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Satiety Index and Fullness Factor

jessiferrrbjessiferrrb Member Posts: 1,758 Member Member Posts: 1,758 Member
I was trying to figure out whether satiety is something that is really individual or if there are some underlying general truths and i came across the satiety index and fullness factor. i really wanted to see if one macro was superior for fullness per calorie (spoiler alert - maybe not?) and went down the rabbit hole a little bit here.

anyway, here are the basics:

http://www.mendosa.com/satiety.htm
http://nutritiondata.self.com/topics/fullness-factor


does anyone have any knowledge or experience regarding this? the second website has a recipe tool for analyzing the fullness factor of meals and i'm curious to play around with it and see if it corresponds to my actual satiety, but they want me to register and i hate signing up for things that turn out to be *kitten*.

Replies

  • eburns55555eburns55555 Member Posts: 26 Member Member Posts: 26 Member
    I know for myself, the more protein and whole grain I eat, the fuller I usually am, as a rule, so the information about the satiety index is consistent with that, but I know a lot of my experiences with satiety and hunger dealt also with getting proper sleep. I found that when I was not not sleeping as much, a hormone called leptin was not getting created in the amounts that it should have to satiate me, making me susceptible to late night eating, and also created more ghrelin, which is a hormone that increases hunger, so the lack of sleep was kind of a double whammy for me.
  • jessiferrrbjessiferrrb Member Posts: 1,758 Member Member Posts: 1,758 Member
    Interesting, that is way above my level of knowledge but a good place to start looking at things more in depth.
    Thanks
  • dlkfoxdlkfox Member Posts: 463 Member Member Posts: 463 Member
    Look into the Glycemic Index (GI) foods. It might be relevant to your research.
  • Gallowmere1984Gallowmere1984 Member Posts: 6,626 Member Member Posts: 6,626 Member
    No single macro is sufficient, unfortunately. Protein heavy seems to help people here, who are likely coming from a carb heavy SAD. However, protein alone doesn't work. Legitimate rabbit starvation (where people eat literally nothing but extremely lean meat) shows this. Eating to the point where one's stomach is physically distended, but still being hungry, generally indicates a problem.
  • scottburger104scottburger104 Member Posts: 90 Member Member Posts: 90 Member
    I find personally that protein/fat/fiber are helpful along with only eating within an 8 hour window. I get along pretty well on reduced calories.
  • eric2lighteric2light Member Posts: 110 Member Member Posts: 110 Member
    No single macro is sufficient, unfortunately. Protein heavy seems to help people here, who are likely coming from a carb heavy SAD. However, protein alone doesn't work. Legitimate rabbit starvation (where people eat literally nothing but extremely lean meat) shows this. Eating to the point where one's stomach is physically distended, but still being hungry, generally indicates a problem.

    What does "SAD" mean in this context?
  • kimny72kimny72 Member Posts: 15,950 Member Member Posts: 15,950 Member
    eric2light wrote: »
    No single macro is sufficient, unfortunately. Protein heavy seems to help people here, who are likely coming from a carb heavy SAD. However, protein alone doesn't work. Legitimate rabbit starvation (where people eat literally nothing but extremely lean meat) shows this. Eating to the point where one's stomach is physically distended, but still being hungry, generally indicates a problem.

    What does "SAD" mean in this context?

    Standard American Diet
  • Keto_VampireKeto_Vampire Member Posts: 1,679 Member Member Posts: 1,679 Member
    Fat in itself is not very satiating as stated on that website; however, fat often makes these mono-food ratings (satiety index and glycemic index) irrelevant when combined due to the strong influence of slowing gastric emptying rate. Scales seem more relevant for snacking, not necessarily eating a whole/balanced meal of food combos
  • AnnPT77AnnPT77 Member, Premium Posts: 21,854 Member Member, Premium Posts: 21,854 Member
    All I know is that when there's a thread here where lots of people discuss their personal satiety factors in detail, self-reports vary all over the map.
  • robertw486robertw486 Member, Greeter, Premium Posts: 2,279 Member Member, Greeter, Premium Posts: 2,279 Member
    IFZTRR
    (In For Zombie Thread Revival Responses!)

    AnnPT77 wrote: »
    All I know is that when there's a thread here where lots of people discuss their personal satiety factors in detail, self-reports vary all over the map.

    I'd agree. I've seen some of those indexes, and though several foods are indexed in a fashion I can agree with, other foods are way off. To some extent I think this is due to personal like or dislike of the food. Like many people, I can easily overeat something I enjoy more, and the entire satiety thing is sort of out the window until after the fact.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    dlkfox wrote: »
    Look into the Glycemic Index (GI) foods. It might be relevant to your research.

    I think the satiety studies actually contradicted the idea that GI was the key. For example, plain potatoes have a high GI (compared to many other foods) and yet score very high on the satiety index.

    I think it's individual but there are probably things that work for more people than others, like protein, fiber. Other foods are probably more often than not NOT sating (sugar, liquids, sugar + fat, other refined carbs + fat), but again there will be individual variations.

    My suspicion is that individual foods matter less than overall diet, and there are ideas like that we tend to be sated faster when we eat less variable foods. For example, one can only eat so much of a particular thing, even if you enjoy it, but if offered a second thing (like dessert) all of a sudden a desire to eat returns.
  • lemurcat12lemurcat12 Member Posts: 30,886 Member Member Posts: 30,886 Member
    Oh, heh, totally missed that it was a zombie thread!
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