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Running the day after a long run???

RunnerGirl238RunnerGirl238 Posts: 357Member Member Posts: 357Member Member
I did 10 miles today, a lovely, runner's high-inducing 10. I felt like I could have gone more. I'm not sore at all.

I want to do a shake out run tomorrow to see what it is like to run on tired legs. I've been googling to see what the pros say, but can't find concise answers suggestions.

I've been running for years, but have never run the day after a long run. What do you all do?
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Replies

  • RunsWithBeesRunsWithBees Posts: 1,108Member Member Posts: 1,108Member Member
    After a run like that if I run the next day I do a shorter run, a 5K at an easy pace or go for a nice walk :)
  • AlphaHowlsAlphaHowls Posts: 1,245Member Member Posts: 1,245Member Member
    Personally, I run long distance, every day. I would not advise anyone to do so, unless that is what they are training for/building up to.
  • funjen1972funjen1972 Posts: 949Member Member Posts: 949Member Member
    When the weather is warmer I run almost everyday. Long runs are 9-11 miles, shortest is about 5 miles.
  • spiriteagle99spiriteagle99 Posts: 2,361Member Member Posts: 2,361Member Member
    Some training plans have a short recovery run the day after the long run. It can help with recovery, as long as you keep it easy. I often rearrange my running schedule to take advantage of good weather or to avoid bad. I've done many runs the day after a long run. If my plan says Saturday is 7 miles and Sunday 16, but Sunday is going to be snowing, but Saturday fair, I'll do my long run outdoors on Saturday and my 7 on the TM on Sunday. It works. Just try to keep to the hard - easy - hard - easy concept where you don't do two hard workouts in a row.
  • apullumapullum Posts: 4,248Member Member Posts: 4,248Member Member
    Since you're not a newbie, I would say try it. After all, if you have any plans for a running schedule that's more than 3x/week, you'll have to find ways to fit in back-to-back runs. I do a short run (5 miles) every M/W/F, 5k walks on T/Th, and then if I'm training for something I do a weekend long run on whichever day is most convenient, so there's always going to be a long run followed by a short run or vice versa.

    For me there's a tradeoff in performance. If I run hard one day, I may still be tired the next and my run might be tough. If I run at a comfortable pace both days, it's manageable, though the second day is tougher. I wouldn't do consecutive days if one of them is speedwork, for that reason. I inadvertently did this today: yesterday mid-morning I got caught in an unexpected cold rainstorm that I was not dressed for, and I wound up freezing my butt off while doing the last two miles at race pace just trying to get home. Today I ran 7 miles at sunrise, dressed for rain that never happened, and it was a slog the whole way.
  • mengqiz86mengqiz86 Posts: 174Member Member Posts: 174Member Member
    I do a 5 mile easy after my 10-12mi long runs. I run them at about the same pace/~10 seconds slower pace as my long run. The next!!
  • FL_HikerFL_Hiker Posts: 919Member Member Posts: 919Member Member
    I’ve heard ultra people usually do back to back long runs. Depending on your level 10 miles doesn’t sound excessive.
  • sarabushbysarabushby Posts: 553Member Member Posts: 553Member Member
    I don’t think it’s a problem at all and a recovery run may help if anything, just keep the pace down and don’t be shooting for any PBs.
    Of course, doing a swim or bike or other cross training could be beneficial too.
  • dewd2dewd2 Posts: 2,163Member Member Posts: 2,163Member Member
    EASY runs the day after are not a problem (and can be helpful). Just make sure to keep it relaxed.
  • CateyjCateyj Posts: 14Member Member Posts: 14Member Member
    I have only been running for about 2 years but was advised to do a gentle recovery run after a long run. I did a half marathon today, so planning on a gentle 4 -5 miles tomorrow x
  • DX2JX2DX2JX2 Posts: 1,921Member Member Posts: 1,921Member Member
    Run a super easy 5K. This is a fairly standard recovery practice. It's very low risk if you're not in any kind of abnormal pain (not including normal muscle soreness).

    You can even go longer if you feel good and want to keep going. Just make sure to keep the pace really easy.
  • mbaker566mbaker566 Posts: 9,919Member Member Posts: 9,919Member Member
    a nice shakeout can be helpful with recovery. something between 2-5 miles depending on your fitness level and terrain
  • cyndit1cyndit1 Posts: 139Member Member Posts: 139Member Member
    Generally after my long run, the next day I take a spin class for an hour and lift. I save my recovery run for Monday. Its worked for me.
  • firef1y72firef1y72 Posts: 1,455Member Member Posts: 1,455Member Member
    I did 10 miles today, a lovely, runner's high-inducing 10. I felt like I could have gone more. I'm not sore at all.

    I want to do a shake out run tomorrow to see what it is like to run on tired legs. I've been googling to see what the pros say, but can't find concise answers suggestions.

    I've been running for years, but have never run the day after a long run. What do you all do?

    I near enough always do a 3.1 recovery run the day after a long run. I find it helps flush the lactic acid out of the legs, and eases a lot of the aches and pains that I get after really long runs. I normally have a deep stretch session with my PT first though.
  • RunnerGrl1982RunnerGrl1982 Posts: 412Member Member Posts: 412Member Member
    I feel a bit like the odd one out after reading the responses. My two cents on this is in the range of personal preference, because only you know what your body can and cannot handle, how well you recover, etc...

    I typically always follow my long runs with a full rest day. Only after 48 hours will I go out for an easy run following a long run. Though, I also will also caveat for me, personally, that a long run consists of lengths greater than 13 miles. There have been mid-distance runs, where I've ran up to roughly 9 miles and followed another the consecutively at 5-6 miles the next day. That run is always run at easy pace - as most have mentioned above already.
  • MPDeanMPDean Posts: 73Member Member Posts: 73Member Member
    Don't worry about lactic acid, as soon as you are back in aerobic conditions it is converted back to glucose. Distance running is by necessity an aerobic activity, anaerobic respiration is only sustainable for relatively short periods.
  • ChieflrgChieflrg Posts: 7,941Member Member Posts: 7,941Member Member
    Managing the external and internal work loads and fatigue is key to any training.

    There is absolute one way to train. Life stress as well as training stress is different for everyone.

    It's about what you are capable of from the adaptation and recovery of training and being reasonable within your program.
  • runnermom419runnermom419 Posts: 335Member Member Posts: 335Member Member
    I did 10 miles today, a lovely, runner's high-inducing 10. I felt like I could have gone more. I'm not sore at all.

    I want to do a shake out run tomorrow to see what it is like to run on tired legs. I've been googling to see what the pros say, but can't find concise answers suggestions.

    I've been running for years, but have never run the day after a long run. What do you all do?

    I ran 5 Saturday, 8 yesterday, and am considering an easy 5K tonight before Tabata class. But, I am training for several challenges. One of which is running a 10K at 8 PM Saturday night, and then getting up the next morning and running a half marathon at 7 AM. Training on tired legs is important for me.
  • TavistockToadTavistockToad Posts: 35,819Member Member Posts: 35,819Member Member
    I feel a bit like the odd one out after reading the responses. My two cents on this is in the range of personal preference, because only you know what your body can and cannot handle, how well you recover, etc...

    I typically always follow my long runs with a full rest day. Only after 48 hours will I go out for an easy run following a long run. Though, I also will also caveat for me, personally, that a long run consists of lengths greater than 13 miles. There have been mid-distance runs, where I've ran up to roughly 9 miles and followed another the consecutively at 5-6 miles the next day. That run is always run at easy pace - as most have mentioned above already.

    My current plan has 60 minutes cross training the day after my long run day - I'm starting with 30 minutes as historically I have also gone rest day too.

    Legs felt ok on the bike yesterday, but now I have run again today they feel a little tired...
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