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Magnesium keeping me awake!

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  • Gisel2015Gisel2015 Posts: 2,625Member Member Posts: 2,625Member Member
    I was prescribed magnesium by my neurologist to help with the migraines HA. The best one is chelated magnesium according to the doctor, due to the high absorbance and the bio-availability; I got the morningpep brand. I take 200mg at night and I also take calcium at night. I also have PVCs and the magnesium helps to relax the heart muscle and helps with leg cramps post DVT.

    I did notice that if I take 400mg, specially on the weekends (Nature Made brand), I don't sleep that soundly as when I take the 200mg. I don't know if it is because the lower dose is more efficient or if one brand is better than the other.

    I agree with the comment posted by @lorrbp with respect to paradoxical reactions to medication or supplements. I can’t take more than 500mg of acetaminophen (Tylenol) during the day because it puts me to sleep. Go figure!

    @Euroboss: magnesium was prescribed by my neurologist; she is an MD, not a quack or a naturopath doctor. Mg has also been recommended by my primary doctor to help control BP and the night cramps in my leg, and by the cardiologist for the PVCs. So, you are totally out of base with your comment.
  • EurobossEuroboss Posts: 56Member, Premium Member Posts: 56Member, Premium Member
    ok, good answer. I believe you and that's good to learn. I didn't know that actual doctors prescribed it for migraines. Good to hear your advice is coming from a real doctor.
  • GottaBurnEmAllGottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722Member Member Posts: 7,722Member Member
    Euroboss wrote: »
    The only people I've ever heard prescribe magnesium are people that can't actually prescribe anything, i.e. not doctors. Naturopaths and other quacks do the magnesium. Show me evidence to the contrary. If anyone I saw talked about magnesium I would stop seeing that person.

    My neurologist is a specialist in his field and is on a team at a research clinic for headaches. It's quite common to prescribe magnesium to migraine patients.
  • EurobossEuroboss Posts: 56Member, Premium Member Posts: 56Member, Premium Member
    Well, by definition all neurologists are specialists.
  • YvetteK2015YvetteK2015 Posts: 648Member Member Posts: 648Member Member
    I'm on a fairly high dose of magnesium as part of my migraine management protocol.

    I sleep like a baby.
    I'm on a fairly high dose of magnesium as part of my migraine management protocol.

    I sleep like a baby.

    What form of magnesium do you take and what dose for your migraines, if you don't mind me asking?
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Posts: 9,470Member Member Posts: 9,470Member Member
    Euroboss wrote: »
    Well, by definition all neurologists are specialists.

    neurologists are real doctors.
  • GottaBurnEmAllGottaBurnEmAll Posts: 7,722Member Member Posts: 7,722Member Member
    The point missed was that my neuro is a headache specialist. I thought that was pretty obvious, but that other poster is gone now.

    Anyway, I'm taking 800 mg of oxide daily.
  • YvetteK2015YvetteK2015 Posts: 648Member Member Posts: 648Member Member
    The point missed was that my neuro is a headache specialist. I thought that was pretty obvious, but that other poster is gone now.

    Anyway, I'm taking 800 mg of oxide daily.

    Thanx
  • 338378mag338378mag Posts: 1Member Member Posts: 1Member Member
    my understanding is that if you take magnesium and you are severely deficient, you will feel a big energy boost and metobolic increase, insomnia, sweating, etc. I have experienced this first hand. 80% of people are Mg deficient. Your body is starved for this "miracle mineral" and that is the reaction. Once you get your level straight, which could easily take a month or more of lots of Mg (more than you can take orally), then Mg will work properly for you. btw Mg deficiency is really bad, you can't detox among other things.
  • neugebauer52neugebauer52 Posts: 792Member Member Posts: 792Member Member
    Since starting simple exercises - mainly walking and some pool aerobics - I have a lot of thigh muscular pain. I am not a great friend of pharmaceutics and do not want to pop a pill just because of some niggling pain. Some 2 weeks ago I heard about Magnesium - mineral salts which relax muscles and muscle cramps. So I bought some, took one a day and after a week the pain / spasm / cramps were gone. Great feeling after battling for 300 days. Just to double check: I stopped taking them and within 3 days it was back to the pain. Started them again last week and by now the pain is gone. What does it do? How does it work? No idea. My body might need some mineral salts - who knows?
  • Goober1142Goober1142 Posts: 195Member Member Posts: 195Member Member
    Yes, me too. Seems to keep me awake if I take it at night
  • Gisel2015Gisel2015 Posts: 2,625Member Member Posts: 2,625Member Member
    I hope that this information is helpful. Magnesium Glycinate works better for me at 200mg, while the 400mg version of magnesium oxide and citrate doesn't.

    When it comes to helping you get a good night’s sleep, the best forms of magnesium include:

    Magnesium Glycinate. One of the most absorbable forms of magnesium, it’s bonded to glycine, which also helps the body relax. Magnesium glycinate is a form that is least likely to cause digestive distress or diarrhea.

    Magnesium Chelate.
    In magnesium chelate, the mineral is bound to one or more amino acids. Like magnesium glycinate, it’s easily absorbed by the body.

    Magnesium Threonate. Magnesium bonded to Threonate is very easily absorbed by the body. It’s also the only form that can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it one of the best forms of magnesium for improving not only sleep but also brain function.

    Magnesium Chloride. A study published in Magnesium Research found that magnesium chloride was the form that had the highest absorbability and availability. An additional study involving 200 patients revealed that magnesium chloride helped improve sleep in 99% of patients.

    Combining forms of magnesium can often provide the best night’s sleep. For example, MagTech Magnesium Complex includes three of the best forms available – Threonate, glycinate, and taurate.

    Worst Forms of Magnesium for Sleep

    You’re better off leaving some types of magnesium on the shelf. While these forms might have their benefits, they are not absorbed well and can cause unpleasant side effects.

    Magnesium oxide. Magnesium oxide is a great form to take if you need the laxative effects of magnesium. But it’s not so great for sleep since the body doesn’t absorb it very well.

    Magnesium citrate. Magnesium citrate is another form of magnesium that’s great for use as a laxative (used to treat and prevent constipation). But you’ll get much better results from other forms if your goal is to improve your sleep.


    https://corpina.com/best-form-magnesium-sleep/
  • Keto_VampireKeto_Vampire Posts: 1,692Member Member Posts: 1,692Member Member
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    I hope that this information is helpful. Magnesium Glycinate works better for me at 200mg, while the 400mg version of magnesium oxide and citrate doesn't.

    When it comes to helping you get a good night’s sleep, the best forms of magnesium include:

    Magnesium Glycinate. One of the most absorbable forms of magnesium, it’s bonded to glycine, which also helps the body relax. Magnesium glycinate is a form that is least likely to cause digestive distress or diarrhea.

    Magnesium Chelate.
    In magnesium chelate, the mineral is bound to one or more amino acids. Like magnesium glycinate, it’s easily absorbed by the body.

    Magnesium Threonate. Magnesium bonded to Threonate is very easily absorbed by the body. It’s also the only form that can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it one of the best forms of magnesium for improving not only sleep but also brain function.

    Magnesium Chloride. A study published in Magnesium Research found that magnesium chloride was the form that had the highest absorbability and availability. An additional study involving 200 patients revealed that magnesium chloride helped improve sleep in 99% of patients.

    Combining forms of magnesium can often provide the best night’s sleep. For example, MagTech Magnesium Complex includes three of the best forms available – Threonate, glycinate, and taurate.

    Worst Forms of Magnesium for Sleep

    You’re better off leaving some types of magnesium on the shelf. While these forms might have their benefits, they are not absorbed well and can cause unpleasant side effects.

    Magnesium oxide. Magnesium oxide is a great form to take if you need the laxative effects of magnesium. But it’s not so great for sleep since the body doesn’t absorb it very well.

    Magnesium citrate. Magnesium citrate is another form of magnesium that’s great for use as a laxative (used to treat and prevent constipation). But you’ll get much better results from other forms if your goal is to improve your sleep.


    https://corpina.com/best-form-magnesium-sleep/

    Magnesium oxide definitely sucks in terms of bioavailability/absorption. Other forms (glycinate, chelate, threonate, chloride) do have better absoprtion; standout being threonate having notorious blood brain barrier penetration/CNS effect but is very pricey.

    Wouldn't say magnesium citrate is bad by any means; it's often just dosed too high initially (laxative effect). Can be utilized well in low doses titrated up very slowly (does have good absorption). Other issue is the dose form at times (commonly comes in capsules/can't divide accurately or used as the oral solution - have to use VERY modest amounts - labeled for laxative use to use 1/2 to entire bottle)
  • Gisel2015Gisel2015 Posts: 2,625Member Member Posts: 2,625Member Member
    @Keto_Vampire
    I think that I will try the MagTech Magnesium Complex. When I sleep better my HAs, are very mild, if I do get any, and the same with the migraines. I know that it is not cheap, but my health is worthy.
  • CahgetsfitCahgetsfit Posts: 1,737Member Member Posts: 1,737Member Member
    interesting. I used to take ZMA and at first I slept like a log, then I started to have disrupted sleep. After some time taking it though. I stopped and sleep well again.

    I bought just plain magnesium and take that nightly and not a problem anymore. Not sure which type - I just picked one up off the shelf in the chemist... I keep meaning to look into getting the 'right' type when this bottle runs out.

    I tend to cramp a bit if I don't take it.
  • Keto_VampireKeto_Vampire Posts: 1,692Member Member Posts: 1,692Member Member
    Gisel2015 wrote: »
    @Keto_Vampire
    I think that I will try the MagTech Magnesium Complex. When I sleep better my HAs, are very mild, if I do get any, and the same with the migraines. I know that it is not cheap, but my health is worthy.

    Threonate was good for sleep, lowered BP slightly, very calming; just stopped because the price was a bit off putting. Was thinking about actually re-trying just being conservative
  • MeganReid1991MeganReid1991 Posts: 170Member Member Posts: 170Member Member
    Omg this is so weird I recently just started taking magnesium and I literally can’t sleep at all. I thought it was stress but maybe I’ll stop taking it for awhile and see if it helps.
  • Gisel2015Gisel2015 Posts: 2,625Member Member Posts: 2,625Member Member
    Omg this is so weird I recently just started taking magnesium and I literally can’t sleep at all. I thought it was stress but maybe I’ll stop taking it for awhile and see if it helps.

    Or check the kind of magnesium that you are taking. Check what I posted 2/11.
  • bvgyzsw6fgbvgyzsw6fg Posts: 3Member Member Posts: 3Member Member
    I don't take magnesium to sleep better or anything related to that but here's my story. First of all without taking magnesium I have no problem sleeping even though I don't sleep when i should/enough and wake up feeling tired (whether this really is cause of lack of sleep I'm not sure but definitely plays a role too).

    Now about taking magnesium. Let me first make clear that it doesn't matter what kind of magnesium I take (I also doubt it has to do with the different kind of magnesium's, at worst it would probably just not aid in sleeping better but not make it worse either)

    When I take magnesium in the evening (some time before going to bed) it gets hard to fall asleep and I only sleep 1-2 hours at a time before waking up. It also affects dreams/nightmares and makes it way more active. Despite this I don't wake up tired instead it actually feels like I'm all awake and ready even though I don't exactly feel rested out at the same time.

    When I take magnesium in the morning (with breakfast) it actually has the complete opposite effect. I feel sleepy and driving a car can get dangerous.

    Maybe I should take it somewhere in the afternoon (if it doesn't make me sleepy on the way back that is)

    Other things to mentioned that could be related is your vitamin D level. As Magnesium and vitamin D work together. Without enough magnesium, vitamin D does not get absorbed well no matter how much vitamin D you take. Maybe more vitamin D also depletes magnesium faster or its the other way around and related to vitamin D after al instead of magnesium. Just like how a vitamin D deficiency could be caused by a magnesium deficiency.

    Even though not generally known I know there are more people who experience these "magnesium keeping me awake" effects. Did anyone experience sleep paralysis with taking magnesium?
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