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Honest opinions on weight loss surgery

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  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,373 Member Member Posts: 24,373 Member
    urloved33 wrote: »
    urloved33 wrote: »
    I'm not opposed to the concept, and I know surgery candidates often have to demonstrate some level of non-surgical weight loss as part of the program.

    That said, I only know two people that have had WLS and both of them re-gained the weight - so, it's not a miracle cure and there still needs to be the same level of discipline to maintain results as those that lose weight without surgery.

    I thought I read that less than 5% keep the weight off...seems like a failing procedure to me.

    Statistics are terrible for sustaining any weight loss long term, including that accomplished without WLS.

    while that may be true...when you are going under the knife at phenomenal expense and becoming a high pay out for the insurance company ...you would want the COSTLY PROCEDURE to be viable and it does not sound like it actually is.

    What is the source of that 5% figure? The statistics I'm seeing online seem to indicate that it is more successful than that.
  • urloved33urloved33 Member Posts: 3,361 Member Member Posts: 3,361 Member
    urloved33 wrote: »
    urloved33 wrote: »
    I'm not opposed to the concept, and I know surgery candidates often have to demonstrate some level of non-surgical weight loss as part of the program.

    That said, I only know two people that have had WLS and both of them re-gained the weight - so, it's not a miracle cure and there still needs to be the same level of discipline to maintain results as those that lose weight without surgery.

    I thought I read that less than 5% keep the weight off...seems like a failing procedure to me.

    Statistics are terrible for sustaining any weight loss long term, including that accomplished without WLS.

    while that may be true...when you are going under the knife at phenomenal expense and becoming a high pay out for the insurance company ...you would want the COSTLY PROCEDURE to be viable and it does not sound like it actually is.

    What is the source of that 5% figure? The statistics I'm seeing online seem to indicate that it is more successful than that.

    My 600lb life website. Dr Now.

  • janejellyrolljanejellyroll Member Posts: 24,373 Member Member Posts: 24,373 Member
    urloved33 wrote: »
    urloved33 wrote: »
    urloved33 wrote: »
    I'm not opposed to the concept, and I know surgery candidates often have to demonstrate some level of non-surgical weight loss as part of the program.

    That said, I only know two people that have had WLS and both of them re-gained the weight - so, it's not a miracle cure and there still needs to be the same level of discipline to maintain results as those that lose weight without surgery.

    I thought I read that less than 5% keep the weight off...seems like a failing procedure to me.

    Statistics are terrible for sustaining any weight loss long term, including that accomplished without WLS.

    while that may be true...when you are going under the knife at phenomenal expense and becoming a high pay out for the insurance company ...you would want the COSTLY PROCEDURE to be viable and it does not sound like it actually is.

    What is the source of that 5% figure? The statistics I'm seeing online seem to indicate that it is more successful than that.

    My 600lb life website. Dr Now.

    The TLC website? I just checked it out and I don't see any statistics about weight loss surgery there.
  • CharlieBeansmomTraceyCharlieBeansmomTracey Member Posts: 7,702 Member Member Posts: 7,702 Member
    anyone that I know that has had any type of weight loss surgery has went through hell one way or another. one thing was the very low calorie diets you have to do for several months after the surgery because your stomach cant handle big amounts of food, some have issues with being able to absord certain vitamins,some have issues with not being able to digest certain food,

    one kept having complications from the surgery and died,she was in and out of the hospital over the course of a year the first 3 months she had an issue where a hole opened up in her stomach and she went into sepsis,she was in a medically induced coma for 3 months because she was so bad off they didnt think she would make it. she tried losing on her own and for some reason just couldnt do it.,my hubbys friends has lost a lot of weight but hes not having an easy time.

    he isnt losing weight again and hes trying to be more active,but its still not easy he was over 500lbs.(closer to 300 now). in my opinion its harder having the surgery because you are more liable to have issues with things and your health. losing weight withou surgery can have a big impact on health but I think,its more positive impacts and less complications can arise. not saying its the case.most of us work hard to lose weight,but I think those who dont have the surgery dont have to face all the issues those with the surgery do.

    only one of them has gained it most of it back and stopped losing only because she thought it would be a quick fix.she obviously didnt listen when they told her she would have to still watch what she ate. most doctors will still make you lose so much weight on your own before you have the surgery especially if you are severely obese,because of safety issues due to the anesthesia.
  • Sunshine_And_SandSunshine_And_Sand Member Posts: 1,320 Member Member Posts: 1,320 Member
    IMO, WLS isn't for me. I've never been more than slightly overweight though, so I can't say if I'd still feel that way if I was at the point of qualifying for WLS, since I've never actually been there...
    Anyway, for those at that point, either way they choose, they are making that decision to improve their health and having to commit to that decision to get the results.
    Also, I wouldn't exactly say WLS is an easy way out. Everyone I know who had it still worked very hard after their surgery to continue and maintain the weight loss, including becoming and staying more active as well as following MD advice for nutrition.
  • estherdragonbatestherdragonbat Member Posts: 5,285 Member Member Posts: 5,285 Member
    My father and sister have both had it. My sister had hers some years back and has had some ill effects due to the surgery not having been perfected to the degree it later was. My father has had much fewer side effects. He was after me to get it done.

    What made me balk was looking at the pre- and post-surgery diet. I see that my father can't eat fresh bread anymore; it needs to be toasted. Whole grains and legumes need to be avoided, at least in the short-term, possibly longer.

    I'm a vegetarian. Having the surgery would eliminate too many of my dietary staples for too long. It just wasn't something I was prepared to accept. But I certainly don't look down on people who did find WLS to be the right choice. It simply wasn't mine.
  • tiptoethruthetulipstiptoethruthetulips Member, Greeter Posts: 3,128 Member Member, Greeter Posts: 3,128 Member
    If it were the easy way out it wouldn't the tool of last resort for the majority.
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