I prefer big chunks of meat in my soup. We make meals with my chicken soup. If you are leaving big chunks of meat on your carcass to boil down to make "chicken soup" I would call that a waste. I wouldn't be interested in a soup that has little nibbles of meat and left over fat , and collagen. If that's your idea of "chicken soup" maybe that's why you think boiling chicken is a waste. That would just make my husband hangry LOL You definitely sound easy to please if that's what makes you happy.









    edited June 2017
  • Chef_BarbellChef_Barbell Posts: 5,695Member Member Posts: 5,695Member Member
    Lol I have never heard of chicken bones being called chicken soup. And I'm a chef.
  • RaeBeeBabyRaeBeeBaby Posts: 4,350Member Member Posts: 4,350Member Member
    I'm a huge fan of bone broth! I'm lucky to have a whole lot of bones from a grass-fed beef we purchased awhile back. We split the meat 50/50 with my folks, but I asked for most of the bones. The butcher was kind of surprised that I wanted them.

    For the beef broth, I always roast the bones in a slow oven for an hour or two, then put in the crockpot with whatever veggie scraps I have on hand, a little ACV, and leave it to cook on low. I've been known to leave it going for 3 days. Not sure if that's OK?? But I've never had any ill effects from it. I figure the longer might be better for getting all the nutrients from the bones. (Experts, please correct me if that's wrong for whatever reason.)

    For chicken and other pre-cooked animal bones, I basically do the same without the roasting step. The bones are usually so soft at the end that they just fall apart. After I strain out the broth I take the bones and whatever veggie/meat/mush is left and put it through the blender to make a slurry. I freeze that stuff in muffin cups and add one of them (thawed) a day to my dog's kibble. (There's absolutely no sharp bone shards left.) My furbabes love it and have beautiful shiny coats! The only drawback is that I have to have their nails trimmed more frequently, so that works for both humans and canines.

    I put the finished broth in mason jars and freeze. I often use it just like regular stock to make rice or quinoa, or as the base for soup. Just delicious nutritiousness!
  • RaeBeeBabyRaeBeeBaby Posts: 4,350Member Member Posts: 4,350Member Member
    RenaTX wrote: »

    Personally I actually enjoy beef tendon which is high in hyaluronic acid and collagen which I know isn't favored in western diets but it's frequently enjoyed in Asian countries. It's given credit for why many Asians look younger than they are.

    My favorite Vietnamese restaurant makes a Pho that has beef tendon, along with other rare cuts of beef. I accidentally ordered it one time and wondered, at first, what I was eating. It was quite wonderful! If that's the secret behind why Asians look younger, I'm ordering that tasty bowl every time I go there! :D
  • RenfieldXRenfieldX Posts: 88Member Member Posts: 88Member Member
    Is bone broth just an alternate name for boiling the bones to make stock, or is there a distinction that I'm missing?
  • CTcutieCTcutie Posts: 645Member Member Posts: 645Member Member
    I haven't had real stock since my mom used to make it many years ago and had to know the difference between "broth", "stock", and now,apparently, "soup"... not a chef; I'm a scientist who likes to cook sometimes, lol :smiley:

    Stock = "bone broth": viscous; cooks for 16-18 hours (beef, lamb) or 6-8 hours for chicken & uses BONES -> COLLAGEN -> paleo

    Broth = old school broth = "soup": thinner; cooks for 2-4 hours

    Tips:
      do NOT use marrow bones (no meat, marrow is fatty & will get stinky?)- use soup bones, says the article
      • Add alt at the end
      • Roast the bones BEFORE boiling/instantpot
      • Use lots of veggies to enhance the flavor (pics on the site are nice)

      http://www.bonappetit.com/story/difference-between-bone-broth-and-stock
    • eyer0lleyer0ll Posts: 313Member Member Posts: 313Member Member
      RenfieldX wrote: »
      Is bone broth just an alternate name for boiling the bones to make stock, or is there a distinction that I'm missing?

      1. Yes
      2. No
    • JennyHsavageJennyHsavage Posts: 123Member Member Posts: 123Member Member
      susanp57 wrote: »
      I'm a canner. So I make a huge stock pot at a time and can it in pint jars. Need to do some more very soon.

      It's harder these days to get the bits and pieces for beef broth. So many cuts are now sold boneless. I can buy 'soup bones,' and have done so. But I seem to enjoy making stuff, like broth, from bits and pieces that others trash.

      Waste not want not :-) broth/stock as we call it in lovely old Ireland... it's beautiful and thanks for the jars idea ;-)
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